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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881323 times)

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Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #820 on: January 13, 2005, 12:58:47 pm »
 Slowzuki, yeah the tractor is made by some weird Japanese company, it doesn't run nearly as smooth as the larger Perkins powered Masseys. If we went the tractor route we'd be using the wider flat profile tires that you were talking about, we also thought of using those industrial tires. We would put a farmi winch on the tractor and not a trailer. The trailers are a bit pricey for us and also they probably wouldn't work really well on our land. Those powered trailers are pretty cool though. I'd like to get a machine that can be used to for more than just logging. We could use the tractor for plowing snow, bush hogging, yard work and launching the boat in the river. A dozer could be used for road building, stumping and other such work. A J5 is really handy for getting way back in the woods especially if your taking some cargo. I'm not sure whered youd get parts for those old rigs though. We have a mixed woodlot with mixed terrian. Some of it is fairly solid and flat. There are some decent hills and there are some real wet areas. The timber consists mostly of old growth spruce. there's also birch and maple and a fair bit of cedar.

Offline JN68

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #821 on: January 13, 2005, 05:16:28 pm »
Hi Scott; i use a 70 hp 4x4 massey/ 8800lbs winch,405 patu log loder with home made power trailer( older masseys have ground speed match up too a two speed rearend 10-20 tires) no trans and pto running at a fast speed.I have a 420 case dozer ,used it some for yarding ::)all i can say is slow,rufffffff rideand watch out for wood in the tracks( they like too come off ).Hall's has a nice IH winch,chains roll bars for the woods.Oh about that cedar?? ;Dhow much? JN

Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #822 on: January 14, 2005, 08:37:00 am »
If you go tractor, I've had great luck driving through swamps on our property in the colder months, they freeze up ok and with snow packed down they bridge the wet holes ok too.

I wouldn't get the regular industrials, they don't work well in mud.  Michillen makes a wide style radial industrial carcas with the R1W tread on it.  This gives the deeper lugs and sharper V.  
http://www.michelinag.com/agx/en-US/products/product_detail_pages/XM27UI.jsp

There was a Kubota M4900 (45 hp) 4x4 tractor for sale in Moncton with a winch and dozer blade on it, FOPS on tops and full skid plating recently.  I'll try to dig up a link.

Quote
 we also thought of using those industrial tires. We would put a farmi winch on the tractor and not a trailer.


Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #823 on: January 15, 2005, 06:35:46 am »
 I've seen the tractors that you guys mentioned. I'd probably want to set the tractor up a lot like that, except i wouldn't want that little skidder blade. I'd want a decent loader on it instead, theyre just too handy not to have one. JN, if ya like I can show you around the woodlot, your proabably only a 10 minute drive from here.

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #824 on: January 15, 2005, 06:46:33 am »

JN, is this the machine you were talking about?

Offline buck5611

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #825 on: January 15, 2005, 08:28:54 am »
Check this link:   http://www.payeur.com/
look for "The Forester" A medium 4WD Kioti tractor especially rigged for forestry work. they sell a lot of it and they are very reliable tractor. Carol

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #826 on: January 15, 2005, 12:45:23 pm »
Sawyer Cuts Variable Lengths The tree lengths skidded from the lowland area are bucked into product lengths on high ground to prevent excessive rutting in the lowland. They will then be forwarded to the landing for trucking. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.


~Ron

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #827 on: January 15, 2005, 04:11:32 pm »
 The problem we have with smaller tractors is that they don't have enough weight for skidding some of the large trees on our land. The Forester tractor is a really good setup, i got to look at one a couple years ago at the forestry show. Do they come any bigger then the one they show?

Offline JN68

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #828 on: January 15, 2005, 07:59:12 pm »
HI SCOTT; yes that is the one, not a bad setup other then it being a  IH they don't like the cold. The massey that i use has the rear tires loaded chains on all four, we have steep hills and then your in the wet ground.We haul five trees (soft wood) most of the time. No problems, i don't like to make too much of a mess thier needs too be a future? Like to take you up on the tour someday always wanting to learn.  ;D JN

Offline buck5611

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #829 on: January 15, 2005, 08:12:26 pm »
Yes you can have a bigger one rigged like the forester.Carol

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #830 on: January 15, 2005, 10:21:38 pm »
I have been glued to this thread for over two hours and have learned a lot. Really enjoyed the heli pics as I was involved in it for five years. Hanks Truck Pictures has a lot of terrific logging truck shots. Swamp Donkey and Paul will feel right at home.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #831 on: January 16, 2005, 07:06:27 am »
 Hanks is a great page, there's some good shot from up on the oilfields. Check out the Ron Grieve collection.
 I'd like to get a New Holland TN 65 or 75 and put one of those forester packages on it.
 

Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #832 on: January 16, 2005, 06:20:25 pm »
 Tractor finally came in, we traded a 33 hp MF for a 5860 Landini.


Here the whole package.


I'm hoping this tractor will be heavy enough to handle 1/2 cord of wood. The massy was a great upgrade from a 350 big bear 4x4. But just didn't have the weight to move wood.
Ed K

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #833 on: January 16, 2005, 07:48:00 pm »
The 230A Timberjack Forwarder. The variable lengths are picked up on high ground and forwarded to the landing and decking area. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.


~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #834 on: January 17, 2005, 04:37:10 am »
I was wondering how a system of manual felling and bucking along with a 230A forwarder wood work. If ya have the operator/owner of the machine participate in the bucking process, I think you could put up quite  a bit of wood in a day. The quality of the wood would be higher than if machine cut I would think, no pull-out and such. Problem might be when the owner/operator gets too comfy in that seat. Both fallers would have to have good experience with directional felling. Too often I see in the woods are guys that let'r fall where ever. That doesn't matter much when clearcutting, but with reagards to improving the woodlot one has to use directional felling. If the odd tree got hung the forwarder could be called in to give the butt a quick jerk. Any soft ground could be buffered from the harvest with ribbons, which possibly may be part of wetlands anyway. Buffers on wetlands here start at their outter edges, not measured from stream-side.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #835 on: January 17, 2005, 05:23:41 am »
 I've been told that a manual chopper and a forwarder, will have all the work they could possibby do. This is why I upgraded to the equipment shown above. Last week with the addition of this equipment, I signed a contract for a thinning & logging job that will keep it busy for the next 2 yrs. A lot of the thinning I do, the land owner is looking for minimal signs of equipment. With a 230 forwarder, you could work both sides of the low impact idea. Manual cutting or work behind a processor. Work either way you look at it.
Ed K

Offline Frickman

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #836 on: January 17, 2005, 07:33:43 am »
Swampdonkey,

As to your question, it depends on the terrain. Most of the ground I work on in the mountains I do like the loggers Ron Scott showed did, I skid the logs out to an in-woods landing and then forward them to the roadside. It would be nice to take the forwarder to the stump, as you suggested, but it is pretty near impossible for me to do. Of course, their are places in the upper-midwest where this is a common practice.

When skidding the logs to my in-woods landing I rarely pull them tree length. Most logs are cut apart into mill-ready lengths right at the stump, and only short, sixteen foot maximum, logs are skidded. This gives me the advantages that a forwarder has in that I'm not causing alot of damage to residual trees. The logs are going to be cut-to-length anyway, so I might as well do it at the stump.

I don't need a large area for an in-woods landing either. Any wide spot along a woods road that will hold a thousand or so board feet will do.

By using the skidder and forwarder together, and adapting to the terrain at hand, I can harvest timber efficiently and still keep the foresters happy.
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

I'm not a hillbilly. I'm an "Appalachian American"

Retired  Conventional hand-felling logging operation with cable skidder and forwarder, Frick 01 handset sawmill

Pretend farmer when I have the time

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #837 on: January 17, 2005, 08:57:36 am »
 Nice tractor Ed! We have an older version of your MF that you traded and we're having the same problem with it (not enough weight) I think i'm going to have to look at the Landinis before i do any buying  :). your tractor is pretty much exactly what my dad and I are looking for.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #838 on: January 17, 2005, 10:53:42 am »
Frickman:

I could see the advantages of the skidder in that situation and I like the idea of bucking to length in the bush to reduce damage. I'm just on the edge of the Appalachian range here and the land is farely flat for logging, but rolling. I've seen some folks try to fight the terrain and skid long length and bulldoze skid trails all over the side hills. What an erosion mess they make. The ground is either gravelly or shaly, at any rate, makes a real mess. They should either avoid using that method on that ground or find an alternative. The environment doesn't seem to make waves over it, which is surprising since that silts up the streams below in a heavy rain. ::) Sometimes we don't have the luxury of picking and choosing our job sites I guess, especially with high equipment lease payments. Oh, if everything was perfect. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Frickman

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #839 on: January 17, 2005, 03:39:41 pm »
Swampdonkey,

You mentioned high-lease payments. My method of logging will not work profitably if you have high payments. It does work real well if you care about the land however. The way I log is alot slower than tree-length logging for several reasons. I care about what I'm doing, and take my time doing it. I'm obviously pulling out less footage per trip than a large skidder dragging tree length. And I'm moving alot of work that I'd be doing at the landing or mill back to the stump. This saves some time down the line though, especially at clean-up time. I leave most of the loose bark, sawdust, knots, end trims, etc. back in the woods where they belong, instead of hauling them to the landing or mill yard. It helps keep the landing and mill yard neat and tidy.

The one thing that I've learned over the years about logging is you have to be adaptable. Just as one prescription for harvest will not work on every tract you mark, one certain method of logging will not be feasible on every job I work. All my equipment is paid for, so it works for me, I don't work for it. Since I don't have a loan payment bearing down on me every month I'm able to do things a little different than some other outfits.
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

I'm not a hillbilly. I'm an "Appalachian American"

Retired  Conventional hand-felling logging operation with cable skidder and forwarder, Frick 01 handset sawmill

Pretend farmer when I have the time