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Author Topic: Circular Sawmill  (Read 19486 times)

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Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #60 on: September 17, 2012, 12:03:57 pm »
Guys, I have spotted a possible candidate for an engine.  About 3 miles from my house theres a lates 70's early 80's john deere combine with grass and trees growed up around it a country mile.  Good thing is I know the guy pretty good, but he likes to hang onto stuff.  I'll give it a shot and see how it goes.

Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #61 on: September 21, 2012, 04:06:50 pm »
Guys, I've got a couple of questions concerning the husk.  I spoke with a local bandmiller who is going to saw my beams for the husk.  I have both yellow pine and oak on my land.  Can someone give me a suggestion of which would be better.  And also, once the beams are sawed, do you assemble the husk while the beams are green or let them dry. Any help would be grateful.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #62 on: September 21, 2012, 07:13:09 pm »
I think if I had to choose I'd pick the yellow pine,oak is strong but not stable enough.You don't want to build it green.Best would be to have the pine milled oversize dried in a kiln  then recut to dimentions.If your not a purest a welded steel husk is better. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #63 on: September 26, 2012, 04:55:11 pm »
Does anybody have any suggestions for the piers used in the foundation of the old mill.  I was wondering if large cedar post every 4ft set in concrete would be sufficient with treated 4x6's for the track to bolt on.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #64 on: September 26, 2012, 09:18:56 pm »
Rossy,your a fairly young fella,if your planning for the long haul use cement,ether in sono tubes or in forms to look like a jersey barrior.Pressure treated would be a good idea unless your going to put a roof over it. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #65 on: September 29, 2012, 11:35:16 am »
I bought a power unit but cannot find any information on it what-so-ever.  It is a Waukesha 6 cylinder flathead.  All the sheetmetal,radiator, and hand clutch pto is there.  I have no idea what year it is, but it powered an old hammermill.  I bought from a co-worker fairly cheap because he said he needed the room to store more farm equipment.  It is in very good condition and would like more information on it. If anyone knows anything about these units, please let me know

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #66 on: September 29, 2012, 08:15:55 pm »
That Waukesha should make a good mill engine if it has enough displacement.I've owned and worked on waukesha engines, but all overhead valve.That flathead is probibly from the late 40's or 50's.I believe waukesha is still in business but into large stuff now,most of the stuff on them is genaric.Those old engines were noted for their torque, vital to a circular mill.All in all a good find. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Don_Papenburg

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #67 on: September 30, 2012, 11:17:25 pm »
I think that Oliver used them in some tractors , but I think that they were all overhead valve.
Frick saw mill  '58   820 John Deere power. Diamond T trucks

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #68 on: October 01, 2012, 12:03:45 am »
I think that Oliver used them in some tractors , but I think that they were all overhead valve.

Yes, they did.
No matter how much conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it is still the most popular type.

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Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #69 on: November 01, 2012, 01:45:20 pm »
My hunt for a diesel power unit is finally over.  A good friend of mine had a 318ci perkins diesel from a combine that he was going to use to pump water but never did.  I got it on a skid with radiator and fuel tank VERY cheap.  Engine is in good shape and runs good.  I'll try to post pics a little later.

Offline Woodchuck53

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2012, 04:18:47 pm »
Either of those units will be a good fit to start you on your way to spending more on your mill. You will find all kind oif things to fix and up grade. The Waukesha is and old oil field engine in our area so Reagan Supply from Morgan City, La. might be able to help. They should be in the book. Hope this helps. Chuck
Case 1030 w/ Ford FEL, NH 3930 w/Ford FEL, Ford 801 backhoe/loader, TMC 4000# forklift, Stihl 090G-60" bar, 039AV, and 038, Corley 52" circle saw, 15" AMT planer Corley edger, F-350 1 ton, Ford 8000, 20' deck for loader and hauling, F-800 40' bucket truck, C60 Chevy 6 yd. dump truck.

Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #71 on: November 09, 2012, 04:41:38 pm »
The power unit that I have has a sproket on the rear shaft that can be removed.  Building a pulley and attatching it to the shaft is no problem, but I dont know what size to build.  The mandrel pulley is approximately 24" round.  My question is what size pulley should I build to get the engine up to speed and be able to run the blade at 550rpm.  Also how do you measure blade speed to ensure that your running at the proper speed.  thanks for your help.

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #72 on: November 10, 2012, 12:25:37 am »
I can't remember for sure, but I think it's simple arithmetic. (Somebody correct me if I'm wrong). I think, if you double the diameter of the slave pulley, compared to the master pulley, you halve the speed. If you triple the size of the slave pulley, then you cut the RPMS to a third of the master pulley. So (for an easy example) if your engine output shaft is running at 2000 RPM, and you want your sawmill axle to run at 500 RPM, you need to make the pulley on the sawmill axle be four times bigger than the pulley on the engine output shaft.

 :P ::) I hope I did that right.
No matter how much conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it is still the most popular type.

"And if ye had been where i hae been, ye widna been sae cantie-o-- And if ye had seen wha' I hae seen, on the braes of Killiecrankie, oh!"

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline dblair

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #73 on: November 10, 2012, 09:48:19 am »
mine is a 23 on the arbor and a 10.5 on the engine , engine rpm is 1250 or so on a 48 inch blade for a blade rpm of 570 . my surface feet are around 7100 . that's a good wood speed .
old Appomattox Iron Works circle mill.

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #74 on: November 10, 2012, 09:57:25 am »
The RPM does not change with the diameter of the saw blade, btw, however a larger saw blade will have a higher tooth speed (feet per second) than a smaller saw blade at the same RPM.
No matter how much conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it is still the most popular type.

"And if ye had been where i hae been, ye widna been sae cantie-o-- And if ye had seen wha' I hae seen, on the braes of Killiecrankie, oh!"

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline steamsawyer

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #75 on: November 10, 2012, 12:16:05 pm »
Hey HPPDRoss,

Are we talking about a flat belt pulley on the saw shaft?

First find the engine speed... Divide the engine rpm by the arbor rpm, like maybe 2100 on the engine by 550 on the saw. That would be roughly 3.8 to 1... Now divide the 24" arbor pulley diameter by 3.8 and it will give you the engine pulley in inches. 24 divided by 3.8 = 6.3" 

I am only useing an engine speed of 2100 as an example for the math. If you have a low speed high torque engine things will work out better for you. Make sure to run your engine at its governed speed. If the rpm is higher the pulley has to be smaller and if the rpm is lower the pulley diameter would of course be larger.

The blade speed is critical, you have to keep within 50 rpm for the blade to stand up in the cut. You may need to go larger on both pulleys to avoid belt slipage. On a flat belt I would say a minimum of 10" on the engine pully might be necessary to avoid the slippage.

To the other extreme... My arbor pulley is 20" and my engine pulley is 42"... a ratio of 1 to 2.1... My blade is hammered for 500 rpm and my engine turns 250 rpm. That works out to 525 rpm on the arbor. Under load on the governor I can stay nearly dead on 500 rpm.
J. A. Vance circular sawmill, 52" blade, powered by a 70 HP 9 1/2 x 10 James Leffel portable steam engine.

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Offline SPD748

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #76 on: November 10, 2012, 12:40:51 pm »
My sheaves are 12" on the pto and 30" on the mandrel for a ratio of 2.5:1 I have a 56" saw and I'm told that 8000 fpm rim speed is a good medium so, 56/12 x pi = 14.64 ft (rim circumference). The desired rim speed of 8000 fpm divided by the saw circumference (8000/14.64) = 546 rpm. Now, with a 2.5:1 pto to mandrel ratio that means my engine will need to run (546 x 2.5) = 1366 rpm. I was planning on running at an even 1400 rpm (loaded) which will spin the saw at 560 rpm for a rim speed of ~ 8200 fpm.

-lee
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Offline HPPDRoss

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #77 on: November 10, 2012, 04:34:33 pm »
Thanks for the replies, that really helped me out alot because I had no clue.  Also can you use one of those hand held rpm gauges that looks similar to a fluke meter to read rpm's.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #78 on: November 10, 2012, 08:12:13 pm »
Hand held RPM gauges are very handy I use a Stewart Warner to check arbor speed.Have someone hold the gauge on the arbor wile your cutting to find how much droop or if you have belt slippage. Your wise to go diesel if possible as big old gasoline engines gulp gas. Frank C.
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Offline steamsawyer

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Re: Circular Sawmill
« Reply #79 on: November 10, 2012, 09:30:00 pm »
Here's what I use...

 

 

The black thing is a vibratory type tac, you rotate the face and it extends the wire in and out. You extend the wire to where you get the widest oscillation on the tip and read the scale on the dial. This tac is highly accurate but is best suited for higher rpm... 1000 rpm and up.

To use either of the other two you need access to the end of the shaft that you want to check. The Stewart Warner is direct reading by 100 rpm. You stick the pickup stem of the tack into the center hole of the shaft and read the dial. It can be used in either cw or ccw rotation. The other is a revolution counter that is used with a stop watch. I usually time for a full minute, its more accurate that way.

Alan
J. A. Vance circular sawmill, 52" blade, powered by a 70 HP 9 1/2 x 10 James Leffel portable steam engine.

Inside this tired old mans body is just a little boy that wants to go out and play.

Great minds think alike.....  Does your butt itch too?

Alan Rudd
Steam Punk Extraordinaire.