The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881012 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline lopet

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1003
  • Age: 57
  • Location: SW Ontario Canada
  • Gender: Male
  • Do not climb any higher your comportable falling !
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3060 on: July 21, 2015, 10:46:29 pm »
They never brake in the shop. :o
Make sure you know how to fall properly when you fall and as to not hurt anyone around you.
Also remember, it's not the fall what hurts, its the sudden stop. !!

Offline snowstorm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3475
  • Location: maine
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3061 on: July 22, 2015, 06:41:16 am »
they look like gear driven naf rears. my valmet has chain drive naf that says valmet on it. my rottne has gear drive naf that says rottne on it. what dose wonky sound like???crash bang ? or scrunich?

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3062 on: July 22, 2015, 12:38:17 pm »
Not a good working situation. Hope it turns out better than it looks.
~Ron

Offline Ken

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1055
  • Age: 51
  • Location: New Brunswick
  • Gender: Male
  • Forester
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3063 on: July 23, 2015, 07:12:50 pm »
X2, what's up with it that you had to tear the whole diff out?
[/quote]

I seem to have gotten off very lucky.  When travelling back in the trail Tuesday am I noticed one side of the bogies jumping a bit.  I stopped, got the other operator and had him try it while I was on the back of machine.  When he tried it the bogies on the opposite side would not spin.   We then unhooked the driveshaft and assisted the machine to roadside with the harvester and tore it down. 
When we stripped it apart yesterday morning the all components looked great  8).  There was however a huge build up of pressure in the differential.  We believe that one of the brake cylinders was leaking by and the vent plug was not releasing all the pressure thereby causing the brakes to lock on.  It may have been overkill to tear it apart but now I know what the inside looks like and can have confidence that it should last a long time.  Far too often I have seen machinery run too long when something was not right and consequently ended up with larger issues.  Hopefully start putting it back in machine tomorrow.   
Lots of toys for working in the bush

Offline barbender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5104
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Deer River MN
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3064 on: July 23, 2015, 09:53:51 pm »
Those brake cans are notorious for leaking hydraulic fluid into the differential and overfilling it. We draw straws to see who has to pop the plug to check the oil level, because a lot of times there is pressure built up and you get a shower of gear lube/hydraulic oil >:( You seem like a head first kinda guy, Ken!
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3065 on: July 26, 2015, 08:01:44 pm »
Thinning in some hills of northern hardwoods. Riehl timber harvest, June, 2015.
 

  

  

 
~Ron

Offline 1270d

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1102
  • Age: 32
  • Location: U.P. Michigan
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3066 on: July 26, 2015, 10:24:35 pm »
Looks like that area was just cut a couple years ago?   Or just skidding through a previous cut?

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3067 on: July 27, 2015, 01:52:06 pm »
Good observation! The lower valley area that we are primarily skidding through was high graded
10-12 years ago. We are now harvesting much of the hillside timber that was previously left.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3068 on: July 27, 2015, 05:51:31 pm »
Hardwood sawlogs are being decked along a seasonal access road, The seasonal road is elevated above the lower landing/decking area where the trucker will park along the road side and load the logs. All wood should be hauled this week and the timber harvest contract will be closed. Riehl timber harvest, 7/2015.


  

 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3069 on: August 23, 2015, 05:11:48 pm »
Starting another hardwood job. The John Deere 1270E Processor is unloaded from the lowboy and walked back in on the timber access road to begin its work on the timber harvest. Harris/Ketchum timber harvest, 8/15.


  

  

 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3070 on: August 26, 2015, 07:36:46 pm »
The Valmet 646 Forwarder picks up the hardwood sawlogs, pulpwood, and firewood products behind the processor, August 2015.
 

  

 
~Ron

Offline Ken

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1055
  • Age: 51
  • Location: New Brunswick
  • Gender: Male
  • Forester
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3071 on: August 26, 2015, 07:55:29 pm »
Thanks for the pictures Ron.  That hardwood looks quite rugged for that wheeled harvester and dangle head.  Certainly not what they are designed for but with an experienced operator can be quite efficient. 
Lots of toys for working in the bush

Offline lumbertick

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 113
  • Location: West Branch, MI
  • Gender: Male
  • Timber savage!
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3072 on: August 26, 2015, 09:35:49 pm »
Who's 1170E is that

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3073 on: August 27, 2015, 05:17:36 pm »
The 1270E processor is owned by Housler Sawmill, Inc., Mesick, Mi. and is doing an excellent job on this northern hardwoods harvest. Yes, it helps that the operator has been to school in Finland on its use and has over 20,000 hours in working such machines.
 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment, 8/2015
« Reply #3074 on: August 28, 2015, 05:22:47 pm »
Cut to Length harvest with the John Deere 1270E Processor, 8/2015


  

 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3075 on: September 01, 2015, 11:39:17 am »
View of the inside of the cab of the John Deere 1270E Processor showing computer screen, map and specs. file of timber sale, etc. ,8/15
 

 
Cutting Head. With the skilled operator, the machine was able to cut up to 20" hardwoods quite well. A hand cutter and forwarder followed up for cutting the larger diameter hardwoods.
 

 
~Ron

Offline Ken

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1055
  • Age: 51
  • Location: New Brunswick
  • Gender: Male
  • Forester
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3076 on: September 01, 2015, 05:36:39 pm »
Did you get to take it for a drive Ron?
Lots of toys for working in the bush

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3077 on: September 01, 2015, 08:07:44 pm »
Very short one with tutoring. ;)
~Ron

Offline 1270d

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1102
  • Age: 32
  • Location: U.P. Michigan
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3078 on: September 01, 2015, 09:25:47 pm »
The 270 is supposed to be a great hardwood head.

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #3079 on: September 02, 2015, 03:07:23 pm »
Yes, I was very surprised as to how it handled the large hardwoods with ease. Very few trees were left for the followup hand-cutter. Much less than i thought there might be.
~Ron