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Author Topic: Tending your little piece of earth  (Read 40104 times)

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #120 on: December 09, 2013, 05:11:47 pm »
Yes I agree. Know the silvics of the trees your pruning and how they grow on your site. That is why I have a min and a maximum size to focus on, also limb diameter for me is important because fir does not heal up as fast as pine.  I am only interested in the but log to 10 to 12 feet. I would go higher, but to reach the size to be worth while to me I would have to live longer. Plus if I prune too much I'm loosing wood growth. I want to cut the limbs that are dead or beginning to, not the ones taking the full sun. In another 4 years I am going to do a second cruise, the first was in 2007 with 2.5 cord/acre. My plots were circular in thinned areas, so my density was known before hand as 1000 per acre and everything was tallied. Whereas a normal cruise I would only count 4" trees and bigger. Softwood can hold dead limbs for 2 or 3 decades, meanwhile making knotty wood and more chance of rot. And if you haven't got it yet, I'm pruning for me, not someone else. These are my logs. haha ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline WDH

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #121 on: December 09, 2013, 08:57:05 pm »
Keeping the core small is key in pruning.  Otherwise, you just wasted time and a lot of money.  I pruned 10 acres of loblolly pine after the first thinning at age 13.  Pruned up to 18'.  That was in 2000.  Now they are going on 27 years old and look nice except for the portion of the stand that has annosum root rot  :).  No matter what you do, nature has her way. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline tonich

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #122 on: December 28, 2013, 02:32:02 am »
Nice looking pruned fir trees, SD!
Valuable logs they will become.  8)

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #123 on: April 01, 2015, 12:14:25 pm »
I have been pruning now for a couple years in my firs. Late last week I bought a Fiskars Power Tooth 10" pruning saw, well I might have 4 hours on it and the blade shattered today, in two places at once. The tip and back where it enters the handle. Well I won't use that brand again. More Chinese junk at Canadian Tire, and reviews on Amazon reflect same. So instead I ordered up a BAHCO 396-LAP Laplander Folding Saw, blade made in Sweden from good steel. Good reviews. I'll be fighting back this time. :D The fir are healing up in 2 years. A 4"-8" pruned fir grown to 20" has a lot of clear wood in a 12'-16' log. A 4" fir is about 25-' tall. If I was to sell clear fir logs, they pay no premium in these parts. I see nothing in their specs sheets. Only how many knots are allowed over the length and size of knot.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #124 on: April 09, 2015, 04:53:53 pm »
Things will change in 20 years. Maybe even for the better. ;D :snowball:
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #125 on: April 09, 2015, 05:42:48 pm »
Not up here. It's ok to dream, but nope. :D These will be for my use only. Then if I switch gears by then, I'll just stand and look at'm. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Banjo picker

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #126 on: April 09, 2015, 08:27:03 pm »
Nice thread SD keep it going....nice variety of trees you got on that piece of ground....Banjo
Cooks AC 36--Prentice 210C--Morgan edger--Kubota M7040 with loader--Case 580 K with extendahoe--Case 850C dozer--Int 1700 series twin cylinder dump/log/flatbed truck--logging arch--2 logrite mill sp.--Cat claw sharpening system--And a bulldog to make sure it all stays here.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #127 on: April 22, 2016, 01:29:01 pm »
This attached Google Earth .KMZ file takes you to the woodlot.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #128 on: April 22, 2016, 06:00:05 pm »
No experience with softwoods but planted 750 Red oak in tubes interspersed with Scotch pine and Norway spruce for competition  1995 and 96.
Was busy with consulting for the first 10 yrs so neglected the plantation on about 11 acres.
I hired a young fellow with a Husky pole pruner 3 summers ago to prune and he did a fair job as some scars were 2 3 inches in dia,
The larger ones are now about 3/4 closed.
If I knew then what i know now all would have been Norway as these are taller than the oak as are the worthless Scotch pine.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Tending your little piece of earth
« Reply #129 on: April 22, 2016, 07:38:54 pm »
I have found red oak even to be slow compared to yellow birch. I planted both species, oak from acorns and birch from seedlings (had nursery grow from seed I collected) about the same time. The oak have lots of light in the open and the birch are 3 times their size, canopy over the top to walk in under like a park. Both on soil like in a garden. But I also have 4 or 5 red spruce I planted near by, and they are very slow compared to white spruce that are 3 times as big, same soil.  ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry