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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880879 times)

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Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #800 on: November 28, 2004, 03:20:35 pm »
nothing like getting to the job site and finding out your batt. won't work in the camera  >:( :( :'(.
Ed K

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #801 on: November 28, 2004, 03:35:36 pm »
Ed :D Do you use rechargeables. Them regular lithiums are expensive when ya use the onscreen display often :(

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #802 on: November 28, 2004, 04:52:05 pm »
Murphy's Law with the batteries. I now always carry extra batteries and/or a second camera since this happened to me when some photos where very important as evidence in a timber trespass and damage case.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #803 on: December 04, 2004, 04:32:36 pm »
Final Grading of the Access Road. The cable skidder is used to make a final grading of the constructed access road prior to closure of the timber sale. The loggers leave the landowner with a good access road to the back end of his property.

The constructed access road will serve the landowner's continued land management needs and increase future timber values. Lee timber harvest; 10/04.

[
~Ron

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #804 on: December 16, 2004, 06:48:28 am »
 Here's a few shots from around here.

690E excavator converted to tree harvester.

450 skidder hauling through the old field.

equipment at the landing

truck getting ready to leave the field.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #805 on: December 19, 2004, 04:35:26 pm »
Hmmm, the most recent post musta been deleted cause I received notice through email and I don't see it on here. Oh well, I missed it. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #806 on: December 19, 2004, 04:46:33 pm »
Forwarder & Cable Skidder. Parked at the landing waiting to be "hauled off" to the logging contractor's next job. Lee timber harvest; 9/04.


~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #807 on: December 19, 2004, 05:05:36 pm »
Ron's playing hide and go seek the skidders tonight. ;)

Nice bunch of wood there. Now here's a man that puts the pictures before his words. :)

Well as they say a picture is worth a thousand of'm. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #808 on: December 27, 2004, 09:27:03 am »
"All Show"  Is Ready To Move The Forwarder and Cable Skidder Off To Another Timber Harvest Job. Lee timber harvest 10/04.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #809 on: January 02, 2005, 01:57:05 pm »
Tree Length Skidding. This older Timberjack cable skidder is being used to pull tree lengths off a hill side timber harvest. The sawlog, pulpwood, and firewood products are then cut to length for trucking from the top and bottom of the hillside. Jakielek timber harvest 11/04.





~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #810 on: January 07, 2005, 04:58:04 pm »
Harvesting From a Lowland Area. The Timberjack cable skidder sets up at the edge of the lowland area which is too soft for the forwarder to work in. The fallen tree lengths will be cabled out to drier ground for bucking. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #811 on: January 09, 2005, 01:20:10 pm »
Harvesting From a Lowland Area. The Timberjack cable skidder pulls tree lengths from the included lowland hardwood area. The large hardwood tree tops have been removed and trees limbed by the  cutters before skidding so as to prevent any damage or skinning to the remaining trees. The trees will then be bucked into variable lengths by chainsaw on higher ground. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.




~Ron

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #812 on: January 09, 2005, 05:48:49 pm »
 Anyone out there still using a dozer for their skidding? Our land is fairly wet and I'm thinking of getting a track machine for hauling in the wetter areas. A small dozer seems like a good choice as I could could use it for skidding and making small roads. Any thoughts?

Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #813 on: January 11, 2005, 05:20:56 am »
Scott, I don't know of anyone using a dozer for logging.  A neighbour has one for roads and uses the winch to rescue other stuck equipment from the woods.

The thought of putting new undercarriage or tracks on a bulldozer scares the $$$ out of me :D  Nothing on them seems to be cheap!

You mention your land is pretty wet, do you mean swamp?  I'm just thinking little dozers don't do real well in swamp, and are harder to get out.

One of those J-5's with a tracked forwarder trailer and winch are pretty neat.  Up in north nb they drive em on the peat bogs.

Offline OneWithWood

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #814 on: January 11, 2005, 06:55:47 am »
Scott,
I use an old John Deere 450CA crawler/loader to skid with on my property.  I have a pair of log forks that replace the bucket when I need them and a nice big timber winch on the back.  There are times I wish it was a dozer with a 6way blade and the wider tracks but more times I am glad to have the versatility of the bucket or forks.  When the ground is wet I pay the cable in and out to move the logs.  Before I figured this out I buried the critter up to its belly pan when I hit a soft spot skidding up a slope.  Pulled myself out with the winch.
Parts aren't cheap but then parts aren't cheap for a skidder either.  the major drawback is the time it takes to skid a long distance.  The trade off is that the impact to the woods is far less than the big wheeled skidders.
One With Wood
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Offline slowzuki

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #815 on: January 11, 2005, 12:33:46 pm »
OWW when you say the impact is lower than a skidder, do you mena cause you're going slower and don't smash into things or are you strickly talking footprint on the ground?

Offline OneWithWood

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #816 on: January 11, 2005, 07:11:00 pm »
Both.  A crawler or dozer spreads the weight accross a much wider area than a skidder so compaction of the soil is lessened.  Newer tire designs I believe have improved the soil compaction of skidders but I think they still compact more than a tracked vehicle.  Wheeled skidders came into being for speed.  That same speed can cause some serious rutting on damp soils.  I am not an authority on the subject of wheeled versus tracked vehicles but this is my understanding of the impact difference.
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Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #817 on: January 12, 2005, 02:07:59 pm »
 My family's land has some swamp on it but is most just wet and soft. Right now we have a MF 1040 tractor, its about 33 horse power. The tractor is to light for heavy pulling and its very narrow, making it tippy even on fairly tame ground. Also those skinny little 4x4 front tires slice pretty bad. Most likely we'll end up getting a larger tractor (50 to 60 HP) with wider tires on it. We've also looked at the J5's with winches and trailers. The dozer seemed like a well rounded tool for the woodlot. Travel speed isn't a big deal for us. Undercarriages are expensive but we wouldn't be running it alot so it would probably last a long time (an average dozer UC lasts 2 years around here if run daily) .  Maybe I could do some work on the side to help pay for it? Dad wants a machine that can work in tight spots and not rip things up in the woods. Right now we're still just weighing out our options.

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #818 on: January 13, 2005, 05:17:43 am »
I think I know the MF you mean, its a compact model made by Iseki or something like that?  They do have tiny tires up front!

If you do go tractor, they make tires now called R1W's that have a wide footprint and run at low pressures.  Kubota have em on the M6800-9000's as options at most of the good dealers in NB.  New Holland have em too, I think some of the bigger dealers of other brands carry them too.

Compared to a standard tire they more than double the footprint.

I've seen some of those powered forestry trailers lately that use ground speed pto (only some tractors have this), seems this would make a nice combo in the woods.

My concern on the crawler is many older ones have narrow tracks and seem to get stuck in wet spots, but this may be only if they are trying to push dirt.
Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #819 on: January 13, 2005, 08:16:24 am »
Back before my time, father sold stumpage to loggers that used crawlers. They didn't use skidders in those days. Our woodlands were all nice and flat, no side hills. And the ground had gravelly knowls and wet narrow slews where springs come out of the gravel mounds. They used to yard wood quite a long way to the fields and didn't rut the ground up. In later years they used skidders with decent tires on the woodland we owned and didn't rut the ground like what you'd think, we just worked around the wet runs. When I got old enough to cut with dad we left the woods with hardly any evidence we were there. The trails always seemed to seed in with spruce, cedar, white ash or fir. In my plantations there is more ground disruption with C&H plough than any skidder we used cutting wood.

cheers

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry