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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880911 times)

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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2340 on: November 24, 2013, 11:00:53 pm »
Neat project, Ken ;)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2341 on: November 24, 2013, 11:39:26 pm »
Good photo documentation.
~Ron

Offline redneck

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2342 on: November 27, 2013, 04:07:39 pm »
Great looking road! Are you building the road to access a future harvest site? or were you hired just to build the road?
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Offline 240b

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2343 on: November 27, 2013, 05:29:42 pm »
I work alone with my cable skidder and crane  These are from the summer and fall.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2344 on: November 28, 2013, 04:29:39 am »
Great looking road! Are you building the road to access a future harvest site? or were you hired just to build the road?
redneck   We are also cutting a bit more than a 1000 cord off the block at this time.  The company that owns it plans to wait another 5-10 years before harvesting the remainder.

240b  Nice pics except that second to last one.  It looks like it was a wet mitten day.  We sure don't get that quality of maple around here.
Lots of toys for working in the bush

Offline br389

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2345 on: November 28, 2013, 04:54:08 am »
Where abouts are you located?

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2346 on: December 29, 2013, 12:28:28 am »
Been a while since I've been on here, kept overly busy this past year building a business and specialty equipment. Bought some beasts of the forest. Tigercat 630B,  Tigercat 635, JD 648GII and a JD 748E... the 635:

 





Offline kiko

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2347 on: December 29, 2013, 04:10:35 am »
Nice to hear from u again bobus , are logging or buying and selling equipment? If you need any help with those tigercats, let me know I may be of assistance.  They are well build but different from the rest. 

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2348 on: December 29, 2013, 09:22:29 am »
Don't see to many of them rigs in my area.
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Offline Stephen Alford

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2349 on: December 29, 2013, 09:31:16 am »
 Nor here.
logon

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2350 on: December 29, 2013, 12:23:15 pm »
Nice to hear from u again bobus , are logging or buying and selling equipment? If you need any help with those tigercats, let me know I may be of assistance.  They are well build but different from the rest.

Still working for a utility construction company building all terrain cranes and diggers (pics of the completed rigs too come) and working hard at upgrading from the one man, saw and 440 to a fully mechanized operation. Got a boom delimber found, and maybe a Timbco, still figuring on a skidder. Just unsure what to get (working with those Tigercats was a game changer)
 

Offline redneck logger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2351 on: December 29, 2013, 02:47:10 pm »
Nice to see Bobus2003  back ,hope you can make a go of things that skidder is a neat-o beast,long ways since the old stroke head and  cable skidder good work :new_year: :new_year:
got to love working in the woods

Offline kiko

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2352 on: December 29, 2013, 09:49:44 pm »
Why not get a knuckle boom, loader and delimiter, so much less maintain ace and expense of a stroker. Skilled operator meet mill specs around here without the auto measure day in day out. Even top size. That big skidder would work a stroke delimiter silly.  I have seen those  635 bring 13 to 15 ton per turn, but they don't  get around good picking up they wood, they need a small skidder dry decking at the main skid road. True story  A customer of mine half cut a track of same age wood with conventional delimbing equipment the other half was processed with a brand name harvester and the conventional crew cut out more logs than the harvester.  It was a bet and they flipped for which half got processed with what. More logs on the conventional side , maybe.  Operation skill me thinks. I do under stand southern logging is different and the methods are different.  So there is the disclaimer  for feeling the processor or stroker is a waste of time and money, cause they are around here. 

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2353 on: December 29, 2013, 11:45:34 pm »
Kiko, that 635 came out of Southern Georgia.. Its not a machine that can/could be used here very well. Most our timber sales are too small with leave trees to close. I bought it and had it shipped up here and we outfitted it with a 27' pressure drill.
I know what your saying about a boom delimber, especially after watching an operation in Florida/Georgia this summer, but the limbs we have on the P-Pine would tear up a knuckle boom and limber where the Timberline booms were built for these trees. My biggest problem currently is what brand of skidder to go after. I've ran many Deeres and really liked them so I thought a 648/748 would be good, but after seeing and running the Tigercat 630B I think one of them would be a big producer compared to the Deeres unless it was a 848..

Offline kiko

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2354 on: December 30, 2013, 03:10:05 am »
Did you remove any of the grapple boom parts to fit the drill?  If so I might be interested in purchasing those parts from you employer if they are so inclined.

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2355 on: December 30, 2013, 09:46:57 am »
Kiko, PM Sent

Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2356 on: January 02, 2014, 07:29:26 pm »
I thought I'd put some pictures on here from some of our harvesting labs this fall.

First off is a john deere 700 series buncher working in a mixedwood clearcut.
 

 
Whole trees were taken to roadside by an 848h grapple skidder.
 

 
A 2054 processor delimbed and bucked at roadside. Not sure what Warratah head was on this machine. (Sorry for the Picture quality, it was a bright day)
 

 

The logs were then sorted by a loader (No picture for that). There were 5 or 6 different  products being cut here. The smaller diameter stems were being chipped for hog fuel or pulp chips.

Offline JohnM

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2357 on: January 03, 2014, 09:43:08 am »
The smaller diameter stems were being chipped for hog fuel or pulp chips.
Showing my ignorance here but what is "hog fuel"?  Great pics/write-up, Mark.
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Online beenthere

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2358 on: January 03, 2014, 10:36:35 am »
Hog fuel likely (or can sometimes) mean it is being shipped to someone running a co-gen system, and burning the chipped (hogged) wood for heat and/or electricity.

Sometimes the chipper is referred to as the "hog".
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Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2359 on: January 03, 2014, 04:28:35 pm »
The smaller diameter stems were being chipped for hog fuel or pulp chips.
Showing my ignorance here but what is "hog fuel"?  Great pics/write-up, Mark.

Hog fuel is basically the same as pulp chips except the bark, branches and leaves/needles are chipped as well. Like beenthere said it's used in cogen plants or burned for heat.

Next few are from a "commercial thinning" in a mixed stand of spruce and fir. There were two different methods used here, the first was a short wood system utilizing a kioti forester manufactured by payeur distributions out of quebec.
 

 
The forester is a stock kioti tractor attached to a metavic forwarding trailer. The tractor has full rops canopy, belly plates, protection for the engine and a hydraulic winch.