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Author Topic: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop  (Read 16600 times)

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Offline Bro. Noble

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2004, 07:03:37 am »
Be sure to replace the old ropes with modern synthetic rope.  The climbers can probably reccomend the right kind,

I think you can put a collar or knot or something in the rope so it makes the trolly think the load is all the way up.  You could locate it so that the trolly moves when the load is just above the level of the loft floor.  By incorperating a hand winch (come-a-long) or a chain hoist a few feet above the end of the lift rope,  you could allow for lifting different heights of loads.  And could set them to the floor gently.

Ya gotta have a team of mules to pull the lift rope though :D  That sure brings back memories.  Had a neighbor that used an electric motor and a capstan winch on the lift rope.

Somewhere there must be operators instructions for those setups------would be very helpful to you.  Probably some old-timers around that would be thrilled to show you how they worked.

If you could see our old barn (in my logo) better you would see that it is also made for loading loose hay.  If you could see, however,  sticking in the opening below is a portable grain elevator.  We use it for putting Small square bales in the loft. Used to use it in two different barns as well as stacking bales in a pole barn.  We put the hopper on it and used it with ear corn.  We have used it to put shingles on roofs and to build concrete block flues-------both to lift the blocks and as a scaffold.  It's 40 ft long and will lift (by hand crank and cable) to about 20 ft high.  
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Offline isawlogs

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2004, 08:10:19 am »
You could rigg an electric winch easaly to the trolly and use the winch for up down, and pull the load by hand in or pull it with a rope . We put a winch over at dads and use a rope tpull in the load ...We took the trolly off and oiled it good and do oil it every time we use it..
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Offline Corley5

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2004, 03:56:07 pm »
The following pics show what we've done to our old hay barn to make it into a workshop.  We poured a floor, added an upper floor with I-beams, 2X8s and 1" lumber, then insulated and sheathed the inside with chip board from the GP plant in Gaylord.  The I-beams are also going to double as shop crane.  We are going to put a trolley on each beam with another beam with a trolley and chainfalls to give a wide range of mobility.  The old barn also has a hay track in the peak and we framed in a trap door in the floor to use it along with a trolley and chain falls to get stuff to the second floor.  For heat we have a heat exchanger hooked to Dad's Heatmoor outdoor furnace.  It doesn't take long even at zero degrees and no heat in there for several days for it to warm up.  We put 8" of insulation in the ceiling and six in the side walls.  The total work area in the shop is about 24X32.  That about half of the barn with the other half being cold storage.  We had talked about building a new shop but decided we'd be better off utilizing one that we already had.  We also upgraded the power to a 200 amp service.  This is still a work in progress but we are almost done now.  Just have to finish painting and build some work benches.

The stairway to the second floor


The heat exchanger


Hay grapple/forks where they've been for as long as I can rember


Hay trolley where it's also hung for as long as I can remember


Trap door to second floor for lifting stuff with hay track


Last winters pic of the barn.  It doesn't look much diiferent this winter

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Offline D._Frederick

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2004, 04:11:37 pm »
Corley,

Nice job of building a shop in your barn, can you hide it from the tax assessor? How are you handling that cutting torch in a wooden building, my assurance agent would have a fit if he saw that?

Offline HP

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2004, 07:10:32 pm »
Here are some pictures of an elevator that I built in our house several years ago.  
between floors


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Offline Dave_Fullmer

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2004, 07:25:04 pm »
Boy, talking about that hay trolley sure brings back memories.  In 1949 when I was 12, I went out to a farm to help with the hay.  Got paid $1.00 per week and board and room.  Bernie had a big old barn on his 80 acres just outside of Big Rapids, MI.  He cut his hay with a horse drawn mower with a cut off tongue behind his B Allis Chalmers.  He raked it with a team of horses and a dump rake.  He taught me how to drive the tractor, and we picked up the hay with a loader behind the wagon.  When we got to the barn, we pulled the wagon into the barn from one side, unhooked the wagon and drove the tractor out the other side of the barn.  We would hook the barn rope to the tractor and off I would drive it to the end of the track we made.  It would take about 3 sets of the forks to get the hay off the wagon.  When it was off, we then had the big job of mowing it away.  If you didn't mow it back to the sides of the haymow, it would lay in big knots and be hard to dig out to feed the cows in the winter.  Bernie is now in his late 80's with altzimers but he and his wife still live on the farm.  I tried to buy his '51 CA that he bought new a few years ago, but he didn't want to sell.  I did buy his '55 WD45 WF and I am in the process of restoring it.

What good memories.  We sure worked back then.
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Offline Corley5

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2004, 08:35:18 pm »
So far the tax assessor hasn't noticed the improvments 8) ;) :D.  I always use the torches on the slab outside just to be safe.  Never had any thing said about torches in any wooden building.  Before they were here they were in the old shop across the road which is an old granary.
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Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2004, 09:54:00 pm »
holy cow !  great pictures Corley5 and HP and from all of you this is fantastic the interest in making a barn into a shop .I was gone all day , went on a 6 hour drive up by north shore of lake superior to get a few parts for my old R john deere and the man that sold the parts to me had a portable bandsaw sitting by his shop so I had me a looky up close and those bandsaws are neat, never seen one up close like that . I told him to become a member to the forum and I think he may ! I thought about my wild idea of wanting my woodshop up in the loft all day too and boy am I excited now after reading everyones replies. Tomorrow I will go really check out this track and carriage business and the trap door idea and look at the old rotten rope still hanging in the corner , my mind will be a buzzin with ideas now ! When I was a kid me and all my cousins would give suicide rides in the loft by having one kid hold the rope while we all pulled on the other end and cataupulted the kid hanging on it to the cieling and then hold him there until he started to scream , no wonder dad found us a old round baler ! we had too much fun up in the haymow ! nice barn/shop Corley5 and very cool elevator HP , great stories Dave F , good tips isawlogs,good instructions MinnesotaBoy , now I better do what Bro said and have a look at my old rotten rope , I am going to hook it up and just lift something very light and learn quick how this carriage thing works and report back . More pics and more stories I say !  ;D
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Offline Minnesota_boy

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2004, 05:03:10 am »
Be ready to really jerk on that rope when the load gets to the top so you can get it past the latch at the end of the track.  Otherwise, the load will lock at the top and just hang there and you'll be unable to bring it into the barn or lower it either.
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Offline Dave_Fullmer

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2004, 05:19:24 pm »
Yeah UncleBuck,
Minnesota boy is right about the jerking, but I would be also concerned about the latch being stuck from no use for "how many years?".  It would be pretty bad if you got a load up there and couldent get to it to get it unstuck.

Dave
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Offline amishboy

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2010, 02:51:01 pm »
Hey, Unclebuck, just a quick line to bring you up to date on my barn-to-house conversion.I to needed an elevator and I also decided to use a forklift for that purpose.I found an old Clark 24 volt forklift at TRW in Winona that had a blown drive motor, but the mast hdy's were in grade A shape. I paid 250.00 scrape value and had Bernies Equipment haul it to Holmen Wi for me , it cost me 85.00.I then installed twelve foot by five foot by twelve inch concrete slab, that cost me 400.00.I then rented a lull 4x4 and lifted the forklift into position. and that cost me 316.00. I am in the process of buying two sealed FGM solar batteries. The reason I chose these batteries is that they are setup for recharging by a solar panel, They also have no memory. I then link these batteries which are 12 volt in a series to produce the required 24 volts to run the forklift. These batteries are then charged and hooked to the solar panel and I never have to worry about a power outage. The batteries cost around 750.00, They should be good for about 15 to 20 years.I hope this will help you in your endeaver, If you have any more questions give me a call at 608-526-6690 any time of the day. thanks Amishboy.   

Offline beenthere

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2010, 03:21:12 pm »
amishboy
Welcome to the Forum.
You picked a 6 yr old thread, and Unclebuck is not with the Forum anymore.
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Offline KellyH

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #32 on: December 05, 2010, 09:25:45 pm »
Did it again!  Got to reading a thread and didn't even look at the date just enjoyed the information and kept reading.  :D  I was about to post information on how my uncle back home in Tennessee has built an elevator in their new home from an old Clark StandUp Forklift like the ones they use in grocery warehouses with narrow aisles when I seen it pointed out the age of the original thread.  A good story is a good story no matter how old or when it started.  In any case if you want to know how he did it I will call and get some details and maybe even a picture or two.  Happy Holidays!  ;)   
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Offline beenthere

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2010, 10:16:45 pm »
TurboMan
Would like you to do that  8)

I recall years back going through furniture factories that just had a moving continuous rope moving between floors with cross bars of wood every 6' or thereabouts. There was a hole in the floor above (similar to the hay chute used to get into the haymow and throw hay down) and you would just grab ahold of a bar and step on the next one and step off on the floor above or the next one, whichever. To go down, just move around the post to the same rope returning in the other direction. Step on, hang on, and ride down. The rope never stopped.

Simple, and seemed to work just great.
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Offline KellyH

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #34 on: December 05, 2010, 11:05:48 pm »
We have a local flour mill with that very same kind of thing.  It's just big enough to put a foot on and step over with the other foot.  The "Up" side isn't as scarey as the "Down" side.  Miss a beat and you get hit in the head with the next step coming your way.  Coornidated people only please. lolzzz  :D

I'll call my uncle tomorrow and see about getting some pictures and a description.

Happy Holidays Everyone!
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Offline mrcaptainbob

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Re: anyone ever make a elevator for a barn/shop
« Reply #35 on: December 06, 2010, 11:12:27 pm »
I lucked out. Big time. My younger son acquired a replaced elevator. My barn lofts are ten feet high. This outfit came to me in pieces and had to be assembled using the tell tale marks rubbed through the paint. Well, the main cylinder is a 4" by ten foot by 480 pound beast! The side rails are eight foot steel tee sections weighing 80 ponds each. There were some revisions needed to the cabling, but it works GREAT! There is no cage to it, but it did come to me with the base cage frame. Basically box tubing that formed an ell shape, where the floor is five feet wide and about four deep. THe standing part is also five wide and about five high. Since there's a ten foot span between lofts, I decked the cage frame with 2-by stock and sheet wood. I now have a four foot wide platform/cat walk from loft to loft. The hydraulics on this is so powerful that it will easily raise over a thousand pounds. Although I don't plan to use it for that. Another great use is it makes available an easy, height adjustable work bench. I can roll an engine block or trans on there and raise it to work height quite nicely. I really like the idea of the fork lift. Clever cabling and trussing will keep it well braced and safe. Good luck with yours.