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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881097 times)

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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #680 on: May 13, 2004, 07:35:30 pm »
Western Star Wood Hauler. Prepares to leave the landing with a load of aspen sawlogs. Doyle Logging; 4/04.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #681 on: May 14, 2004, 05:29:35 pm »
Western Star Log Train. A load of aspen sawlogs slowly gets underway from the landing. Doyle Logging job next to one I'm currently preparing for sale; 5/04.


~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #682 on: May 14, 2004, 07:14:21 pm »
MAC Trucks. Husby Forest Products, truck no 8 with a load of hemlock and cedar from the Nadin watershed (Graham Island) on the Queen Charlotte Islands. On the way to the dry land sort for scaling , then to be loaded and barged to Vancouver Island.



Canadian Air Sky Crane used in heli-logging operations in sensitive areas on the Queeen Charlottes. The engineers do maintenance on the huge engine. 20,000 lb lift capacity.


Vancouver Island Helicopters taxi the crew to a landing on top of Sommerville Island in NW BC, just east of Porcher Canal and near the mouth of the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary on the main land. 45 minutes return flight from Prince Rupert,BC.


The crew get ready to descend down slope to the work site to mark out stands for heli-logging on Sommerville Island in BC. Near Porcher Canal.


Wait don't leave me here on this deserted island with these guys :D :D ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Jeff

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #683 on: May 14, 2004, 07:54:17 pm »
Ron, did you ask where those aspen logs were going? We have been buying 10's from Doyle lately. Seeing is is is a whole load of ten's I bet they are coming here. Looks like what they been hauling. Some of them a little on the small side. :(

Nice pics there Donk
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #684 on: May 15, 2004, 02:12:23 pm »
Jeff,
No I don't know just where Doyle was taking the aspen sawlogs to other than were he was getting "top dollar" for them. If Ray is paying "top dollar" that may be where they are going. They're coming from the Lazy Lake Gun Club property in Fork Township, Mecosta county. Doyle is using the access across the Mike Austin property which we are currently prepairing for sale. 400 acres of oak, aspen etc to work over there.

Do you know when Jake plans to get started on the Dean Sale here north of Cadillac? The landowner is getting anxious.

I'm also working on a small sawlog sale down near Temple north of the Trevino Sale that Billsby done for me a few years ago so Jake might be interested in this one when I get it out on the bid market. This constant wet weather and UP trips has put things behind some.
~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #685 on: May 15, 2004, 02:44:29 pm »
Close-up view of the sky crane engine and the maintenance engineers.



Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Jeff

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #686 on: May 15, 2004, 02:55:05 pm »
Its us then. Hes paying more then anybody.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #687 on: May 15, 2004, 06:11:10 pm »
Timberjack 230A Forwarder; Proctor Logging The forwarder transports hardwood sawlogs to the landing. Corey timber harvest; 5/04.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #688 on: May 16, 2004, 05:09:29 pm »
More Wood Hauler Names Noted:

* Dyer's Tonka Toy
* Polish Express
* Brute
* Big Woody
* Alecia Taylor
~Ron

Offline Tillaway

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #689 on: May 17, 2004, 08:27:01 am »
The Truck naming must be regional.  I have seen only one area in Eastern Oregon where this was done.  Everybody else just uses numbers, sometimes the drivers name is on the door just under the window.  I passed "Grumpy" the other day, the name looked fitting. ;D
Making Tillamook Bay safe for bait; one salmon at a time.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #690 on: May 17, 2004, 06:30:19 pm »
Truck naming seems to be most popular with the wood haulers here. The company or truck owner's name is often panted on a plate on top of the cab and on the cab doors.

The truck's name (not all are named) is usually painted on the nose over the grill. Where there's a stainless grill as many of the newer ones are, the name may be on the side panels behind the cab doors.

The trucks are usually named by the owner or the owner allows his hired driver to name it. It's just a fun thing with me to note the different truck names and then note where I may see that truck again. Some put a lot of miles between places.
~Ron

Offline Swede

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #691 on: May 18, 2004, 01:49:17 am »
That Timberjack 230A Forwarder on the picture from Jeff.........For me it looks too short. Has anyone cut one axle and 9' off or is it how they make them for US market? ::)

Most logs here is 10 to 20', Just small thinning out logs and pulp wood is 8' 4"

Swede.
Had a mobile band sawmill, All hydraulics  for logs 30\"x19´, remote control. (sold it 2009-04-13)
Monkey Blades.Sold them too)
Jonsered 535/15\". Just cut firewood now.

Offline Swede

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #692 on: May 18, 2004, 01:53:20 am »
Sorry! :o that picture was sent from Ron!  ::)

Blind Swede.
Had a mobile band sawmill, All hydraulics  for logs 30\"x19´, remote control. (sold it 2009-04-13)
Monkey Blades.Sold them too)
Jonsered 535/15\". Just cut firewood now.

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #693 on: May 18, 2004, 01:10:51 pm »
Swede,
That is what we call a single bunk forwarder. It is just like my Valmet 644 and is used for shortwood (100 inch long) wood, although I have hauled some 10',12', and even 16 footers. It is very useful in close quarters because the axles are the same distance from the center pivot and so the rear wheels follow exactly in the tracks of the front wheels.
I don't think any manufacturer is selling the single bunks anymore as everyone wants to get bigger and go to a 6 or even 8 wheel double bunk with 4 uprights. Even though I can out manuever a double bunk any day, I wish I had a double bunk so I could sort more while loading and I sometimes need the bogey wheels and tracks under the load for flotation.
The other problem with single bunks is most manufacturers are now mounting the loader on the rear section and a single bunk does not have enough weight to keep from tipping over when you reach out to the side with the loader. They must compensate with shorter loaders and automatic pivot locks but that has not been enough.

Gary
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #694 on: May 18, 2004, 05:16:03 pm »
The single bunks are very popular here for "short wood" operations, though they will carry variable lengths up to 17 feet as max. Many private land owners just don't want the "big stuff" in their woods.
~Ron

Offline Swede

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #695 on: May 19, 2004, 06:15:37 am »
I think many people here use to big forest machies and tractors. One with 80 acre, stands in every ages, have an old vreck, Volvo 868. If he had a 4-WD tractor with half the power + loging trailer with 4-WD it could make the same job as that old vreck. + a lot more than just hauling logs less than 50 hours a year.
I also know one with more than 100 acres using a Fordson Dexta or a Volvo 400. That´s a little crazy too but he use them much more  for harvesting hay.

Many  people here just looks for tractors with 80-130HP, doesn´t matter how small areas they have, forest or agriculture. ::)

I DO understand the need for them short forwarders!  :) Think I could see them here if we had some hardwood and cut short logs. But the loader at rear end at a forwarder ..... :o and  why? ???

About sorting during loading, I´ve seen some trailers with 2  uprights in the middle for easyer sorting. Sometimes they load much more on one side than the other........Then it doesn´t work!  ;D

Swede.

Had a mobile band sawmill, All hydraulics  for logs 30\"x19´, remote control. (sold it 2009-04-13)
Monkey Blades.Sold them too)
Jonsered 535/15\". Just cut firewood now.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #696 on: May 19, 2004, 06:08:55 pm »
Bucking Sugar Maple Sawlogs. The Husky 385 XP is the saw of choice by this feller. Corey timber harvest; 5/04.


~Ron

Offline Tom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #697 on: May 19, 2004, 06:24:49 pm »
That's where the infamous "bow-saw" would make for an easier day.  .......if it were used properly...... :P :)
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Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #698 on: May 19, 2004, 10:20:16 pm »
Swede,
The first forwarders had the loader mounted on the rear of the front section just in front of the pivot. Some even had the loader mounted on the cab roof. When it came time to drive ahead, you had to find a level place on the load to set the grapple and put the swing, graple rotate, and up-down controls in the float position so the loader would follow the rear section as you turned or drove over humps. If you did not find a good level spot, the graple would fall off the side of the load, usually taking all 4 hoses off quicker than you could say "Aw Shucks."   :'(

Been there.  Sometimes you get lucky and only lose 1 hose. Incidentally in MN if you spill over 5 gallons of hydraulic fluid, you are required to call the Duty Officer and report the spill.

The newer models now have the loader mounted on the front of the rear section, just behind the pivot. You can just leave the loader over the middle of the load, no float needed,  This way you do not need 4 spare hoses, wrenches, and extra hydraulic fluid.  8)

The problem with the loader on the rear section is most of the weight when empty is in the front section. However they have added a hydraulic swivel lock between the front and rear that is automatically locked except when you are driving. Some adventurous operators will swing the grapple and manually unlock the swivel to grab that log that is just out of reach.

Gary

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Offline Swede

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #699 on: May 20, 2004, 08:53:06 am »
Eric;
"The newer models now have the loader mounted on the front of the rear section, just behind the pivot"

That´s where we have placed the loaders the last 40 years and I think it´s what You ment earlier.
On tractors with forest equipments from the -50 and -60´s some loaders here too was placed on the roof. Have never seen a forwarder built that way.

Swedish log trucks have their loaders on the rear end of the bed so they can load even the trailer. They also have a cab on the loader!
I have never seen a semi truck with logs here. Driving off the asphalt they should be in the mud for ever.  :D

http://www.vemservice.se/0245160.htm

-50 and -60´s:  http://hem.passagen.se/vaxjobilfrakt/gast/gastbilder1.htm
Had a mobile band sawmill, All hydraulics  for logs 30\"x19´, remote control. (sold it 2009-04-13)
Monkey Blades.Sold them too)
Jonsered 535/15\". Just cut firewood now.