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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880860 times)

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Offline coxy

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2740 on: December 28, 2014, 07:57:26 pm »
I have started the winter off with 2 the first one got mushed  :D :D

Offline Maine logger88

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2741 on: December 28, 2014, 08:12:44 pm »
O really that always sucks. What did you get 66s?
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Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2742 on: January 05, 2015, 08:24:14 am »
 

 
Ed K

Offline coxy

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2743 on: January 05, 2015, 03:53:39 pm »
ed is that yours that's neat  ;D

Offline Puffergas

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2744 on: January 05, 2015, 07:31:09 pm »
ed is that yours that's neat  ;D

And nice woods..!!    ;D
Jeff
Somewhere 20 miles south of Lake Erie.

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Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2745 on: January 05, 2015, 07:49:34 pm »
It belongs to my boss at the highway garage.He just installed the Tajfun winch this fall.Before it had the winch that came on the front of the duce and half.I'll get a pic of the way he set up the winch when it warms a little.
Ed K

Offline brendonv

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2746 on: January 06, 2015, 08:27:46 pm »
Just messing with uploading vids from phone.

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Offline brendonv

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2747 on: January 06, 2015, 08:34:00 pm »
Thats a fail. Uploaded private some how dont know how to change it on ipad.

Edit. Figured it out
"Trees live a secret life only revealed to those that climb them"

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Offline longtime lurker

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2748 on: January 07, 2015, 05:22:00 am »
Grabbed a few pics (mobile phone so please forgive the quality) on the last load out for 2014.

First we get to leave home:

 

thats the front "lawn" at home so it can be difficult at times, depending on how the fish are biting.

Then we drive up the mountain:

 

 

The road is barely wide enough for two cars to pass each other. Make one a truck and it can be a case of slow down and creep past each other or at times someone gets to back up to a wide spot. Going up isn't such a problem but coming down can be a bit "intesting" at times, and downright terrifying at others. Running the jinker with full length logs we put a pilot vehicle out front for the 15 odd miles of the range road proper. Today we's only on clean up duty - shorts and the last few full logs that it wasn't worth sending a tractor trailer rig up for.

The quickest way to make a million dollars with a sawmill is to start with two million.

Offline longtime lurker

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2749 on: January 07, 2015, 05:31:51 am »
The current block is a mix of "eucalypts". There's rose gum, red mahogany, Turpentine, and Bloodwood in this block. The harvest zone has around 4000 acres of workable ground and we'll take off somewhere around 3000 tonnes of sawlog over the next few years. The plan is to utilise this block for our annual "wet season" logs - we get rain like Alaska gets snow, and what logs we have in the mill yard at the end of December usually have to carry us through to early May.

 

 
 
This block was last cut about 40 or so years back so what we're getting is a mix of regrowth and larger logs that were deliberately left last time. In turn we leave a % of the larger timber for the next crew - the aim of this is to harvest on a 40 year cycle and have a mix of log sizes. What doesnt really show in this picture is the length of them - a lot of those logs will give 2 "tree length" logs at 45 foot each. 90' to the first branch isn't uncommon in a rose gum block. We don't take anyhting under 18" dbh as a general rule, and a fair percentage of these will be hitting 36" dbh.
The quickest way to make a million dollars with a sawmill is to start with two million.

Offline longtime lurker

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2750 on: January 07, 2015, 05:42:29 am »
Logs are cut exclusively with a chainsaw, and the length issue means it takes a fair degree of skill to get them on the ground cleanly, and sometimes a lot of winching and blocks when things dont go according to plan. Then they get pulled to the ramp by skidder or sometimes the dozer, then loaded with a wheel loader. The heavy gear has gone home for the wet when these pictures were taken so all thats left to load is the JCB. It is nominally a 2.5t machine but the counterweight has been expanded and she'll handle closer to 4t.



 

Logs are broken for loading on the little truck as required, which is determined by either the max length I think I can get away with or the lift capacity of the gear. I run overlength and overweight a lot in the body truck - no onboard scales and the reality is that Australian hardwoods weigh heavy. About 1.5 times the density of red oak, to give you guys a frame of reference.

Last of the logs on the ramp:

 
The quickest way to make a million dollars with a sawmill is to start with two million.

Offline longtime lurker

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2751 on: January 07, 2015, 05:55:06 am »
Then back down the hill to home with the jakes echoing off those rock walls all the way down. You mightn't be able to see me coming but you'd have to be deaf not to hear it. Up the coast to the mill and unload.

 

 

Reminding ourselves that we better get the waterpump back into the yard loader soon because this "short log" caper is a little bit tough on the 2t forklift. :D

Last load of logs for 2014 "in".

 

 

Probably around the 12t mark on that load. Mind the wet appears to be late and if it doesn't rain in the next week we might just throw a skidder on and go back and get some more. 8)
The quickest way to make a million dollars with a sawmill is to start with two million.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2752 on: January 07, 2015, 06:12:48 am »
Thanks for the pictures and how things are down in your part of the world.
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Offline coxy

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2753 on: January 07, 2015, 06:56:40 am »
nice pics that poor little kitty cat  >:( in the one pic it looks there was a fire or is that how the first 5ft of the tree looks standing they look burnt  :)

Offline longtime lurker

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2754 on: January 07, 2015, 03:09:41 pm »
nice pics that poor little kitty cat  >:( in the one pic it looks there was a fire or is that how the first 5ft of the tree looks standing they look burnt  :)

Fire is part of the cycle in  eucalypt woodlands. Mostly they need to burn every couple of years, the hard shells on the seed pods require the heat to crack open so they can grow. Doesn't hurt the live trees at all - they have thick bark either full length or in a "stocking " at the base to protect the tree - and it helps to clear out competing weeds etc also. The major problem that arises is when they don't burn regularly, excessive fuel loads can make for fires that are uncontrolablely hot.
Working after a burn is nicer... we might have to suck a bit of ash with the dust but we can actually see where we're going in there. Dead logs are very slow to burn, particularly turpentine which is one of the most fire retardant timbers in the world. There's old stumps and trees on the ground that might be 100 years old in there and all they have is some charring.
The quickest way to make a million dollars with a sawmill is to start with two million.

Offline coxy

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2755 on: January 07, 2015, 06:59:37 pm »
 thanks for the info    do you have a pic of a turpentine tree never heard of one  ;D

Offline Puffergas

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2756 on: January 07, 2015, 07:13:10 pm »
The Reo is gone but not forgoten... 8)

Resting


 


Rear view


 

Landing
 

 
 
Skidding
 

 


In the yard
 

 

Out the back window
 

 

Another hitch
 

 

 :new_year:
Jeff
Somewhere 20 miles south of Lake Erie.

GEHL 5624 skid steer, IHC 300 Utility, Timberjack 225D, Burg Bandsaw mill

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2757 on: January 07, 2015, 07:16:54 pm »
Puffergas,thanks alot!!
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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2758 on: January 09, 2015, 10:41:04 am »
Building a pile-
 

     I like to lay out the wood the length of where the pile will be, it makes it easier to build the pile straight.



     Then I take my "bucket" (lake states term for grapple) and tap things straight. Keeping the bucket half open kind of works like a plumb bob and helps me keep the face of the pile vertical.



   

      Then you just keep adding on and going up ;)
   

     When you have that one piled up, start another row, if you have room-
 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2759 on: January 09, 2015, 10:43:55 am »
I thought this scene was pretty, this is a mature stand of second growth Red pine after a fresh snowfall. Unfortunately that's not what we're cutting, it was just where my machine was parked ::)

Too many irons in the fire