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Author Topic: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop  (Read 1536 times)

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Offline Jim_Rogers

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Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« on: June 08, 2013, 05:27:42 pm »
I'll be teaching a weekend workshop this coming weekend June 14th, 15th and 16th in Carlisle, MA 01741.
If you are interested in coming for one, two or all three days, send me an email to jrsawmill (at) verizon (dot) net.
Cost is $100 per day per person.

We will be covering the standard, basic layout of mortise, tenon, and brace.

Jim Rogers

PS. The FF will receive 5% of any fees collected from seeing this notice.
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Piston

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2013, 04:50:13 am »
What's the project going to be Jim? 


-Matt
“What the Lion is to the Cat the Mastiff is to the Dog, the noblest of the family; he stands alone, and all others sink before him. His courage does not exceed his temper and generosity, and in attachment he equals the kindest of his race.”

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 08:03:10 am »
12 x 16' cabin to be erected in Maine. It has a porch on one side, a loft for sleeping and an overhanging set of roof rafters for firewood cover on one eave wall.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2013, 03:41:04 pm »
Weekend workshop story.

This past weekend, June 14, 15, and 16th, I was teaching a family group of beginner timber framers.

They want to cut a 12x16’ cabin for their property in the Maine woods. We began the workshop with unloading the timbers from the U-haul trailer on Friday morning. These timbers were very wet as it had rained all night and most of the morning while they were being driven over to the barn where the workshop was going to be held.

To dry them we set up two fans, one box fan on the floor blowing on the timbers for Saturday, and one stand fan that was blowing on the timber that I was going to use as the demo post for the mortise cutting demo. This really helped a lot.

Here is a picture of me with one of the students.

 

 

Above you’ll see his is about to start knifing his housing with the Big Al referencing off the wrong face of the timber.
He is a math teacher and it was great having him there for answering some math questions.

Here is his brother, who is also a teacher, but he teaches “shop” and is a very experienced wood worker:

 

 

Above he is marking the reference edge and the adjacent face with the red lumber crayon.

Friday, I had four students and one had to leave early. But we all got a lot done. The three students there got their own mortise and housing cut by the end of the day.

Here is a shot of the work area we had available in this 40’ x 60’ canted queens post barn.

 

 

Saturday morning we started at 7:30 am and the barn owner, our host was there as well.

We began with a tenon cutting demo.

Here is a picture of me cutting the tenon with a skill saw:

 

 

And finishing the cut with a hand saw:

 

 

In this picture the shop teacher’s son is working on a timber.

 

 

And here is another shot of him working on his tenon:

 

 

The host is a very experienced worker as well. Here is a shot of him working on his tenon:

 

 

This picture is of a through mortise and housing on post 1B, and the tenon on this post was just finished.

 

 

Here the host is checking the thickness of his tenon with a caliper:

 

 

Making sure your plate and blade are truly at 90° is very important:

 

 

When your tools are sharp you can make a good mortise:

 

 

Sunday morning we again began at 7:30 am and it was time to learn how to layout and cut braces.

Here is a shot of the students all working on their brace tenons:

 

 

 

 

While we were all working on braces the workshop space was affectionately known as “Brace-land”.

We all did a brace:
 
 

 

After they finished the braces we then moved on to layout and cutting of the brace pocket.

Here two students are discussing the exact layout area:

 

 

It was late in the day on Sunday and it was a cloudy day so we had to break out some light to be able to see better:

 

 

The shop teacher brought his shaving horse so they could make their own pegs. Here he is demonstrating to the host’s wife how to do it. She wanted to help and we wanted her help. This is something she could do.

 

 

This is a picture of a tie beam with a brace pocket. These hemlock timbers weren’t the friendliest timbers to work on.

 

 

The workshop area was large enough so we could have a nice tool table set up. In the foreground is my tool box. I found an empty Sam Adams box for one student to use to throw his chips into as he was cutting them off his tenon. Saves time at clean up.

The block on the timber next to the laptop is a small sample block that I did a “step lapped rafter seat” layout demo on. The shop teacher is in his office.

 

 

And due to the fact that I’m not the best kid in the class, as I was always telling “men from Maine” jokes; I got called to the office:

 

 

At the end of the day we all got together for a group photo:

 

 

They have been working on the design some.

And here are their cabin and frame ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

  



 

These will be modified some before the finish project is complete, for sure.

If you would like to get some face to face hands on training consider “hosting” a workshop.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Piston

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2013, 04:12:17 pm »
Great write up Jim! 

That barn looks like a nice place to work on timbers!  I like how they are going to have a large overhang on the back of the design for wood storage.  Are there any issues with storing firewood right next to the cabin like that?  Will it attract ants/insects that could eat away part of the wood siding? 

How are they connecting the shed rafters to the main frame? 
-Matt
“What the Lion is to the Cat the Mastiff is to the Dog, the noblest of the family; he stands alone, and all others sink before him. His courage does not exceed his temper and generosity, and in attachment he equals the kindest of his race.”

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2013, 04:35:50 pm »
Are there any issues with storing firewood right next to the cabin like that?  Will it attract ants/insects that could eat away part of the wood siding? 

How are they connecting the shed rafters to the main frame?

Quote
These will be modified some before the finish project is complete, for sure.

We have discussed the external brace into the post at length. They most likely will not do that. What I suggested was a bracket on the outside of the siding. So that if or when rain water rots the end of the brace to the bracket these can be easily replaced.

We discussed the three external braces going into a principal purlin instead of one to one connections with the rafter tails.

We're going to also modify the porch rafters once the exact size is determined due to the local snow load. The porch roof pitch maybe increased to shed the snow by moving the rafter connection up to the top side of the main rafters.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Online Peter Drouin

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Re: Timber Framing Weekend Workshop
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2013, 06:49:08 pm »
Good job Jim ;)
2008 LT40 super,2008 edger, Cat telahandler, JD 5410 And can cut up to 45' long
http://www.forestryforum.com/sanbornton     NH Timberland Owners Association supporter.
And a license NH soft wood grader.
Sawing since 1987