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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881313 times)

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Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2020 on: September 08, 2012, 11:04:47 am »
 
An interesting find, its a rifle slug that was in my backcut. Odds of splitting it in half are slim, but I suppose its better I found it with a chainsaw than the mill finding it with the 8inch band headrig!
 
Heres a what not to do! This was a job from last winter, as a favor to the farmer we were cutting and shoving over some nasty leaners that were hanging into the hay field. It was one of the colder days and this little black birches hinge didnt hold. I should have known better and it would have hurt being a bigger tree, but being as it was small its sort of laughable now.
 
Cherry sale summer 2011, the boss making sure I am doing it right.
It ain't easy...

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2021 on: September 08, 2012, 11:13:45 am »
I love my job and love to work, but its nice to get away and leave it all behind once in awhile. My wife and I love the outdoors and the northern mountains. Heres the adirondacks, summer 2011

It ain't easy...

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2022 on: September 08, 2012, 07:40:26 pm »
Nice!
~Ron

Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2023 on: September 08, 2012, 10:12:38 pm »

Cherry sale summer 2011, the boss making sure I am doing it right.

Looks like he's a nightmare to work for.  :D

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2024 on: September 09, 2012, 06:26:49 am »
Good pictures. I see you don't run chains in the summer.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2025 on: September 09, 2012, 08:32:03 am »
The rings stay on in the front. My front tires are still in good shape overall without any big cuts but the tread is worn to nothing. I run the studs in the winter or in the rocks, but those double diamonds just fill full of mud. Had to take them off when I did a big clearing job and was up to the axles. I dont like running in mud that deep, but when there is an excavator right behind you grubbing its not as big a deal.
It ain't easy...

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2026 on: September 09, 2012, 01:11:02 pm »
The rings stay on in the front. My front tires are still in good shape overall without any big cuts but the tread is worn to nothing. I run the studs in the winter or in the rocks, but those double diamonds just fill full of mud. Had to take them off when I did a big clearing job and was up to the axles. I dont like running in mud that deep, but when there is an excavator right behind you grubbing its not as big a deal.

What you just described is called routine logging in Maine, any time but winter. In winter of course, you hope to be able to stay on top of frozen ground for the most part. They dragged bottom logging my dad's place in September of '91.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2027 on: September 10, 2012, 08:27:07 am »
I missed the front chains in the picture.
Okrafarmer,sorry not all of Maine was like your Dad's place.  :(   I look at ALOT of logging jobs in Maine. Some I spend some time looking and some I leave very quickly.
If the guy I had cut my land started to make ruts even 6 inches deep,I would kick him off my land so quick he wouldn't even know what happened. I told him I have to get my tractor through the woods. And I told him I would kick him off my land too.He used alot of my trails too.I HATE ruts. My land is good land and I want to keep it that way. I went to check on one job of his while he was cutting. As I was walking up to him he was putting a bunch of brush and limbs in a soft spot so when the forwarder came through it would not sink in. That is one reason why I let him on my land. I have seen deep ruts on some land and I cross that logger off my list.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2028 on: September 10, 2012, 08:41:23 am »
People may be more sensitive to it these days. My dad didn't like the ruts, but he knew it was part of the price of admission, especially on his soil type. His solution was to buy a D-6 and fix the road a couple years later. He also used the D-6 to clear the stumps out of the clear cut area and build a pond. All things he had wanted to do anyway. His 2-ton John Deere tractor made ruts too. The same logger logged off a much bigger section of land a mile down the road, a year or so later, and I saw the road they came out of, they were dragging bottom there too. Not much you can do about it sometimes. On another piece of land nearby, they logged it and the ruts weren't too deep because it was better soil and it was fairly dry when they logged it. That piece got bulldozed out and reclaimed for hay field, which is what it was before the trees grew back up in it.

Maine has many different soil types, even within the space of a mile, multiple soil types can often be found. We lived in one of the glacial deposit areas, and the soil types were especially spotty. The bulk of our land was minarda clay, which is particularly messy. I got Dad's D-4 stuck in it twice. The guy who bought Dad's D-4 from him sank it up to the hood the day he drove it off the truck.  :o I remember our next door neighbor with his Oliver 77 stuck up to the axles in his front yard, our other neighbor's Allis WD-45 sat stuck in the mud for over a year. Our road was discontinued past our house, but as a logging road, continued through to the next town. Dad pulled at least a dozen lost souls' cars, vans, and 4X4 trucks out of the mud on that road over the years. "Stuck-in-the-mud" was almost one word in the local vernacular.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

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MS290 Stihl

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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2029 on: September 18, 2012, 09:57:22 pm »
This morning's view, the fall colors are getting here.

Ponsse Ergo working blowdown in one of the hardest hit areas from our July 3rd windstorm.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2030 on: September 18, 2012, 10:02:03 pm »
We had this huge area of blowdown, and now it is this dry in the sand country
 
Some more blowdown, this is aspen on the NE shore of Ball Club lake
 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2031 on: September 18, 2012, 10:08:51 pm »
Another landing shot, sometimes we will team up two or even three forwarders to get a job hammered out
 
Nature shot, this hawk followed the machine around the whole time I was on this job, must have thought I was going to rustle up some grub for him
 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2032 on: September 18, 2012, 10:25:19 pm »
That looks like a mess. I had a hawk that would follow me around too.especailly when I got too close to his or her nest. Than the hawk would get too close to me. :o
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2033 on: September 18, 2012, 10:44:41 pm »
That's a long haul being that heavy, Bobus. There's plenty of steep grades too. Hwy 85? All I know is 500 hp and an 18 speed kind of spoils a guy ;)

Yeah its a Good Haul, Can't wait too be Done Working Up there. The Oil traffic Sucks.. Hardest part on hwy 85 is the Climb out of the Little Missouri River south of Watford City.. It would be differnt driving if i didn't have a 18spd, and 550hp

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2034 on: September 29, 2012, 12:08:24 am »
We're still working blowdown, it keeps me close to home is the good part about it.
 

 

This is a Red Pine plantation a I thinned about 5 years ago, it is about 50% on the ground, 25% bent, and 25% undamaged.

 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline WDH

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2035 on: September 29, 2012, 06:57:26 am »
What an awful mess  :).
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2036 on: September 29, 2012, 07:23:54 am »
Lots of money lost with that storm. that is too bad. Is this a land owner lot or a company? Acres? Nice and ALOT safer to do all that from a cab.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2037 on: September 29, 2012, 09:44:08 am »
We've been cutting all small private lots, these landowners have really taken a beating on the stumpage. This sale was $5/cd on the aspen. The dangle head processor is the only way to fly in this stuff, IMO. It would be a death trap to try and cut by hand, and a hot saw doesn't work very well in it either.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2038 on: September 29, 2012, 09:53:21 am »
Wow, I remember getting $42 a cord on the landing for aspen back in 1998. And thinking how that was a pitifully poor return on my time for cutting it. I guess you're talking about what the landowner gets, $5 / a cord. What would be normal price these days to pay a land owner for good standing aspen?
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Turbosawmill 8" cut GX390 Warrior Sawmill, 13hp Honda
MS290 Stihl

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2039 on: September 29, 2012, 04:50:41 pm »
$20-$30/cord for aspen prior to it being blown down. Most of these sales have been $10/cord, this one was administered by the MN DNR because of a conservation easement, they dropped the stumpage in half because the Doctor that owns the property needed the access road to his cabin on the property cleared out by the duck opener ::)
 
Too many irons in the fire