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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881336 times)

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Offline Norm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #860 on: January 23, 2005, 06:21:56 am »
I really enjoy this thread it's one I always check. Thanks Ron for all the great pictures. :)

Marcel what kinds of logs were you guys hauling?

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #861 on: January 23, 2005, 07:34:15 am »
Thanks Norm. The Thread seems to get a lot of interest. I enjoy the posts and photos of others here also. Marcel is now showing some of the hard work and effort that goes into winter logging and trucking.
~Ron

Offline isawlogs

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #862 on: January 23, 2005, 08:32:30 pm »
  Norm ...
  Depending on which sector we were in . We had a login radius of give or take 175 kilometers from the log yard which was at Tee Lake , small logging town 20 kilometers from Témiscamingue in Québec .
We would haule pine , spruce and balsam , poplar , and mixed hard wood .
The pine was tree lenght so was the pulp , but the hard wood would of been cut by slasher in the bush , had 2 slashers going at it 24 hours .
I'll go back on the photos that I put on and write down what type of wood was being drawn out ...
 I worked for this logging  outfit for 5 winters , it was at the time one of the largest privatly owned and operated logging companie in the province .
  We had during the peak winter months over 175 people on the payroll . Went from goffer , cooks, kitchen helper , mecanics , want to be mecanics , operaters, dozer, shovel ,skidder,back hoe, front loader, slasher , log loaders ,maintenance crew, welder , grader operator , truck drivers , and then all the office folks ... we had 2 foresters on and all the crew for the marking and blazing of the roads and trees to be cut down ...
All this in three different camps that where spreads out the logging terrotory...
all the camps had sleeping quarters , full kitchen dinning area
One camp we had for the trucks to have a home base and had the garage
The other two where ... one for the cutting crew , the other was for the road maintenance crew ... Sanders grader loaders the shovels once the cutters where done in one sector we would move into there camp and they would take ours ....
 
A man does not always grow wise as he grows old , but he always grows old as he grows wise .

   Marcel

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #863 on: January 25, 2005, 06:04:17 pm »
Some more wood hauler names noted on the road.

"Blackfoot"
"Tree Hugger"
"Red Hot And Rolling"
"Doc"
"Big Woody"
"Waxy"
"Scooby Duty"
~Ron

Offline 1953greg

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #864 on: January 25, 2005, 09:31:57 pm »
i use a f-250 pu and 16' utility trailer w/ front mounted 4 ton winch. i fabricated a quad pod that attaches to rear of trailer that supports a pully bout 5' above trailer floor. i back trailer to big end of log, run cable through pully and attach to log bout 1' from near end then detach truck and begin winching. trailer will rear up til tail hits ground then log and trailer will come together then log wil raise onto trailer. then remove quad pod and reattach cable to log couple times to bring log farther onto trailer. as log is winched/loaded trailer will come down slowly. better have trailer chucked!  works really easy, kinda like a rollback wrecker.  i can haul up to a single 36" 17' log. thats about 5000lbs and thats all i need.  not much for production but for a hobbist/weekend warrior its great.  small potatoes compared to you guys.  1953greg  
good day    greg

Offline isawlogs

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #865 on: January 26, 2005, 12:14:18 am »
1953greg
 Its not the amount of potatoes thats in the plate that counts .... trust me I would of being a lot less stressed out hauling your load .... ;)  And having a lot more fun ...
 Its what you get to do with whats in the plate ....
Feel free to put some pictures on , we love to see what others do ....
Oh and by the way welcome aboard , it is the first time I see you here ...
A man does not always grow wise as he grows old , but he always grows old as he grows wise .

   Marcel

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #866 on: January 30, 2005, 03:42:10 pm »
I have a question for Ron S and those up in the area. I ahve been seeing alot of posts in here of thinning red pine. I was wondering if the natural red pine stands are growing in soil that tend to be reddish (iron rich). In New Brunswick the natural red pine grows on iron rich podzols. Of course we have red pine planted on darker soils of farmlands but I'm not counting those sites. I'm just curious.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #867 on: January 30, 2005, 05:43:34 pm »
Swamp,

Much of our red pine here is on a well drained sandy soil. a lot of it is rubicon sand which is quite a sterile sand. If you have ever read the book, "The Lands That Nobody Wanted" that's where a lot of our red pine was planted, especially during the CCC era. Much of this is on National Forest and State Forest system lands.

There is also a lot growing on abandoned farm lands  which may be a darker sandy loam or loam soil.

~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #868 on: January 30, 2005, 06:27:55 pm »
These soils are sandy clay loams with a clay dominated C (compact) horizon. They tend to be real snotty in the rainy season. The soil on the farm here is more sand dominated sandy-clay loam and dries fast after a heavy rain.Our sandy soils are dominated by jackpine-black spruce boreal-like forests.

As I said earlier I was most curious. I find it curious as to why our red pine prefer those soils over the more fertile humo-ferric or brunisols in our area. Well I have the answer, partially, those richer soils where dominated by hardwood which are more shade tolerant and longer lived than red pine. I never seen a red pine in a hardwood stand. ;)

BTW, I never heard of that book. Sounds interesting if not just for its historical content.

What is the CCC era? clear-cut carve and concrete? Remember I'm just a pour old northern hick not that well versed in the local abbreviations. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Minnesota_boy

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #869 on: January 30, 2005, 07:37:21 pm »
Red pine will tolerate a lot of different soils, from sand to clay to mostly rock, but they do like sunshine.  We planted a few seedlings in our grove.  The ones on the south side against a field are 20+ feet tall, but one that was planted the same day but near some aspen that partially shaded it is only about 4 feet tall.  Same soil type.
I eat a high-fiber diet.  Lots of sawdust!

Offline BW_Williams

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #870 on: January 31, 2005, 12:18:17 am »
Just trying to post a pic, load of English Walnut I got the other day.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #871 on: January 31, 2005, 07:45:02 am »
Minnesota Boy:

I've also noticed red pine growing on rock cut faces along highways. You'd wonder how a tree can grow from solid rock. I suppose there is soil washed down into crevasses and the rock would be impermiable to water so it would hold there as well.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #872 on: January 31, 2005, 04:32:55 pm »
Have few pictures of a harvest taking place on my old stomping grounds growing up.  The land was sold by all the local farmers to Crabbe Lumber who is contracting the harvesting to RA Pheeny Logging and Trucking Company.

The harvesters are mounted on 2 escavators and a pair of huge JD grapple skidders are dragging all the bunches back.  A cable skidder crew is working the area next to the stream as it is too steep.


Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #873 on: January 31, 2005, 04:34:09 pm »
The hill they are working the cable skidder on and the dozer for road repair.  The skidder sits outside the stream buffer area and drags cut trees out of the buffer area to the skid road.  The clearcut part is about 1000 acres or so now and growing.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #874 on: January 31, 2005, 04:48:13 pm »
Slowzuki,
Was just wondering if you see Gary Goodwin or Marc Blanchard superviing the job. I don't know if they travel that far south. Just curious. I worked with Marc a few years before he went to Crabbe Lumber.

cheers

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Frickman

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #875 on: January 31, 2005, 07:24:55 pm »
SwampDonkey,

CCC stood for Civilian Conservation Corps. It was a "make-work" program run by the government here in the states to put out-of-work men to work during the Depression. They lived in camps and planted trees, built roads and campgrounds, and other did other things to improve government land holdings.
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

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Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #876 on: February 01, 2005, 08:37:04 am »
I have not met either but Marc Blanchard has a connection.  Our property has a Crown Reserve Road beside it.  The reserve was trimmed from our property back in the day but has alway remained with our land.  Our fields extend onto it and there is a 200 year old fence on the far side of it.

As a note for others, a Crown Reserve Road is a 66ft wide right of way owned by the Crown / Goverment for potential development.  People can apply to develop it but it is public land and can't be gated.

Crabbe built a road next to the reserve so they could gate it.  The problem is they hit a swamp and needed to divert onto what was part of our property at least on paper.  Marc came to visit our friend who owned the land at the time said sure but he didn't think he owned back that far.  A trip to the registry office showed he had been paying tax on it since 1946 when he bought the front parcel.  St. Anne Nackawic came to visit him and did a boundary adjustment.  He agreed they could have the land back if the taxes where paid back.  Well the lawyer came and they got the land back, but he never got his taxes back.  We bought the front part of the land after that and he passed away this spring.

So now St Anne is in bankruptcy, he never got his taxes back, we don't have as much land as what was described to us when we bought it and that is it!

I'm thinking about tracking down the history on it to see who really should have title to it.

Slowzuki,
Was just wondering if you see Gary Goodwin or Marc Blanchard superviing the job. I don't know if they travel that far south. Just curious. I worked with Marc a few years before he went to Crabbe Lumber.

cheers

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #877 on: February 01, 2005, 10:46:59 am »
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

http://www.cccalumni.org/history1.html
~Ron

Offline racer9

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #878 on: February 01, 2005, 02:56:03 pm »
A couple of log hauler names around here,
"unchained"
"termite"
"toad"
"grumpy" ;D
Husky 345, Husky 55 rancher, Husky 372xp, Husky 288, Husky 395xp

Offline tnlogger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #879 on: February 02, 2005, 02:48:13 pm »
well lets see if this works  :D this is the HD6E we've used for years. this thing will go places a billy would be scared to  gene
gene