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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881198 times)

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Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2520 on: October 14, 2014, 06:21:11 pm »
M Cook

Ya we still have a ton of those old customers..
We have turned down over half of them we don't go any further down then birch run now.
You buy alit of ur own sales or just so a lot for pca?

Offline M Cook

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2521 on: October 14, 2014, 08:23:24 pm »
We buy all our own wood, were also hauling to DPI in Alpena.  A couple times a year we chip plantation aspen for PCA on their land.

Mike Cook
Mike Cook

Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2522 on: October 14, 2014, 08:44:03 pm »
M Cook

I see you guys must get pretty good money per ton out of those clean chips?

Offline M Cook

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2523 on: October 14, 2014, 09:19:50 pm »
Lumbertick

We get more than pulpwood prices and can produce a lot more tons, but it is an expensive investment.
We are closely monitored on bark content and chip size, and need to feed decent wood to chipper so we don't pull any scrag logs. 

Someday when you have time get a hold of me and I'll take you out to job and show you what we're doing, right now we're around 10 miles from Tobie's mill. Tobie has my number.

Mike Cook
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Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2524 on: October 15, 2014, 08:17:06 am »
M Cook

Sounds good.. I would like to see one of those work

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2525 on: October 15, 2014, 08:47:30 am »
 
Daylight on the landing, on a large UPM aspen sale (company land). Unfortunately, the harvester operator will find a flat tire waiting for him this morning.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline BargeMonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2526 on: October 15, 2014, 09:09:56 am »
  Now thats a nice neat pile of wood.  ;)

Offline lopet

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2527 on: October 15, 2014, 08:07:00 pm »
Yup  it's gotta be somebody's pile who knows how to run a forwarder. 8)
Make sure you know how to fall properly when you fall and as to not hurt anyone around you.
Also remember, it's not the fall what hurts, its the sudden stop. !!

Offline Maine logger88

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2528 on: October 15, 2014, 08:09:47 pm »
The truckers must love coming to your job 8)
79 TJ 225 81 JD 540B Husky and Jonsered saws

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2529 on: October 15, 2014, 09:05:38 pm »
I try to keep it as neat as I can and still keep hustling. I used to haul wood and I know first hand how it stinks when the landing isn't right and the piles are messy. Plus, the truckers get paid by the load and I get paid by the hour. I figure if I make a mess just to up production a bit,  I'm lowering their hourly wage to do it. Maybe it's that Golden Rule thing ;)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2530 on: October 15, 2014, 09:19:27 pm »
Barbender

How much production do you average per hour with that Ponsse is decent wood

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2531 on: October 16, 2014, 10:34:00 am »
Well, it depends on the skid length a lot for forwarder production. If I get this machine heaped good, it's 7 cords a load. Right now the skid is almost 1/2 mile, I top the load off with big wood and pile it as high as I can, it has to be close to 8 cords then. At that, I get one load an hour. Last night a I was tired of the long skid, so I moved wood that was right on the landing and piled as much in 3 hours as I had in 10 on the long skid. Overall, I try to have an average of a load per hour I work, that includes time spent on maintenance, greasing, etc- if I have 50 hours on my paycheck I want 50 loads on the landing. The processor is probably getting 10-12 cords an hour in this wood- good production.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2532 on: October 16, 2014, 12:14:18 pm »
Does he cut them down or you guys got a buncher in front of processor?

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2533 on: October 16, 2014, 02:21:47 pm »
No buncher, we never use that method. The numbers for the processor are in good quality aspen, 10"-12" dbh, 6-7 sticks and flat ground.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2534 on: October 16, 2014, 05:52:37 pm »
I try to keep it as neat as I can and still keep hustling.

Everybody on this site can appreciate the nice pile of wood but only those who have piled wood with a loader can appreciate the expertise of the operator who piled it.  Great job.

No buncher, we never use that method. The numbers for the processor are in good quality aspen, 10"-12" dbh, 6-7 stocks and flat ground.

Wow  10-12 cords/hour.  I need to get better
Lots of toys for working in the bush

Offline lumbertick

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2535 on: October 16, 2014, 06:14:22 pm »
I run a fabtek 133 and I average 8 cords in hour in good aspen and 10 cord an hour in red pine... Hardwood averages 6-7 per hour and I cut it down with processor... We tryed running a shear in front of it but didn't really help.. Only time it is good to run a shear in front of a processor is if you are going to chip

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2536 on: October 16, 2014, 08:02:38 pm »
Thanks for the compliments, Ken. Now on the production numbers, there's a few poor areas on this sale where I doubt they cut 5 cords an hour, probably closer to 3. Small wood, and lots of brush. That stuff kills my production too, I only got 8 loads out today in 9 hours. A long skid with small brushy wood >:( The outfit I work for has some darn good processor operators no doubt, I have worked behind one (in a Ponsse Bear) that was keeping 2 of us in forwarders busy, in medium to large aspen. Around 140 cords a day. That's not every day, but we got in a groove where he was cutting 80-90 cords per day with just me following him, and he wasn't pushing hard. I know that because he was parked with his feet kicked up a lot ::) I wasn't going to call him on it cause I knew I would just be working longer days to keep up :) This operator was also on a Red pine final felling where he had 2 forwarders AND a skidder pulling poles out :o Understand, that's not everyday either, that's the job everyone talks about for 5 years afterward ;) As a forwarder operator, I know when I'm getting moved to different sales what to expect by wood types- decent aspen clear cuts will be getting put on the ground at anywhere from 70-100 cords a day, first entry red pine thinnings 30-60, winter black spruce 30-40.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline BargeMonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2537 on: October 16, 2014, 11:56:51 pm »
 100 cord in 1 day stacked on the header would be like the high point in my logging career. :D 1/2 a load of saw logs, 16-24 cord of firewood, some logs for us and maybe some pulp is about all I ever get in 1 day.

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2538 on: October 17, 2014, 03:00:57 pm »
100 cord in 1 day stacked on the header would be like the high point in my logging career. :D 1/2 a load of saw logs, 16-24 cord of firewood, some logs for us and maybe some pulp is about all I ever get in 1 day.
I hear you, but I bet if you went and got the million dollars and bought a new CTL team and were cutting the same wood, your pile would be just as big or bigger at the end of the day. Production is a very relative concept. If I'm hand falling and cable skidding by myself, I'm quite proud of 10 cords ;)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline BargeMonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2539 on: October 17, 2014, 09:37:05 pm »
 I gotcha. I wasnt breaking your stones, more of pointing out that region and wood type have alot to do for production. If I had to keep 90-100+ cord to the header every day I would be out of business pretty quick, not a lack of wood, I dont think you could move fast enough. Your seeing a touch more CTL around here but cable skidders are still 100-1 vs forwarders, i will admit it does do a cleaner job. I see a new 644K MH and a 100' stacker coming before anymore wood equipment unfortunately.  ;)