The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881191 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Tillaway

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1219
  • Location: Tillamook, Oregon
  • Gender: Male
  • Funny looking tall guy.
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #220 on: September 06, 2002, 03:02:59 pm »



Roads should be maintained to provide adequate sighting distances.  This is a mainline haul road on the Plumas National Forest in California.  This road is driven by the public to access private property and recreational sites.  Log trucks were using this road when the picture was taken.

Making Tillamook Bay safe for bait; one salmon at a time.

Offline Tillaway

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1219
  • Location: Tillamook, Oregon
  • Gender: Male
  • Funny looking tall guy.
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #221 on: September 06, 2002, 03:10:53 pm »


This is the same road as previous image.
Some roads are difficult to build and maintain.  This is the end of a section of road that keeps sliding into the creek.  It should be relocated and engineered to stay on the hill.

Also there are inadequate pulloffs on this section which is about a mile long.  
Making Tillamook Bay safe for bait; one salmon at a time.

Offline Tillaway

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1219
  • Location: Tillamook, Oregon
  • Gender: Male
  • Funny looking tall guy.
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #222 on: September 06, 2002, 03:30:25 pm »


40" 16' Douglas Fir log, about 1000 bf.



48" 16' Douglas Fir log, over 1000 bf.



Cull deck.



Oak logs... no market.


California's lack of markets and high hauling costs leads to lots of wasted logs.  This should lead to lots of opprotunities for small portable mill owners but rarely does.  The California Forest Practices Rules discourage these opprotunities.  You will need to be a Licensed Timber Operator, and file a salvage exemtion with the Calfornia Department of Forestry to get these.  As a general rule, large land owners in the state will not allow salvaging these logs due to liabilty reasons.  You will have to have a minimum of $2;000,000 liability policy and you will not be allowed to mill on site.
Making Tillamook Bay safe for bait; one salmon at a time.

Offline Tom

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 25854
  • Age: 74
  • Location: Jacksonville, Florida
  • Gender: Male
    • Toms Saw
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #223 on: September 06, 2002, 04:13:19 pm »
What does it take to be a "Licensed Timber Operator"?  Could a Miller operate under a Broker's insurance policy?
If the wood is on Privately owned land, why couldn't the miller mill on site?  I don't understand where the landowner loses the right to process his own trees.  If the miller were milling the salvage logs for the landowner, would the State still prohibit the operation?  Would the landowner then have to be a "Licensed Timber Operator"?

How does the State explain the logs left in the woods to Environmentalist Whacko's when there is a market for the salvaged wood?  I would think that the Government could encur as much grief over this as the landowner may encur from the Wackos for harvesting in the first place.

Just trying to understand because obviously, I don't.  ???

I sure wish I could get my saw to those logs. :)
extinct

Offline Tillaway

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 1219
  • Location: Tillamook, Oregon
  • Gender: Male
  • Funny looking tall guy.
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #224 on: September 06, 2002, 04:34:14 pm »
Good questions Tom.

In these pictures these logs belong to a large industrial land owner with no milling capacity.

Large land owners in California are very shy about liabilty.  They believe that the economic gain is overshadowed by the possibilty of a lawsuit caused by the operation. (Fire, accident on the road etc.)  Also, many times it will cost more to process the paperwork than the logs are worth.

You only lose the right to process your own trees when you sell the lumber or other final product.  You used to be able to cut and process your own trees for personal consumption with any regs.  This was abused (Large Ski Resort near Tahoe) and now the regs apply but to what extent I don't know.

To harvest any logs in California even on your own land you have to be a LTO.  This includes firewood.

A miller can mill logs... just don't ask any questions about the logs source.  The miller will not get in trouble... the land owner will.

Insurance requirements are up to the land owner, most require $2,000,000 or more.  The state will not issue an LTO license without proof of $1,000,000 logger broad form.  A land owner can get this requirement waved if they log on their own land only.
Making Tillamook Bay safe for bait; one salmon at a time.

Offline Frank_Pender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3334
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #225 on: September 07, 2002, 08:28:31 pm »
Then, in order to log your own land you have to put a plan together that is put together by a certified foresters that certain fees and reg. that he must file and pay for?  This could or will cost you several thousands of dollars?  I see in the future that Oregon woodland owners will be falling into this trap?! :'( :-[
Frank Pender

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #226 on: September 12, 2002, 07:05:23 pm »
Valmet 544X Forwarder. It comes over the hill on the skid road to pick up another load on the Five Oaks Hunt Club timber harvest.



~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #227 on: September 13, 2002, 07:11:16 pm »
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Loads oak sawlogs for transport to the landing. Five Oaks Hunt Club Timber Harvest.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #228 on: September 16, 2002, 12:15:43 pm »
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Carries load of oak to the landing. Five Oaks Hunt Club timber Harvest.



~Ron

Online Corley5

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7572
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wolverine, Michigan USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Wolverine, Michigan
    • Whittaker Farms
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #229 on: September 16, 2002, 07:06:22 pm »
Where's Five Oaks Hunt Club?
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #230 on: September 17, 2002, 09:00:14 am »
It's a small private hunt club southeast of Manton, MI and north of Long Lake neighboring State forest land. Cabin and property is owned by 3 brothers and associates from Novi, Dearborn, MI area.

They contract ARC Consulting Services for their land & resource management planning, timber harvests etc.

Another such hunt club I work with is Circle V Hunt Club up on Wheeler Creek north of the Manistee river east of Sherman, Mi and south of Traverse City, MI. It also neighbors State forest land. Such clubs have a lot of huntable acres with the public use of adjoining State forest lands.

The Circle V Hunt Club won the Wexford County Conservationist of the Year award a few years ago due to their land and resource management planning and projects.

~Ron

StIhL_MaGnUm_1

  • Guest
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #231 on: September 28, 2002, 08:11:00 am »
Ron,

        You got any new pics of any harvest's??

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #232 on: September 29, 2002, 08:30:15 am »
Not right now. Should have some more soon; didn't want to bore you. Hopefully others will post some. I would like to see some from other parts of the country.
~Ron

StIhL_MaGnUm_1

  • Guest
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #233 on: September 29, 2002, 09:08:26 am »
Hey Ron here's on of my friends site's with my skidder and his forwarder

http://www.mackenziechamber.bc.ca/skidder_forwarder.jpg

Offline Bro. Noble

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 3773
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Drury, Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Road Closures
« Reply #234 on: September 29, 2002, 02:42:30 pm »
Boy I wish I had a digital camera !
Several posts ago Ron showed a picture of a logging road blocked by two large rocks.  About 6 miles north of us there is a logging road closed the same way.  The rocks are about belly button high.  Yesterday morning we went by there and there was an old junky looking 4WD pickup with big tires balanced on top of the rocks.  I can't wait to hear the rest of the story.

Noble
milking and logging and sawing and milking

Offline Tom

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 25854
  • Age: 74
  • Location: Jacksonville, Florida
  • Gender: Male
    • Toms Saw
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #235 on: September 29, 2002, 03:00:15 pm »
Was he balanced on his wheels or his rocker panels?  It makes a big difference. :D

If he was on his wheels, it is a great sign of defiance. ::)
If he was on his rocker panels it was a sign of defeat ??? ;D :D
extinct

Offline Bro. Noble

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 3773
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Drury, Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #236 on: September 29, 2002, 05:40:10 pm »
All four tires were in the air.  I thought maybe the landowner had put it there to be funny, but it was gone this morning.  I'll bet someone was wearing a real sheepish look.

Noble
milking and logging and sawing and milking

Offline DanG

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 13391
  • Age: 71
  • Location: Chattahoochee, Florida USA
  • Gender: Male
  • DanG, The Official ForestryForum Cussword
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #237 on: September 29, 2002, 09:04:57 pm »
Noble, you don't have to spend a lot of money to own a digital camera. Go to  Walmart and look for a Vivitar "Vivicam 10."  It is a point and shoot digital camera that sells for under $50. Comes with all the software you need, and takes some pretty nifty pictures.  If I wasn't so lazy, I'd learn how to post pics and show you some samples.

BTW, it isn't displayed with the fancy cameras. It comes on a bubble wrap card and you will find it over with the Instamatic type rigs.
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline Bro. Noble

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 3773
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Drury, Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #238 on: September 29, 2002, 11:46:04 pm »
DanG, I appreciate that info.

Now all I need is a new computer that can handle the pictures.  I see one advertised on TV for about $700 with all the bells and whistles I would need.
We visited our kids at college this weekend.  Our son is working on a PHD in math and teaches a couple of classes.  He had a little work that had to be done at his office so I went along to check the forum.  Their computers were so much faster than this one it was unreal.  The moniter was about one inch thick.  There was a plug-in on the keyboard to hook the digital camera direct.  I WANT ONE !!

Noble
milking and logging and sawing and milking

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #239 on: September 30, 2002, 05:31:24 pm »
Stihl,

Excellent pictures and some impressive equipment. I note that you are usually chained up or have tracks on the rubber tires. Do you run this way all the time in New Hampshire or can you run straight rubber?
~Ron