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Author Topic: A nose for trees  (Read 57942 times)

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Offline Roxie

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #80 on: July 30, 2011, 08:02:07 am »
I'm about to show my ignorance in tree identification, but what kind of tree is that?   :-[
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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #81 on: July 30, 2011, 08:14:14 am »
I think it's a black spruce Roxie, but Jeff can verify.

Here's another. ;D



Looks like it's growing fur on the bottom half.  Cold you know. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline Jeff

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #82 on: July 30, 2011, 08:51:59 am »
That is was it is. A Black Spruce.  I didn't get photo's of the roots, but even those were burled up and pushing out of the ground.
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Offline Norm

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #83 on: July 30, 2011, 09:34:47 am »
I'm amazed it was still there after Burlcraft saw it.  :D

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Out on a Limb
« Reply #84 on: July 30, 2011, 10:14:08 am »
"Out on a Limb"

From: Ryerson Review of Journalism written by Bruce Tisdale (1999)

Every so often even the best writers become too enchanted with a story. They are captivated, and perhaps a wish not to disturb the tale causes them to overlook any faults that might be found by less involved observers.

In his book, Company of Adventurers, Peter C. Newman is at times a very enchanted writer. The book is the story of the Hudson's Bay Company and its crucial place in Canadian history. While the work is extensively researched, one prominent anecdote reveals a shining example of enchantment leading to error.

Newman presents the tale in the first page of his foreword. Two men were hiking in northern Saskatchewan far from any other human contact. One night as the pair were preparing their camp they noticed something glinting high in a spruce tree. One climbed the tree and brought down, "a weathered copper frying pan with the letters HBC still clearly stamped on the green patina of its handle. The two men had their dinner and sat around the campfire, cradling and examining the intriguing object, asking themselves why anyone in his right mind would have hung it 40 feet up a black spruce.

"In one of those moments of heightened sensitivity that sometimes telegraph the flash of understanding, the truth dawned on them simultaneously. They broke into smiles that collapsed into belly-pumping laughter. Of course. The frying pan, much like the one they had just used to make their meal, must have been hung on a sapling by some long-gone Hudson's Bay Company trader. It had inadvertently been left behind the next morning, and the little spruce quietly continued growing-and growing."

Anyone with any knowledge of trees might already see a problem. Unfortunately Newman didn't and continued to promote the story, which he saw as a "graphic reminder of how deeply the Hudson's Bay Company is woven into the memories and dreams of most Canadians."

Last Nov. 4 Newman again related the anecdote-this time on CBC Radio's Morningside. Listeners wrote in to point out that the frying pan could not have reached its position in the tree simply through the tree's growth.

One wrote that "spruce trees, in common with all other trees, grow from the top. A frying pan or anything else for that matter, attached to a branch five feet above the ground 200 years ago would still be five feet above the ground today no matter how high the tree had grown in the meantime." Another used examples to illustrate the point: "Old tap holes in maple trees don't migrate skywards. Old telegraph transformers along logging roads stay at transformer height. The tree house that you built as a kid probably seems lower now, not higher."

Tree experts agree with the letter writers. As Philip Brennan, management forester for York Region of the Ministry of Natural Resources explains, "The way a spruce tree grows is by extending new shoots from buds on the old branches. By late summer, the new shoots have formed their own buds, so they can't extend anymore. The shoots can't extend, so the frying pan can't move." Brennan says the possibility of the frying pan's transference from shoot to shoot would be "a small miracle if it happened once," but this method couldn't possible carry a frying pan 40 feet up a tree.

At the University of Toronto a similar tall tree story is told in second-year forestry classes. "We use it as a fallacy that people hear," says Dr. T.J. Blake, associate professor of forestry. "It's an old wives' tale that's been spread around."

Somewhere in northern Saskatchewan stands a black spruce that was almost a legend.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline WDH

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #85 on: July 30, 2011, 07:38:40 pm »
A porcupine did it  :).
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Offline Magicman

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #86 on: July 30, 2011, 07:50:02 pm »
Nope, Mikey did it.   :)
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #87 on: July 31, 2011, 07:49:24 am »
When a speaker or writer uses something like that I find I just about stop my thought travel with them untill I can check ot if its urban ledgen or not....Sometimes the illustration gets so good you can't rember what the main thing they were talking about even was....A wolf licking a frozen piece of bloody meat with a knife blade in the middle comes to mind....No proof it happened....I checked that out as soon as I got home, but don't rember why it told it....The skillet in the tree....thats good... :D :D  Tim
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Offline Coon

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #88 on: July 31, 2011, 07:34:22 pm »
Gosh Darn it, that's where I hid it in my former life.   :D  I couldn't remember where I had put it up and outta da way from dem dam baars.   ;D
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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #89 on: August 01, 2011, 05:43:11 am »
From the Author of the book mentioned above:

"When the HBC papers, now lodged in the Provincial archives of Manitoba, had been valued for insurance purposes before being transfers from London to Winnipeg in 1974, they weighed in at sixty-eight tons- not counting the old muskets, sextants and other paraphernalia that pushed the weigh even higher..........

One exhilarating moment for me was reading the journal entry by James Isham of York Factory in the 1730's in which he complains how the swarms of mosquitoes 'have visited the plague of Egypt upon us'-and then finding a mosquito carcass, bloated with English blood, squashed right onto the page."

 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #90 on: December 05, 2014, 08:22:47 pm »
Lets pull this one back up to the top.  Its been three years since its been active,  and there are a lot of new folks on here..  Here is one I saw while horseback riding somewhere, I can't recall which place now. 

     Evidently it saw the need to self graft.  Banjo
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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #91 on: December 05, 2014, 10:53:07 pm »
 

  

  

 
They do that sometimes :D
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Offline Magicman

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #92 on: December 06, 2014, 07:19:34 am »
 

 
A White Oak.
 

 
A Post Oak.
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #93 on: December 06, 2014, 07:55:30 am »
Peter do you know what kind of tree that is?  Glad they weren't cut down when the building was built.  Yours was a white oak wasn't it Lynn? 
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Offline BEEMERS

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #94 on: December 06, 2014, 12:35:21 pm »
Hey Jeff...that very first tree in this post...is it on old US-27 down by camp rotary on the east side of the road?
Also remember that tree we found on my property the one that had an obvious?......well you know what..you should come get a pic of that and post it..I remember where it was and I also know of a few trees that would be awesome in this post...get with me.

Offline Jeff

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #95 on: December 06, 2014, 01:00:22 pm »
Yup! That is the tree.  8)
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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #96 on: December 06, 2014, 07:41:29 pm »
Peter do you know what kind of tree that is?  Glad they weren't cut down when the building was built.  Yours was a white oak wasn't it Lynn? 




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Offline Magicman

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #97 on: December 06, 2014, 10:13:43 pm »
The top one is a White Oak.  The bottom one is a Post Oak, which is in the White Oak family.  Those trees live two doors down from me.
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Online SwampDonkey

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #98 on: December 07, 2014, 04:24:49 am »
Another common thing to see up here since we have big rocks, lots of moss on them at times and yellow birch. Yellow birch will germinate in the moss on a rock sometimes and the roots migrate down around the rock. Lots of times on old stumps that rot out to. The tree is on stilt roots. ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Banjo picker

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Re: A nose for trees
« Reply #99 on: November 25, 2015, 06:49:31 pm »
Here is a new tree with a nose.   

    Banjo
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