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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880758 times)

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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2040 on: September 29, 2012, 06:45:57 pm »
That's more like it. So what would the landing price be (or millside price, whichever you would know more easily) ? For comparing, then to now. Back then I think it was $42 landing, $50 mill price.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2041 on: September 29, 2012, 08:30:10 pm »
You would have a tough time getting much more than $50/cord on the landing now in this area (for aspen pulp) unless you have a coveted UPM Blandin contract, that keeps the haul short. Otherwise the haul distance gets to be over 100 miles to the other paper mills, pushing trucking rates well over $30/cord. $80-$85/cord delivered on the aspen pulp, do the math and you can see why you don't want large equipment payments ::) I logged my place about 6 years ago, I was getting $102/cord delivered for my aspen, and it only cost about $15/cord to get it there. We still had local (23 miles) OSB mills, and they were all hungry for wood. Three of those OSB mills shut down that spring, never to open again. The good old days ::)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2042 on: September 29, 2012, 10:34:20 pm »
When I was a kid in Maine in the '80's, it was still the hey-day of logging up there. Didn't matter what you wanted to do, saw-logs, firewood, pulp, veneer, tree-length, 4-foot pulp, bolt-wood, bio-mass, selective cut, clear-cut, skidders, forwarders, bulldozers, jitterbugs, conversion trucks, wheelers, semi's, farm tractors, power trailers, bombardiers, pulp trains, furniture, fencing, post and beam, you name it. Chainsaw:resident ratio, around 2:1. Skidder:resident ratio, around 1:20. Wood meant money. Lots of money. You could make an honest living. If you were industrious, you could make a killing. If you were ingenious, you could make a fortune.

Now. . . . .




 :'(
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Turbosawmill 8" cut GX390 Warrior Sawmill, 13hp Honda
MS290 Stihl

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2043 on: October 06, 2012, 06:17:27 pm »
Old Frankin skidder,no idea what it had for a motor in it. Was raining hard when I stopped,there's a rain drop in the 3rd and 4th picture. This was working in the woods when I saw it. I do not know the year,but I like to see the old stuff being used. It looked to be a clean machine. It did not have grease and oil all over it.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline treefarmer87

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2044 on: October 07, 2012, 12:21:59 pm »
looks like a late 60s early 70s franklin 132 in really good shape like you said :)
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Offline lumberjack48

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2045 on: October 07, 2012, 06:26:54 pm »
When I was a kid in Maine in the '80's, it was still the hey-day of logging up there. Didn't matter what you wanted to do, saw-logs, firewood, pulp, veneer, tree-length, 4-foot pulp, bolt-wood, bio-mass, selective cut, clear-cut, skidders, forwarders, bulldozers, jitterbugs, conversion trucks, wheelers, semi's, farm tractors, power trailers, bombardiers, pulp trains, furniture, fencing, post and beam, you name it. Chainsaw:resident ratio, around 2:1. Skidder:resident ratio, around 1:20. Wood meant money. Lots of money. You could make an honest living. If you were industrious, you could make a killing. If you were ingenious, you could make a fortune.

Now. . . . .




 :'(

Around here in the 60s and 70s, everybody or anybody could get a job logging. Every little town had one or two timber buyers, i even had-em come out to the house. Most of the farmers logged over the winter months.
1980 the logging industry here took a dive, after that logging was just a dog-eat-dog job.

barbender i have cut many thousands of cords of that kind of blow down with a saw an cable skidder in the 80s. That was one of my nick names [blown down Nelson] in the 60s an 70s it was [Easy-Money]


Third generation logger, owner operator, 30 yrs felling experience with pole skidder. I got my neck broke back in 89, left me a quad. The wife kept the job going up to 96.

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2046 on: October 07, 2012, 06:46:07 pm »
Blow Down Nelson...I like that :D It's dangerous stuff, everything is loaded.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline keen

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2047 on: October 13, 2012, 05:29:45 pm »

Great thread took me a while to get through the whole thing. Alot of great pics from members.


 

Heres a red pine skid on a job a few weeks ago. 10" dbh was about the average tree size. 8" and over went to the local amish for tounge and groove paneling. 5"-7" was sold to a local fence post company and will be peeled and treated. 2"-4" was sent to pennsylvania for furniture making. The 2"-4" was the money maker on the job since they can not be processer cut furniture makers are having a hard time finding them and are paying top dollar.
   

Offline Maine372

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2048 on: October 13, 2012, 05:50:10 pm »
whodathunkit! 2-4" diameter material being the money maker!

whats your machine keen? C5D?

Offline keen

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2049 on: October 13, 2012, 06:17:47 pm »
Its a c5d with a deutz 5 cylinder. It does pretty good for us, for what it is.  I had a few loggers and truckers see my pile of 2"-4" stuff and say " Your getting a pretty good pile of pulp wood" and have them say that they are getting roughly $60 a cord for it. When I say im getting $250 a cord on the landing there jaw drops. Being a low production chainsaw crew we really have to shop for the right market to be able to make a decent profit.

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2050 on: October 13, 2012, 08:09:51 pm »
I just saw a craigslist ad looking for that same stuff, keen. Same problem, feed roller tracks don't look very good on your log furniture ::)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline 1270d

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2051 on: October 13, 2012, 08:24:50 pm »
Would they take it if it was cut with a stroke processor?  Like a little tapio or something like it?

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2052 on: October 13, 2012, 10:16:08 pm »
Keen, that is EXACTLY the proper way to log. It sounds like you are making money.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

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Offline keen

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2053 on: October 14, 2012, 09:59:49 am »
Im not sure on a stroke processor 1270d, never thought of that. Its a good idea. I have never seen wood in person cut by one. Does it just remove some of the bark as it slides? I wouldn't think a  little scrape here and there on the wood would be a big deal. Where about in the UP are you? I was up there two weeks ago and fished the carp river and the black river. I'm from mid michigan(gladwin).

Offline 1270d

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2054 on: October 14, 2012, 10:14:16 am »
I ve never run a stroker but I don't think there would be a whole lot of bark disturbance.  If the knives were kept nice and sharp I think they would limb really clean also.  I live about a quarter of a mile from the carp.  Definately one of the smaller sections of the river though

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2055 on: October 14, 2012, 01:32:00 pm »
If he knifes are sharp, and the machines running good Stroke Processors don't disturb much.. They scrap some bark of (in many cases very nicely without touching the wood) but they do sometimes gouge the wood..

Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2056 on: October 14, 2012, 05:28:43 pm »
Nice looking skid behind that C5D keen.  I agree that we all have to aggressively market our products and services in the hopes of finding those "niche" markets.  Be careful though how often you spread the word about really good markets as there are those who would be more than willing to fill the market for a bit less.

Cheers
Ken
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2057 on: November 27, 2012, 08:52:04 pm »
This is a Clark skidder. I don't see many of these in my area.

 

 

I have no idea the year. This is just a guy with a skidder and a chainsaw. This was a real small job. I doubt even 4 acres. It's between 2 roads and one side has a house on it and the other side was cut off a few years ago.
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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2058 on: November 27, 2012, 09:46:44 pm »
I knew a guy in Burnham, Maine, who had a Clark Ranger for a while. Back in the late '80's, early '90's maybe.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

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Offline WDH

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2059 on: November 27, 2012, 09:59:03 pm »
I used to see them many years ago.  Now, down here, you very rarely see a cable skidder of any type anymore.
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