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Author Topic: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid  (Read 16369 times)

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Offline Phorester

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2006, 09:21:59 am »

What is the hemlock you cut used for? 

I've always heard it was prone to a lot of windshake, where the growth rings seperate, which makes it unusable for about anything.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2006, 09:36:04 am »
They use hemlock in Maine for pulpwood and stud wood. I've sat at a good restaurant near Oakfield and seen trailer load after trailer load go by in tree length form. A lot of it coming from New Brunswick.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Sawyerfortyish

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2006, 07:26:31 pm »
Were cutting some pretty good hemlock in around some nasty limestone cliffs and ledges. Some of the ravines I go about a half mile out of my way to get in to. Most all of the hemlock is used for barn siding the windshook stuff goes in the gang saw and made into 1x2 battens. At one time it was estimated that there was 1.5 million ft of hemlock on this farm. I've cut hemlock well over 40" dia and counted 380 growth rings in the butt of one. It took 4 trips with the timberjack to pull that one out. One thing that really blew my mind was when we stopped for lunch one day and sat down by a small hemlock that had been cut out of the skid road it was only about 4" dia but was 86yrs old by the growth rings :o

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #23 on: November 21, 2006, 06:24:37 am »
If it's shaded badly it looks like a young seedling and cut one off and count the rings it could be 50 years old, like some balsam fir grows in shade.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Phorester

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2006, 12:22:12 pm »
Goes to show that the size of a tree is more dependent on the growing space it has had during it's lifetime instead of its age.

That's the reason for thinnings, TSI, Crop Tree Release, Weedings, etc., etc.  Gives trees more growing space for better health and faster growth.

As I say under my State flag on the left.... can't have a healthy forest.............
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2008, 08:20:11 pm »
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Spreading in Vermont

A Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (HWA) infestation detected in southeastern Vermont last year is larger than first estimated.  According to Barbara Burns, Acting Chief of Forest Resources Protection for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation, the HWA infestation first came to the state last year by natural spread.  Since then it has been found in 12 locations in the towns of Vernon and Brattleboro.  Fortunately, a recently completed multi-agency survey of forests beyond the towns’ boundaries, showed no signs of HWA infestation.  A quarantine is in place in Vermont for hemlock seedlings and wood products.  Forest health managers there are looking at options for managing the HWA population.

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Offline Woolywolf

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #26 on: November 06, 2008, 08:16:40 pm »
I was recently up in the mountains, in the Boone area.  Many huge hemlocks stood dead.  It was sad to see.  Our local newspaper devoted an entire section to the hemlock wooly adelgid a few months ago.  Here are links for several articles: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/q/story/1226453.html, http://www.newsobserver.com/news/q/story/1226459.html, http://www.newsobserver.com/news/q/story/1226645.html.

One article said that researchers are releasing other non-native beetles into the smokies that prey on the adelgid.  It's seems like researchers are fighting fire with fire--not sure that's a good thing.


     

Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2008, 08:30:15 am »
You don't have much to worry about from the non-native beetles.  Unfortunately, neither do the HWAs.  There are at least three species of beetles being bred and released by researchers in several different institutions.  They have been studied to a great extent, and their only food source is the HWA.  However, although many thousands of these beetles have been released into the wild, none of them have been relocated after their release.  It will probably require a much larger breeding program than we can currently muster to establish a breeding population of the predatory beetles.  In the end, it will be our only hope.  Individual trees can be treated for HWA infestation with insecticides, as I described here, but the treatment is somewhat expensive, especially for larger trees, and it must be reapplied every 3-4 years.
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Offline Sawyerfortyish

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2008, 01:00:55 pm »
Since this thread was started more than 2 yrs ago I will say the Hemlock woods that I was working in at that time has come back and looks to be in real good health. I dont know what happened to turn things around from sick and dying to good looking healthy trees.

Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2008, 01:23:20 pm »
The hemlock has been totally devastated in the northwestern portion of my county, and I have yet to see an uninfested mature hemlock anywhere in the county.  I expect 90% mortality in the county within another 3-4 years, much like what has been seen in Virginia and North Carolina :-\.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2008, 01:31:13 pm »
A friend of mine used to work at V-Tech and some of his work involved HWA in Virginia and NC. More involved with SPB though.

I don't see any fir adelgid (balsam woolly aphid) in my lot , but it's in some Christmas trees further south. Our government probably won't spend too much on HWA as the species is not highly valued here. In my area it has been over harvested the last couple generations. I doubt if you googled it, that it would show up in any research in NB.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Roxie

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #31 on: November 07, 2008, 01:36:23 pm »
My Mom lives in Sparta NC, and she was telling me last week that she had a tree guy come and treat her Hemlock.  She thought it was pricey, but she loves the trees. 

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #32 on: November 07, 2008, 01:43:29 pm »
The best hemlock I see in my area grow on lower slopes of sugar maple ridges. Any growing along wetlands are mostly junk. There is a nice bunch down along the drive to town across the creek mixed in with the maples and yellow birch. The only other farms I know of in my local area with them are also hardwood forest, dominated by sugar maple. We had 2 or three here one time, they were also in maple woods.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #33 on: March 08, 2011, 08:16:13 pm »
HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID WEBINAR

11:00 on Thursday, 10 March 2011
http://breeze.msu.edu/eab- university

Bradley Onken, forest entomologist from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, in Morgantown, W. Va., will present an overview on Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, during this week's EAB University webinar.

The webinar will be held on March 10, 2011, at 11 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. Go to http://breeze.msu.edu/eab-university to join the webinar on that day. The meeting room will be opened by 10:45 a.m.

~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2012, 03:43:40 pm »
MDA NEWS RELEASE

Editor’s Note: An interview-style video will be available for download at www.youtube.com/MIAgriculture after 2 pm today.
 
For Immediate Release: April 4, 2011                             
Media Contact: Jennifer Holton, 517-241-2485 or holtonj@michigan.gov
                                                                                       
Exotic Hemlock-Killing Insect Found in Berrien County
Infestations confirmed in New Buffalo
 
LANSING - Today, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) confirmed an infestation of the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) in Berrien County. This is the first confirmation of HWA in Berrien County.
 
HWA is a small, aphid-like insect that uses its long, siphoning mouthparts to extract sap from hemlock trees. Native to eastern Asia, HWA was discovered in Virginia in 1951, and has since spread over an area from Georgia to Maine, decimating hemlock stands across much of the eastern U.S.  Heavy infestations of HWA have killed trees in as little as four years.
 
The initial positive site in New Buffalo was discovered by an alert landscaper who reported his suspicion to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR).  DNR informed MDARD which initiated a survey of all hemlocks trees within a half mile of the positive site and   second positive site was discovered. Surveys will continue in the area to determine the full extent of the infestations.  Minimally, infested trees will be removed and destroyed; and hemlock trees in the area surrounding the infested trees will be treated with an approved insecticide.

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Offline WDH

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2012, 11:50:04 pm »
I hope it works, but it is probably like trying to plug the dike by sticking your finger in the hole.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2012, 06:41:15 pm »
Researchers Seek Fix for Destructive Bug

Central Daily.com (April 11) - Pennsylvania's state tree-the eastern hemlock-is threatened by a bug in about three-quarters of the state's counties.

Local farmers hope to draw attention to the problem, and Penn State researchers are working to find a natural enemy to combat the bug-the hemlock woolly adelgid.

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Offline darty

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #37 on: April 18, 2012, 08:19:48 pm »
I've got them around the house. I first noticed them on my hemlocks about 2 years ago.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #38 on: July 19, 2016, 12:16:11 pm »
Hemlock Die-Off Having Major Ecological Impact in Smokies
   
        (Townsend, TN - July 12) - Forests throughout the Great Smoky Mountains National
        Park are undergoing a major ecological shift due to the widespread deaths of
        hemlock trees caused by the hemlock woolly adelgid, an invasive species that was
        discovered in the park in 2002.
http://www.local8now.com/content/news/Hemlock-die-off-having-major-ecological-impact-in-Smokies--386425661.html

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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Hemlock Wooley Adelgid
« Reply #39 on: June 08, 2017, 12:55:04 pm »
RE:  HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID QUARANTINE

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) has established the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Interior Quarantine to protect Michigan’s native and cultivated hemlock trees from hemlock woolly adelgid.  On 5 June 2017, MDARD Director Jamie Clover Adams signed the quarantine which will go into effect on 5 July 2017. The HWA Interior Quarantine regulates movement of hemlock within Michigan, whereas the pre-existing HWA Exterior Quarantine already in place will continue to regulate movement of hemlock from out-of-state sources. Questions regarding the two HWA quarantines may be sent via email to Mike Bryan, Plant Industry Specialist at bryanm@michigan.gov or by fax to (517) 335-4540.

Michael Bryan
Plant Industry Specialist
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
Desk: 517-284-5648
Mobile: 517-449-9435


~Ron