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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880829 times)

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Offline Bud Man

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #40 on: April 05, 2002, 09:32:56 pm »
I spect you'd be wearing stripes and looking out small windows !!     :D
The groves were God's first temples.. " A Forest Hymn"  by.. William Cullen Bryant

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #41 on: April 06, 2002, 11:40:41 am »
I don't know just exactly what this cable skidder was all made from. Just bits and pieces from his home junk yard.

He was a firewood producer who came in to cut firewood and clean up the topwood after a sawlog job. The skidder was just able to handle the lighter topwood. It was a little under powered for bigger stuff. It was a conversation piece when compared to the fancy Timber Jacks etc.

This person was the type who just made everything from junk parts, his wood splitter, haul truck etc were all home built as needed. He had to pour oil into the wood splitter engine while he split wood; quite an operation, but not environmentally sound.

He bought an old big Ford Crown Victoria from the landowner who had it parked in his "bone yard" back in the woods for a number of years. He paid $25.00 for it. I didn't think that it would ever run and asked him what he was going to do with it.

The next day he was driving it around the woods to his firewood operation. He was more of an inventor than a firewood producer as things seemed to run without all the parts.





~Ron

Offline psychotic1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2002, 05:12:10 pm »
Don't even think those sorts of things :o
Now I'm gonna have to look over my shoulder for weeks to be sure the envir-cops and the forest service aren't following me.  The get downright snippy if they catch you rolling a beach log back into the water.  And that's one that's already been in the water for awhile.  I've seen people get fined for walking too close to a "salmon stream" that hadn't had any fish in it for twenty years.
It was fun while it lasted.  But now Alaska is closed except for tourism.  And I here the "tree-huggers" will be starting on that next.  The smoke from the cruise ships is causing air pollution don't you know.

Bruce
Patience, hell.  I'm gonna kill something

Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #43 on: April 06, 2002, 09:17:48 pm »
Here are a couple of pictures taken spring 1993,near Pemberton B.C. They are of my dads two brothers,Harold,and Thor. Harold (with his back turned) started falling with axe and misery whip in 1950,with his dad.He said if it wasn't for power saws coming shortly after,he would be doing something else.He quit falling fulltime at 64.




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Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #44 on: April 06, 2002, 09:27:33 pm »
This is Thor.He was 58 in 1993.He was a skilled and highball faller.In July that year a pine snag came down as he was falling a D-Fir and broke his lower back.We packed him out on a spine board,and he was air lifted out on a chopper.He never fell again,but is healthy and fishing now  8)






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Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #45 on: April 06, 2002, 09:32:04 pm »
Fir stand in Pemberton




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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2002, 08:39:17 am »
Now we're getting into some of the "bigger" timber from other forest areas.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2002, 02:08:32 pm »
Iron Mule 501 C Forwarder. An old standby for short wood logging. Unit is carrying out aspen and red maple pulpwood to landing.


~Ron

Offline Steve

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #48 on: April 07, 2002, 03:20:04 pm »
Seeing the picture of the forwarder reminded me of this couple of pages of pictures I had. Ohia logging and milling the south end of the Big Island.

http://www.curlykoa.com/webpics2/Ohia.html


Steve
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www.curlykoa.com

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #49 on: April 07, 2002, 07:21:52 pm »
Iron Mule Forwarder. Carrying sugar (hard) maple sawlogs to the landing.


~Ron

Offline Tom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #50 on: April 07, 2002, 08:26:57 pm »
Shortwood Pulp truck used for years to support families on tops, tailings and Urban wood until the big companies saw fit to favor long wood loads.  This is an indangered industry in the south.
extinct

Offline Corley5

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #51 on: April 07, 2002, 09:10:44 pm »
Alot of people around here used to cut bolt wood/pallet wood.  There were two mills that sawed only short stuff.  There both closed now.  There were lots of rough looking old trucks on the roads.  That was also when the weighmasters were friendlier :)
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2002, 09:10:51 pm »
Tom,That was interesting.What species was on the truck? What would be the value of that load? I hate to see the end of an era,where a guy can make a buck with what is on hand,and a little perseverance.Anymore on the subject would be welcome.

Paul
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Offline Tom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2002, 09:46:22 pm »
Paul,
That load is pine.  Eddy said he was getting $25 per ton and his load will be about five tons.  Most of the pine grown in plantations here is longleaf, Slash and Loblolly.  Pond Pine (pocosin or black pine) is common and used for pulp but not grown commercially.  These trucks generally carried wood that was left by the big loggers and filled a niche by picking up Urban woods (Oak, Pine or various trees that Arborist need to have disposed).

This gentlemn is a 74+ year old preacher who carries 4 to 6 loads a week to stay out of trouble.  The wood is usually free for the asking and is sold for $75 to $250, dependent upon species and market,.  per load.  It is purchased by the ton.  It takes him about 2 1/2 or 3 hours to create a load by himself.  

I get wood from the county.  Some I saw, some is not good for anything I want to do.  I give the wood to Eddy, the pulpwooder,  just to get it out of the yard.  He knows that when wood is scarce, he can pick up a load or fill out a load at my place.  He also follows a couple of Arborist around and removes their wood.

The biggest detriment to this work is the independence of the big pulpwood companies. they will buy shortwood only one or two days a week and will go sometimes for weeks refusing to buy any at all.  The shortwood haulers used to be welcomed and let into the log yard ahead of the big trucks so they could unload and return for more.  Now I understand they have to wait in line with all the rest of the haulers and it limits them to one or perhaps two loads a day at best.  

Fewer and fewer of these operators can be found today.  Most are selling to an intermediate log yard for a small portion of what they could get at the mill.  The intermediate yard owner holds the wood until the market opens and carries the wood to the mill on big trucks.

Many of the pulp mills are recycling paper.  They get their pulp from boxes etc and  seldom buy logs at all.  

The sawmills are/were owned by the pulp industry.  Lumber was considered a byproduct of making paper rather than the other way around.  Now the sawmills are being recognized for providing the pulp companies with a good portion of their bottom line.  Chip 'n Saws are making lumber and providing clean chips to the pulp mills. Short wood has little market here any more.
extinct

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #54 on: April 08, 2002, 03:06:52 pm »
Iron Mule Forwarder. Loading out shortwood. These small forwarders are becoming a thing of the past and hard to find. I still like to see their use as they are good for "light on the land" timber harvesting which most small private landowners want.

One small producer still has two of them. He runs one and his wife the other. They do some of the best work in quality hardwood jobs.


~Ron

Offline Cedar Eater

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #55 on: April 08, 2002, 03:39:11 pm »
Keep these pictures coming Ron and everyone. It's not only interesting, but educational for me to see these machines in action. It looks like I might be having a sawtimber harvest followed by a pulp harvest later this year, so I'm extra curious.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #56 on: April 08, 2002, 07:40:57 pm »
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Working short wood in a hardwood selection harvest.


~Ron

Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #57 on: April 08, 2002, 10:40:15 pm »
Ron, A question.What would have been used 40-50 years ago, to log in these same areas? I am not familiar with this type of logging,and it's quite interesting.Would small Cats(D3-D-4) have been used?
What was used to load? Gin pole maybe?
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Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #58 on: April 08, 2002, 11:20:58 pm »
This old Mac was still hauling in Oregon,1995.It was hauling out of a skyline thinning show  


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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #59 on: April 09, 2002, 12:31:26 pm »
Yes the small to medium sized crawlers were the primary use machines during that period. They were in the process of replacing horses back then They were versatile over much of the varied terrain and an all purpose machine for road buiding, snow plowing, skidding, forwarding, etc. They were slow in production however, especially for high volumes of production needed to feed the pulpwood mills coming on line. They were also harder on the landscape (people were more respectful of the loggers work methods back then).

Some crawlers were equiped with loading booms, or front loaders. "Gin poles", spars, and "A" frames were also set up at primarly landings to load trucks as were some labor intensive hand methods of "hand roll and lift platforms".

The boon to loading was the development of the Prentice loader in the 1960's. This hydraulic loader was developed by Leo Heikkinen in Wisconsin, and helped revolutionize log loading.

Rubber tired and flexible frame skidding units were being developed, but it took  and adjustment to change period and awhile to perfect a rubber tire that would hold up to the woods abuse, not puncture, etc.

The Gafner Iron Mule as those previously pictured was first built in 1957. They went through several improved models and was one of the most successful pulpwood forwarders ever made. They're still a favorite of mine.

Those western trucks log trucks are monsters. Appreciate your photo. I'll get into a truck series from this part of the country later. I need to get some more photos as I've given many of my best ones away to the owners, drivers, landowners, fellers, operators,etc.



~Ron