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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881102 times)

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Offline quietrangr

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1940 on: August 21, 2011, 10:37:55 am »
 




1952 Model Feller



1952 Model Buncher



1952 Model Feller Operating 1980 Iron Mule 5000F with Hood 418 Loader

 



Pretty Green Foliage Crushed by 1952 Model Feller's Felling

 



 



Hickory and White Ash Piled by 1952 Model Feller/Buncher

Offline treefarmer87

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1941 on: August 21, 2011, 02:00:31 pm »
nice pics, beautiful woodlot too :)
1990 Ford F-800
1974 Ford L 9000 Self Loader
1994 John Deere 648E
1985 Franklin 170 Forwarder
John Deere 440 B
1980 Treefarmer C6D grapple
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FEC 1000 slasher
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Offline lumberjack48

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1942 on: August 22, 2011, 12:34:57 pm »
Looks like the Ole strip cutting days, i cut and piled many thou's of cords back in the 60's. We had a Hill Lake dray behind a 03 Oliver cat. This is where you need a good pick Axe for piling it up, i could cut and pile 10 cords a day in Aspen when i was 16 yrs old.

I didn't think there were any Lumberjacks left, quietrangr you sure qualify as one.

Back in the 60's and 70's the the Feds payed us to disk-up and plant Clover on all our landing sites.
Third generation logger, owner operator, 30 yrs felling experience with pole skidder. I got my neck broke back in 89, left me a quad. The wife kept the job going up to 96.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1943 on: August 28, 2011, 04:38:39 pm »
Aspen Regeneration. Quick aspen regeneration within 1 month of the aspen timber harvest. Holcomb/Allen timber harvest, 6/11.




~Ron

Offline treefarmer87

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1944 on: August 28, 2011, 07:39:05 pm »
It grows quick!
1990 Ford F-800
1974 Ford L 9000 Self Loader
1994 John Deere 648E
1985 Franklin 170 Forwarder
John Deere 440 B
1980 Treefarmer C6D grapple
Prentice 210
FEC 1000 slasher
FEC 1550 slasher
Danzco Delimber
Sthil 660
Jonsered 2172
Jonsered 2255

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1945 on: August 28, 2011, 07:59:43 pm »
Large tooth (big tooth) is the fastest growing commercial tree up north here. They look like quaking aspen in the photo, but they grow real fast to. I think in Michigan I read that aspen grows most per acre a year than any tree (native to Michigan).

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1946 on: September 12, 2011, 08:19:48 pm »
Wood hauler on its way to the mill, 6/11.



Wood hauler makes the turn onto the mill's route, 6/11.


~Ron

Offline isawlogs

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1947 on: September 12, 2011, 08:37:01 pm »

 Not a bad looking load of logs at all !!!  :)  Man that rig has a lot of tires to deal with  :-\
A man does not always grow wise as he grows old , but he always grows old as he grows wise .

   Marcel

Offline PAFaller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1948 on: September 12, 2011, 09:34:21 pm »
How many bd feet is legal to haul? And how much do they usually haul? I can't imagine log haulers there are any different than log haulers here, hence the two part question ;)
It ain't easy...

Offline woodtroll

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1949 on: September 12, 2011, 10:39:06 pm »
How many bdft/ton?
The age old question.
But how much weight can you haul with all the axles?

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1950 on: September 12, 2011, 11:30:37 pm »
I have often thought that a multi-axle truck from Wisconsin in western SD would allow some major weight to be hauled, but in the same way alot of your net would be lost due to the weight of the extra axles so it prolly wouldn't pan out very well.

Offline chevytaHOE5674

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1951 on: September 13, 2011, 08:31:52 am »
In Michigan an 11 axle truck is legal to 164,000lbs. That works out to about 20-22 cord and 8500-9000 bdft of logs in my experience. That will change a little if they are all random length logs or all 8 footers.

I've bought as much as 11,000 feet of logs off one truck, and stick scaled 24 cord off a truck. Both trucks didn't have loaders on them so it allows them a little more room for wood.

A Wisconsin truck is good for 1/2 the weight of a Michigan truck. When we load trucks that are destined for Wi they get about 9 cord of wood or 4000bdft. If basswood we put 5000 bdft on, if red oak or yellow birch we put 3700 or so on.

Offline Ianab

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1952 on: September 13, 2011, 08:52:36 am »
They look to be stacked a lot higher than the local trucks are allowed.

May be to do with our roads of course.

They changed the regulations and now have a longer trailer with 2 sets of bunks / logs and one set on the truck. All up weight is the same, but the load is longer and lower. Safer on the winding roads.

Ian
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Offline wwsjr

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1953 on: September 13, 2011, 09:53:35 am »
Mississippi allows loggers with forest permit to 84,000 lbs, otherwise 80,000. Typical load is 26 to 28 ton of wood. I use 7 - 8 ton per 1000BF as a estimated yield of SYP or cypress. I have never seen a pup trailer or self-loader in my area, all are 18-wheeler type. SYP Chip-n-saw, SYP and hardwood pulp is hauled tree length and saw logs are usually 12' and 16'. All are loaded on landing with knuckleboom loader.
Retired US Army, Full Time Sawyer since 2001. 2013 LT40HD Super with 25HP 3 Phase, Command Control with Accuset2. ED26 WM Edger, Ford 3930 w/FEL, Prentice Log Loader. Stihl 311, 170 & Logrite Canthooks. WM Million BF Club Member.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1954 on: September 13, 2011, 04:58:31 pm »
I've seen a lot of the numbers when working at a marketing board, you get all the scale slips whether it's weight or stick scaled. The average load of 8' hardwood was 34 metric tonnes. That's with a self loader on the trailer, which was very common up until few years ago. In the spring before restriction on weight, I've seen as much as 44 metric tonnes on a scale slip with no loader. A metric tonne is 200 lb heavier than an American ton. We used 2.5 green metric tonnes per cord based on a cunit of solid wood (100 ft3, 56 lb/ft3 hard maple, beech, yellow birch). I know the 2.5 conversion is close because I've bought stove wood that way and it measured out very close. I have a spot in the basement that holds exactly 6 cords, and I can get 2 more cords along another wall and around the corners with adjoining walls. But I only put 7.5 down.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Taylortractornut

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1955 on: September 13, 2011, 11:11:46 pm »
Wwsjr     you mentioning   not seeing any  self loaders  in MS.        Theres a DM  Mack running around Belmont with a self  loader set up.       You  may know him  Andy Barnett.    He  used the have a white Rmodel   Mack with a bunk on the back later  set up as a trailer.   
My overload permit starts after sunset

Offline chevytaHOE5674

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1956 on: September 14, 2011, 08:27:41 am »
In Michigan its sort of uncommon to see a log truck without a loader on it. I only know of a few trucks without loaders, and most of them have a sister truck with a loader so that one truck can load two. Around here you would be hard pressed to find many loggers that would even load your truck for you.

Offline wwsjr

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1957 on: September 14, 2011, 04:46:16 pm »
There are a few contract haulers around my area, but most trucks and trailers are owned and operated by the loggers themself or a spin-off company owned by the logger. A couple of the loggers I know use two loaders on the landing and if bad road conditions use an old pull-out truck. Drop trailers, hook up to road truck. They operate similar to Bobby Goodson on "Swamp Loggers"
Retired US Army, Full Time Sawyer since 2001. 2013 LT40HD Super with 25HP 3 Phase, Command Control with Accuset2. ED26 WM Edger, Ford 3930 w/FEL, Prentice Log Loader. Stihl 311, 170 & Logrite Canthooks. WM Million BF Club Member.

Offline WDH

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1958 on: September 14, 2011, 08:37:11 pm »
The self loader on a truck fits a system where wood is brought to roadside and stacked.  Then, at a later time, the self loading trucks come and get the wood.  This is a common system where the wood can be stored on the roadside without degrade.

In the Southern US, 99% of the logging is "hot logging".  The wood is processed on logging decks and loaded directly on trucks.  Wood stored on the roadside would not keep with the heat and humidity.  There is more than one way to skin a cat, but sometimes environmental conditions have a say.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1959 on: September 15, 2011, 04:33:59 am »
I think one of the reasons there is no self loaders on public lands is wood theft. Real easy to go out on a weekend to pick over someone's piles for firewood or logs and not a soul around. Also poachers of figured maple.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry