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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880863 times)

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Offline JohnM

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2320 on: October 27, 2013, 06:57:26 pm »
Good to know, thank you guys.  I've seen those on powerlines as well Ray, just couldn't tell if those were the same thing that Ron posted...they are a bit 'rougher' than I had seen. ;D
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2321 on: October 27, 2013, 09:47:33 pm »
The John Deere 1270E  processor works a CTL harvest in a red pine plantation. Bougrand timber harvest, October 2013.
 

 
Various CTL products such as 22 foot hops poles (becoming popular with the increasing brew makers), small sawlogs, and pulpwood are cut and placed for the following forwarder to pick up and forward to the landing. 
 

 
~Ron

Offline WDH

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2322 on: October 28, 2013, 07:49:55 am »
Those are some straight logs.
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Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2323 on: October 28, 2013, 10:12:45 am »
Nice looking red pine stand Ron. Tell us more about the 22 foot hops poles. I've never heard about that product here. Are the volumes needed significant?

Gary
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2324 on: October 28, 2013, 10:17:10 am »
I grew some hops this summer. Did not do much last year,first planting,but they grew this year. We did not havest the fruit.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2325 on: October 28, 2013, 10:48:51 am »
The "hops poles" were a new product for me also. I wasn't aware of this market until this red pine producer had a market for them and started cutting them. I'm not that familiar with the growing of hops but I guess they need long poles up to 22 feet. With all the micro beer brewerys going in around here I guess that there is more demand for hops and the long pine poles necessary to grow them.
~Ron

Offline beenthere

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2326 on: October 28, 2013, 11:08:49 am »
Googled "Hops growing" and several pics shown of the "pole" stand that the hops grow up.

one for instance
http://brewutah.blogspot.com/2011/01/start-hops-co-op.html

Appears to be a product that could withstand some hop-pole butt treatment with a preservative before it goes into the ground. Looks to be some real expensive layout that is involved.
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Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2327 on: October 28, 2013, 12:26:41 pm »
There is a small hop yard where I used to work. Similar setup. Rows of poles with cables strung between them. They used locust poles.
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Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2328 on: October 28, 2013, 06:16:40 pm »
That's a nice stand of pine Ron.  I've never had an opportunity to work in planted pine.  I'm guessing a stand like that would lend to high production even in a partial cut. 
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Offline NWP

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2329 on: October 28, 2013, 07:26:25 pm »
I had a guy call me a year or so ago wanting long black locust poles for something like that. I think he said he was growing grapes or something. I didn't have anything but I was curious why used light/telephone poles wouldn't work?  They would be a lot cheaper. Around here you can usually get them for free and they are still in ok shape.

In the link BT posted, it looks like they are using pressure treated poles.
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Online barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2330 on: October 28, 2013, 10:51:54 pm »
I had to pick up some mats today, sorry for more of my fuzzy through the windshield photos ::) This was an area on a haul road that had a swamp "flowage" through it.
 
These things are heavy, you have to crowd right up next to the machine to lift them, even then the crane just barely lifts them over.
 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline OlympicYJ

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2331 on: October 29, 2013, 01:18:27 am »
In WA state we had allot of hop poles made out of alder, Alnus rubra. I don't know of any alder hop pole markets now; but back when my dad was in high school, mid 60's, him and my uncle cut some but they were mostly doing plug poles for paper rolls. The hop poles went to Eastern WA mostly around Yakima. They used to grow lots of hops and still do but don't know how much anymore.

Offline Kodiakmac

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2332 on: October 30, 2013, 07:09:19 am »
I've heard snowbird farmers talking about cutting their trees in the winter like this picture shows.  Then they say they go back in the spring and cut the 10 or 12 foot butt cut.  :D

HEEE, Heeeeeeeee......... :laugh:

That reminds me of what my Dad used to say if we didn't tramp down or clean out the snow around the butt before falling (felling): "When are you going to come back and get that cord?"
Robin Hood had it just about right:  as long as a man has family, friends, deer and beer...he needs very little government!
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2333 on: November 06, 2013, 06:17:11 pm »
The John Deere 1270 Processor lays down various products in this CTL red pine thinning. A Ponsee Gazelle Forwarder will follow and remove the cut wood to
the landing for trucking.
 

  

 
~Ron

Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2334 on: November 06, 2013, 06:32:24 pm »
Ron do you now what the pre and post harvest volumes were and let us know the age of the stand?
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Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2335 on: November 07, 2013, 04:04:35 pm »
I'm surprised they would be able to thin a red pine plantation with stems that size. all the rp plantations around here that I've seen don't have the crown size to even respond to a thinning when they reach that size. That stand looks really good though.

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2336 on: November 07, 2013, 06:04:25 pm »
What is the red pine used for? We've got a bunch of it here on the farm. Other than 50 poles sold in the  '90's for a log cabin restoration, we've never found a viable market, or use on the farm, for it.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2337 on: November 10, 2013, 08:43:31 pm »
Ken,

This is a 63 year old red pine stand. It was previously thinned about 13 years ago by removing every third row. Prior to this second thinning, the stand contained 12,500 trees at an average of .083 cords/tree for a 1,038 cords total volume. The basal area averaged 190-200 sq. ft.basal area.

The second thinning by a selection harvest took the basal area down to an avearge basal area of 90 sq. ft. 3,184 trees were removed for 265 cords harvested. Approximately
25 % of the trees were removed in this second thinning. It was primarily a thinning "from below" removing the worst first.

Dave,

Red pine is used for sawlogs and structural wood in the housing industry, cabin logs, utility poles, landscaping timbers, hops poles as in this harvest, pulpwood, etc. There is a good red pine market in this area.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2338 on: November 10, 2013, 10:10:31 pm »
The Gazelle Ponsee Forwarder moves the red pine products for sorting at the landing. Bougrand timber harvest 10/13.
 

  

 
~Ron

Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2339 on: November 24, 2013, 08:30:49 pm »
Time to bring this thread back up to the top

We are building a roadway through a 33 year old stand that was pre-commercially thinned in 1993.  Predominately balsam fir with some red maple and white birch.  Locally there are thousands of acres that will soon be available for harvest work again.  Although the piece size will be small these stands will be nice to work in due to their uniformity.

  

 

The new roadway will be slightly more than a mile with 3 turnouts and 4 pipe installations.  We pile the grubbings to one side of the roadway, dig a trench for road bed material and then fill in the trench with the grubbings.

  

 

One of the pipe installations required a no grub zone so we had to use a gravel truck to move enough material to cross this wet area.   

  

 

Cheers
Ken
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