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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881004 times)

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Offline Woodhauler

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2000 on: September 04, 2012, 08:07:38 pm »
Very nice photos.  We have the greatest view from our offfice windows, don't we?

Lj, we had a trucker hauling for us a few years ago who hauled in an evening load of tamarack pulp like that.  Crossed the scales over 205000.
Back in 1995 i loaded a load of studwood spruce/fir on a 3 axle bws trailer behind a 500hp mack tractor, 160,000 pounds! Guy hauled it from jackson maine to canada! Went across the border in jackman maine! Around 140 miles one way!
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Offline chevytaHOE5674

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2001 on: September 04, 2012, 08:49:54 pm »
Very nice photos.  We have the greatest view from our offfice windows, don't we?

Lj, we had a trucker hauling for us a few years ago who hauled in an evening load of tamarack pulp like that.  Crossed the scales over 205000.

I too have seen a few loads of wood between 205,000 and 210,000 cross the scales in the dark of night. That's on an 11 axle "Michigan Truck"... Only 40,000 overweight  :D

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2002 on: September 04, 2012, 11:07:55 pm »
That kind of weight is crazy, have any of you ever pullled a load that heavy? I've had a couple #120,000 + loads on, you know you have a load behind you, even with 500hp.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Bandmill Bandit

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2003 on: September 04, 2012, 11:16:39 pm »
never pulled a load over a 100K lb but have seen a few loads of logs that scaled right at the 200 to 215 K. Some of the oilfield hauling you see in this country dont even get scaled cause there isn't a scale that you can get the rigs on to even weigh em.
If you ain't livin on the edge you are takin up way to much room. Of course at my age if I get too close to that edge any more theres a good chance I may fall off.
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Offline Woodhauler

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2004 on: September 05, 2012, 08:20:15 am »
That kind of weight is crazy, have any of you ever pulled a load that heavy? I've had a couple #120,000 + loads on, you know you have a load behind you, even with 500hp.
I have grossed in 108000 with my tri axle self loader truck back in the day! HAVE the biggest loads hauled into several mills! 8600bf of saw logs! Hauled 8000bf on a regular occurrence!
2013 westernstar tri-axle with 2015 rotobec elite 80 loader!Sold 2000 westernstar tractor with stairs air ride trailer and a 1985 huskybrute 175 T/L loader!

Offline Bandmill Bandit

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2005 on: September 05, 2012, 09:29:26 am »
Talked to my brother last night. He is mostly hauling loggin and oil feild equipment now but he said that 100K mark is the norm now for log trucks up north. said he saw one about a week ago where the jeeped tractor had a set of tandem steering axels and triple drivers pulling a trailer with 2 center axels and a triple rear.

He figured they were using a heavy pipe/drill stem hauler to bring out logs to the plup mill from the lease and road clearing and said it looked to be about a load and a half on a regular tri axel trailer rig.

He was going to see if he could get a picture if he caught them on the his haul in there today with the other mud tank.   
If you ain't livin on the edge you are takin up way to much room. Of course at my age if I get too close to that edge any more theres a good chance I may fall off.
2001 Dodge 1500 4x4.
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2 Logright 36 inch cant hooks and a bunch of stuff I built my self

Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2006 on: September 05, 2012, 03:11:54 pm »

This is the Co. truck pulling off the job, he has about 15 cds of Birch saw bolts on, 6 more cords then he can haul legal. Its all back roads to Bigfork and late evening, so why not over load.

I've never seen logs loaded  across the truck like that around here( Perpendicular to the trailer.). Is that a regional thing or is it the old way or what? Seems it would make unloading easier.

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2007 on: September 05, 2012, 04:46:22 pm »
Regional, it's a lakes states thing. I'd guess about 95% of our wood is cut 100", and about 75% of that is hauled crossways. If I remember right, a good crane operator at Sappi could unload a rail trailer with 14 cords of aspen on it in under 3 minutes, it would take 1 minute longer with bunk trailers. Doesn't sound like much but when the trucks are backed up bumper to bumper all day it adds up.
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Offline lumberjack48

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2008 on: September 05, 2012, 04:50:05 pm »

This is the Co. truck pulling off the job, he has about 15 cds of Birch saw bolts on, 6 more cords then he can haul legal. Its all back roads to Bigfork and late evening, so why not over load.

I've never seen logs loaded  across the truck like that around here( Perpendicular to the trailer.). Is that a regional thing or is it the old way or what? Seems it would make unloading easier.
Mark, saw bolts are 100" long same as pulp, he'll be about 30,000 over with the load.

The truck has 6 axles counting the front, the truck is way over built to, heavy rig empty.

Third generation logger, owner operator, 30 yrs felling experience with pole skidder. I got my neck broke back in 89, left me a quad. The wife kept the job going up to 96.

Offline Mark Wentzell

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2009 on: September 05, 2012, 05:16:06 pm »
Thanks guys. Always learning. :P

Offline chevytaHOE5674

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2010 on: September 05, 2012, 05:39:21 pm »
Yeah 95% here is 100" wood loaded crossways on the truck and pup. Only time to load them lengthwise is when you have random length logs to haul. But even then I know a few truckers that haul 10' and 12' logs sideways on the truck, then just offset them so the majority sticks out the passenger side.... In no way shape or form is it legal but some do it because they hate trying to load a few long logs lengthwise and having to splice them in with the rest of the 8' logs.

Offline 1270d

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2011 on: September 05, 2012, 07:20:10 pm »
Wow, never heard of hauling randoms sideways.    Not on the public roadways anyhow.   9 ft wood I have.   Looks normal if its loaded well.   

We had another truck driver crack up a freeze road with ahuge loade of 8 8 sawlogs.  There was no way to fit another stick on the under the loader on the truck and the pup was humped up.  This was 90% frozen hard maple.  I can't imagine what that must have weighed. 

Offline Ken

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2012 on: September 06, 2012, 06:27:03 pm »
Very few local truckers carry wood crossways.  It used to be quite popular as most pulp mills only accepted 8' wood.  Now most of our pulp is cut random length.  Much easier to work with.   

It was great to see this thread again.  Probably my favorite. 

 

 

 

 

In the bottom picture the piles are quite messy.  Sure hard to pile wood evenly when the bark is peeling off.   I do normally take a lot of pride in putting up a neat pile.
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Offline Maine372

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2013 on: September 06, 2012, 10:02:43 pm »
i have to be careful, this story may be about you! my dad saw a guy pull into line in jay when the trucks were backed up out the gate. this was probly 15 years ago. unloaded a triaxle load of wood into that little pull of on the right as you leave the mill. came back twice more that day and threw half the first load on each trip. had the loader heaped right up, but there was no overhead obstacles between the wood and the destination.

That kind of weight is crazy, have any of you ever pulled a load that heavy? I've had a couple #120,000 + loads on, you know you have a load behind you, even with 500hp.
I have grossed in 108000 with my tri axle self loader truck back in the day! HAVE the biggest loads hauled into several mills! 8600bf of saw logs! Hauled 8000bf on a regular occurrence!

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2014 on: September 07, 2012, 09:18:03 pm »
The guy that use to truck for me would load his truck like in lumberjack picture. He would kinda have to throw the wood up towards the cab. This was with a loader up by the cab.He was real good at it. This way he would not have to move his stakes.Now I see most load thier trucks with the wood stacked the same way the truck is going,than cross ways than another tier like the first one.The cross ways one is probably only 6 feet wide. this is all 8 foot pulp.
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Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2015 on: September 08, 2012, 12:21:54 am »
That kind of weight is crazy, have any of you ever pullled a load that heavy? I've had a couple #120,000 + loads on, you know you have a load behind you, even with 500hp.

Hauled our crane to Williston ND (355 miles) Grossed out at 141,000 lbs It was a pull but the ole 550hp CAT did well

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2016 on: September 08, 2012, 10:30:27 am »
That's a long haul being that heavy, Bobus. There's plenty of steep grades too. Hwy 85? All I know is 500 hp and an 18 speed kind of spoils a guy ;)
Too many irons in the fire

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2017 on: September 08, 2012, 10:36:49 am »
It ain't easy...

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2018 on: September 08, 2012, 10:42:08 am »
Got a little ahead of myself and clicked post before I typed a description. That pic above is after a decent afternoon of skidding. Gave the machine a workout, is was a 20 min skid one way out of a hollow so real hard to be productive but the size and quality of the timber makes it worthwhile.
It ain't easy...

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #2019 on: September 08, 2012, 10:57:10 am »
Heres a few more from that job:

Pretty nice stick. thats a 660 with 24in bar for reference. I try to peel the root flares off, makes it a lot easier to debark and saw without all that extra wood on it.
 
The ground is pretty steep but pics dont do it justice. I laid this one across the hill to keep it from splitting at the crotch and it took a pretty good run down the hill in the process.
 
Thats the first 'bench' where I can still turn the skidder around, much above that and its not worth the risk. The job is pretty tough, the timber lays above the road but not all the way to the top so there are no roads to go up and then come down over.

End up going to get a lot of it with this, the sawmills 550G. I was never a big dowzer fan, but i am coming around. Pretty amazing what you can do as your skill and confidence builds.
 
Pretty tall stuff to, I laid this one up the hill and turned around to take a pic where I topped it.
It ain't easy...