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Author Topic: Re-facing a rotten beam.  (Read 2687 times)

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Offline Rooster

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Re-facing a rotten beam.
« on: December 29, 2012, 10:41:02 pm »
Hey there,

I recently restored a large barn frame that had a few beams on the East end wall that had enough rot damage where it would be difficult to nail new siding to them, but not enough damage to warrant replacing the entire beam...and in the following case, this was a 8x8x42' hand hewn EWP tie-beam. (Not exactly something that you can "just knock-out in an afternoon".)

The following is the steps that I took to re-face the beam.

I first chose to remove a section of the outside surface of the beam at a depth of 2", so that I could then use a full 2x8 plank as a new surface for the siding to be nailed to.  I took two modern 2x4s and tacked them to either side of the beam, 2" down from the outer surface/ reference face, and used them as a guide or rail system to help me create a straight and flat plane.  I then cut the damaged portion every 12"-15" with my handsaw to the top of the 2x4s.
 

 

I then used a medium sized axe and rough hewd as close to the 2xs as I could.
 

  

 

I used my slick to flatten the surface using the outer 2x4 rails as a reference guide.
 

  

 

A new 2" board was then cut to fit as a new surface...the 2xs were removed, and the new board was fastened to the beam with spikes.
 

  

  

 

It took me 30 min. to resurface a 2in. thick x 20ft long section of  8x8.

Rooster
"We talk about creating millions of "shovel ready" jobs, for a society that doesn't really encourage anybody to pick up a shovel." 
Mike Rowe

"Old barns are a reminder of when I was young,
       and new barns are a reminder that I am not so young."
                          Rooster

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Re-facing a rotten beam.
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2012, 11:37:47 pm »
Nice job and method.
Thanks for posting.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Jay C. White Cloud

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Re: Re-facing a rotten beam.
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2013, 07:41:09 pm »
Hi Rooster,

Do you ever oblique cut in or toggle you "Dutchman" patches?  Do you ever use structural adhesives?

Regards,  jay
"To posses an open mind, is to hold a key to many doors, and the ability to created doors where there were none before."

"When it is all said and done, they will have said they did it themselves."-teams response under a good leader.

Offline jueston

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Re: Re-facing a rotten beam.
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2013, 04:28:33 pm »
my first thought after looking at the pictures was "why didn't he glue it?" but i realize that wouldn't be very historically accurate and might take something away from the restoration.

Offline Rooster

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Re: Re-facing a rotten beam.
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2013, 04:00:47 pm »
Hi Rooster,

Do you ever oblique cut in or toggle you "Dutchman" patches?  Do you ever use structural adhesives?

Regards,  jay

Jay,

Yes, I sometimes back-cut the patch, if it is in full view...these will be covered by siding and 15+ft off of the floor, so I wasn't worried...just needed to have a fresh face to create a solid nailing surface for the siding.

And no, I have not use adhesives other than epoxy inside concrete holes for hold-down bolts.   But who knows what projects in the future will call for something "Chemical"...eh?

Rooster
"We talk about creating millions of "shovel ready" jobs, for a society that doesn't really encourage anybody to pick up a shovel." 
Mike Rowe

"Old barns are a reminder of when I was young,
       and new barns are a reminder that I am not so young."
                          Rooster