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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880877 times)

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StIhL_MaGnUm_1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #260 on: October 29, 2002, 01:39:46 pm »
Hey Ron nice little tree farmer you got there how do you like it?Nice pics by the way I'm suprised no one else post's any pics for us to look at...I have been thinking about looking into purchasin one of the new JD 848G series dual function skidder's for a few weeks now I guess I'll have to swing by NorTrax East this week.... ;)

                         Later Rob....

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #261 on: October 29, 2002, 05:06:51 pm »
A Logger's Pick-Up Carries Their Needs.
Tool Box; Fuel Tank for skidder & forwarder fuel; Storage  Boxes for spare parts, hydraulic hoses etc., Lunch Cooler; Chain Saw Oil; Extra Chain Saw ( Husky 288XP) etc.


~Ron

Offline smwwoody

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #262 on: October 29, 2002, 07:39:17 pm »
That JD 848 is that the TJ 660 painted yellow?
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #263 on: October 30, 2002, 06:17:46 am »
Black Cherry Logs. Ready to be forwarded to the landing after the cutter returns from his lunch break.


~Ron

StIhL_MaGnUm_1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #264 on: October 30, 2002, 12:30:19 pm »
smwwoody,

         I don't really know for sure but I will let you know by the middle of next week..

Ron,

         Nice pics as always ;DI almost thought that you took a pic of my truck till I saw the 288 and not a 385 and 064 ;).

                             Later Rob..

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #265 on: October 30, 2002, 04:59:08 pm »
1990 Timberjack 240A Forwarder. Carrying out a "bunk" of hardwoods. Harris Hardwood Sale 10/02.




~Ron

Offline WV_hillbilly

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #266 on: October 31, 2002, 08:08:33 pm »
 Ron do they leave the middle piece (the one that saw is touching)in the woods or do they take it out to be sawed into lumber? It seems to me that there would be some real nice crotch wood in that piece.

Thanks Hillbilly
Hillbilly

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #267 on: November 01, 2002, 04:50:41 pm »
Hillbilly,

The center crutch piece of the black cherry was left in the woods. It's there for anyone that wants it or it becomes a grouse "drumming log".
 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #268 on: November 01, 2002, 05:00:08 pm »
Timberjack 240A Forwarder Unloads Sawlogs at the Landing. Harris Hardwood Sale 10/02.



~Ron

Offline TJACK

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #269 on: November 01, 2002, 06:32:10 pm »
Ron,

I have noticed in your area they use a lot of forwarders.  Is there an advantage in time or perference in getting the job over cable skidders?  I realize there is less impact on the land.  Why do I ask? I live in North Western PA where most of the timber harvesting (saw logs and veneer, black cherry, red oak and maple) is with cable skidders, very few forwarders.  If you cut pulp or firewood, grapple skidders.  Maybe do to the hills?

TJACK

Offline smwwoody

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #270 on: November 01, 2002, 08:44:54 pm »
T jack
Forwarders don't work real well on our hill sides I have rented that big franklin that grotzinger equiptment has a few times when we had over a 1.5 mile long skid and used the skidders to pre bunch and then hauled to the landing with the forwarder. and one time when we could not get the log trucks through the snow and the state would not let us plow the truck road because it was being used as a snowmobiel trail so we prehauled with the forwarder down off of the ridge road in emporium to the golf course where the log trucks could get to.  Woody
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Offline WV_hillbilly

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #271 on: November 03, 2002, 08:03:18 pm »
Ron

  that puzzles me as I would think that someone could make some high dollar boards out of that. I don't know anything about sawmilling or logging I just use the boards. But I hope to get a mill in the next 2 years. I own a small farm and would like to cut some of my own trees for lumber.

Hillbilly
Hillbilly

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #272 on: November 08, 2002, 06:55:25 pm »
Most of my hardwood sales are selectively marked and require short wood variable length logging with none over 17 feet in length. Tree length skidding is not permitted as the primary method, thus forwarders are primarily used.

The land owner clients I have do not want their forest landscape and remaining trees damaged. More resource damage is often done with excessive use of cable skidders.

The forwarders are also easier on the landowner roads and trails. However, there is usally a limited need for cable skidders being used as you stated on hill sides, reaching into wet areas, assisting cutters in pulling down leaners, etc.

Most timber producers have both a forwarder and a supporting cable skidder on the job for support as needed, but they are not the primary skidding method.

There are timber harvests were tree length skidding is permitted and grapple and cable skidders are used, but not in quality hardwood selective harvests. Remaining trees to improve a landowner's stand quality and values can not be damaged in excess.

I've worked both in West Virginia and Pennsylvania and know the hills well in your landscapes. It is much more difficult than what we have here in Michigan, thus the terrain may dictate more use of cables.

I can recall $70,000 +/mile haul roads in West Virginia 20 years ago.  We just need to be as "light on the land" as possible.
~Ron

Offline smwwoody

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #273 on: November 08, 2002, 07:08:20 pm »
Quote
More resource damage is often done with excessive use of cable skidders.





that should read excessive use of caable skidders with bad or lazy opperators.
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Cleereman head rig
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McDonugh gang saw
McDonugh edger
McDonugh resaw
TS end trim
Pendu slab recovery system
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #274 on: November 08, 2002, 07:15:38 pm »
Truck Driver and Timber Producer. They "talk things over" as they get ready for "a load to the mill".


~Ron

Offline smwwoody

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #275 on: November 08, 2002, 07:22:42 pm »
Ron

how many ton do they put on those things?
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McDonugh edger
McDonugh resaw
TS end trim
Pendu slab recovery system
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #276 on: November 08, 2002, 07:35:22 pm »
I agree. The resource damage is proportinal to the experience and care of the skidder "or forwarder" operator and also the job foreman overseeing the harvest.

If you look back through this thread, you will see cables and grapples in use also. One recent timber harvest had both type machines in full production. The select hardwood area used forwarders and the aspen clear-cut areas used grapples. A cable skidder was used as a support unit on both areas.

Soil types and soil disturbance is also a concern often overlooked as to the type of unit used.

~Ron

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #277 on: November 08, 2002, 07:48:09 pm »
Woody,

20-30 tons of green wood depending upon the species.
~Ron

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #278 on: November 10, 2002, 05:52:06 pm »
Getting A load Of Sawlogs Out. While the timber producer decks a "bunk" of pulpwood with the 230A Timberjack Forwarder.

Both sawlogs and pulpwood are harvested concurrently during the selective timber harvest. (Harris Hardwood Sale, October 2002.)

 
~Ron

Offline Tillaway

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #279 on: November 10, 2002, 07:00:04 pm »
Ron,
It seems as though you have allot of self loader trucks in your region.  Self loaders are rare in California since they usually service small landowners that do their own logging.  Lots of them comparetively in Oregon and Washington though.

Is it common to use self loaders even when a loader is available on the landing.  I ask this since the loggers out west are very concerned about truck payloads since the loader reduces this.

When a forwarder is used out here part of it's task is to load trucks.  So a self loader is redundant for this type operation.
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