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Author Topic: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...  (Read 7526 times)

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Offline nebruks

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Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« on: May 13, 2012, 04:50:37 pm »
Wished to share with you some of my latest modified traditional Japanese Shou-sugi-ban (焼杉板) wood burning methods applied on my upcoming timber frame and log construction union. I am working with rough sawn spruce that I have been harvested by my own 2 years ago in winter time. I have made all the joinery and before putting it all together I am doing following.... As I am, if I can say that - a "surface addict", I wished to make my frame look rustic and more medieval. So the question of the surface is the question of the feelings you can get when entering in any house or barn. So impressed by Japanese Shou-sugi-ban I decided to burn all the frame with a gas flame, take the burnt surface between the fibers out with a simple hand wire brush and finally treat it with hot linseed oil. And I got two things - the surface I wished to see and a natural treatment for longevity that fire and linseed oil did. I will be rising up only the sills and posts, then will come hand hewn log infill and only after that I will be putting up girts and rafters. Will post some progress shots here. So here you can see the pictures from my work site with my wood burning experience.

"Burn the frame, before you rise it..."

















































Offline samandothers

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2012, 05:20:10 pm »
Interesting looking finish.   Oil sure does cause the water to bead.  I look forward to following your progress!

Offline AMB30518

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2012, 05:38:02 pm »
I like the dark look too.
Did you add something to the linseed oil to darken it also?
I bet it would make a nice frame contrast with some clean light colored tongue & groove ceiling and walls.
Thanks for sharing and I'll look for updates too.
I do some chainsaw milling, learning sketchup & timber framing for home projects but not an expert..... I learn as I go and go as I learn

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Offline nas

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2012, 07:20:44 pm »
That is cool 8)  I might have to try it on some timbers.  I bet it will give a unique smell to the frame too.
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Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2012, 10:42:04 am »
Will it give off an odor in the house? 
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
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Offline shelbycharger400

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2012, 11:04:26 am »
I'm curious the difference in application of hot vs room temp. oil.

Offline zelpatsmot

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2012, 12:27:45 pm »
Thanks for sharing, also curious about hot vs room temp oil.....
Even if that linseed takes months to flash it will be worth it.

Offline nebruks

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2012, 05:15:41 pm »
I like the dark look too.
Did you add something to the linseed oil to darken it also?
I bet it would make a nice frame contrast with some clean light colored tongue & groove ceiling and walls.
Thanks for sharing and I'll look for updates too.

No, the oil darkens by the burnt surface.

Offline nebruks

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2012, 05:19:06 pm »
Thanks for sharing, also curious about hot vs room temp oil.....
Even if that linseed takes months to flash it will be worth it.

Hot (almost boiling temperature) linseed oil reacts with the wood better and goes deeper inside between the fibers. After the oil dries there is some spots where it did not dry. So I was heating those spots with the gas flame and the oil went into the wood and dried completely.

Offline zelpatsmot

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2012, 09:54:08 pm »
How long did it take to dry? Other than the odd spot as you said.
I have to try this... Grateful of your post.

Offline Aikenback

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2012, 05:43:30 pm »
nice look. is there any documented preservative advantage?
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Offline wdncno

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2012, 09:15:12 am »
I've been doing this on interior projects, but using sunflower oil.  Leaves a really nice finish and does not mildew.

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2012, 09:59:44 pm »
Nebruks,
Are you aware that Makita makes a power brush?  It has wire brush, synthetic brush, and flapwheel heads available for it.   If you like the finish, it might save you a lot of labor.

http://www.timberwolftools.com/tools/makita/M-9741.html

Watch the video demo of this tool on the webpage.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
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Offline venice

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Be cautious....
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2012, 04:00:05 pm »
i am a bit late to this party but,

if you are using this technique of "aging" wooden surfaces, use all protective measures you can. Full body suit, respiratory protection, gloves, goggles and the best ventilation you can get.

While the result looks really good, the process is extremely unhealthy even with an hand wire brush. Motorized hand-held equipment makes the situation even worse.

The dust of burnt wood you are kicking up is so fine, it's clogging the pores of your skin, is crawling under your mask and again, is extremely unhealthy. Working a coal mine is a joke compared to brushing burned wood.

Have had the "Luck" to work on a project a couple years back that had wood burning/ brushing involved.

Next time someone ask me to do something like that, I'll turn around and walk away...

Even though i don't remember the details, a couple years back i read an article about cleaning up burnt forests. Not sure who brought it up, the author or the cutting crew, there was a major concern about health issues as well related to the black dust...

If you decide to use it anyway, you can skip the linseed or any other chemical treatment. The burnt surface will protect the wood from the elements better than anything. It's a ancient technique protecting wood, that has been used for ages.

Be safe. Venice

Offline K.B.

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2013, 07:08:53 am »
Just wondering if there is an update to this project, or if there is a burnt smell if used in the interior?

Offline creativecarpenter

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2013, 10:47:00 pm »
 

  


  


  


 
 I love the look of burnt wood! I definately plan on burning some or maybe all the timbers in my next home. posting a few pics of signs I made by burning the wood, brushing and sanding to highlight.
coming from the sawdust factory

Offline venice

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2013, 02:54:09 pm »
Sweet. Did you seal it?

Offline Aikenback

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2013, 01:36:13 am »
Maybe this is a good thread to explore other natural finishes as well. I am interested in the steel wool and vinegar aging technique. also, I have seen a video where extremely strong black tea was used. The steelwool and vinegar can be applied after where it reacts chemically with the tannins in the tea and the wood and "ebonizes" the fibers. It apparently turns the wood very dark. I am just wondering how these techniques hold up to uv etc. I am planning on trying all these techniques and applying some clear landark exterior finish with the fungicide and uv blocker over top. Is there any one out there that has tried these other methods?
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Offline S.Hyland

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2013, 10:56:13 pm »
Funny you mention that you mention the steel and vinegar technique. I am working on a White Oak frame right now that is using that. The first coat went on today, still too pale and blueish. So more coats will go on. I'll get some pics up in the next couple of days...
“It may be that when we no longer know which way to go that we have come to our real journey. The mind that is not baffled is not employed. The impeded stream is the one that sings.”
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Offline Aikenback

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Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2013, 10:49:46 am »
In the video I watched they used pickling vinegar, I dont know what difference it makes. When she added that mixture to the wood with the tea in it, it really darkened. I like the idea of actually changing the colour of the wood fiber rather than adding colour particulates for some reason.
no whining.