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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881041 times)

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Offline paul case

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1760 on: January 01, 2011, 11:45:19 am »
paul, how are your standards attached to your flatbed?
just bolted down thru the 1/8'' steel floor with 2- 1/2'' bolts each bunk.those bunks are 4'' tube uprights sandwiched at the bottom by 2 pieces of 3/8''x4x4 angle iron. they would almost stand alone. i always bind loads of logs all the way to the truck frame. i made the bunks this way so i could drop them off and use the truck to pull a gooseneck trailer. i thought i might have trouble with the bolt holes ripping out but i have hauled logs on that truck that way for 10 years or more and no troubles. the average load of 10' logs on my truck scales out about 500 to 600 ft. pc
life is too short to be too serious. (some idiot)
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sawing oak.hickory,ERC,walnut and almost anything else that shows up.
Don't get phylosophical with me. you will loose me for sure.
pc

Offline timberfaller390

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1761 on: January 01, 2011, 10:04:03 pm »
I have basically the same setup. My bunks look like yours but fit down in the stake pockets.
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Offline mad murdock

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1762 on: January 01, 2011, 11:29:33 pm »
Thanks Ron for posting the pics of the Amish boys skidding with the team.  Do they fell and buck the timber as well?  Do they do that with axe and misery whip? or do they use mechanized help (chainsaw)?  When I was 13, I worked with a logger who skidded with a horse, myabe I mused on that in another post.  That horse could drag out about 6 cord of wood a day, working him for 6 hours or so, giving him breaks every 1-1/2 to 2 hours.  Good hayburners are a real asset in the woods. 
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Offline northwoods1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1763 on: January 02, 2011, 08:16:09 am »
Thanks Ron for posting the pics of the Amish boys skidding with the team.  Do they fell and buck the timber as well?  Do they do that with axe and misery whip? or do they use mechanized help (chainsaw)?  When I was 13, I worked with a logger who skidded with a horse, myabe I mused on that in another post.  That horse could drag out about 6 cord of wood a day, working him for 6 hours or so, giving him breaks every 1-1/2 to 2 hours.  Good hayburners are a real asset in the woods. 

I'd like to see more pics of anyone logging with horses I find that really interesting. There are a few people still doing it around these parts. Down the road from me just a little ways the U.S. forest service had a black of jackpine they wanted clear cut. But the understory was beautiful hardwood, mostly all oak. I don't know why that stuff comes up so good under jackpine must be the right amount of shade. But they specified it had to be horse logged to save the understory and  did they ever do a nice job. That is the only time I have ever heard of a federal job requiring horse logging but it was the perfect thing in that situation :)

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1764 on: January 02, 2011, 04:08:40 pm »
The Amish horse loggers delimb the tree and then horse skid it tree length to the landing where they buck it up with a chainsaw. They then sort and deck the sawlogs and pulpwood on the landing with a their skid steer. They use mechanized equipment for work but personal travel is by horse unless thy can hitch a vehicle ride with someone, which they are good at. :D

They also want to get back to mechanized skidding and forwarding again as they are complaining that the horse skidding is too slow. ;) I don't mind though as long as they do good work.

The Amish are using the 576 XP Husky chainsaw on this job.

 

~Ron

Offline donny hochstetler

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1765 on: January 02, 2011, 05:28:12 pm »
is it common practice for that area, to snake logs out with cable skidders ,or is the prefered method forwarders, I always thought a small skidder, with a good operator would be the best ,{other than horses}  I also realise that the cable skidder, is only as good as its operator, I have been watching some U tube clips, of skidder operators its amazing some of these people call themselves operators   :o

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1766 on: January 03, 2011, 03:06:30 pm »
Most of our selective hardwood thinnings are done with small forwarders with a cable skidder allowed to pull tree lengths off hill sides and from wet areas where the forwarders can't access. These are cut to length jobs where the product is cut at the stump.

Cable and grapple skidders are allowed on clear cut jobs and pine row thinnings with selection between rows. It all depends upon the objectives of the harvest and the operating plan what tree removal method is allowed is permitted.

"Poor operators" are not allowed to continue working on any job, they are soon replaced. ;)
~Ron

Offline donny hochstetler

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1767 on: January 03, 2011, 08:02:24 pm »
thanks ron , around here it is very hilly .to downright rough,  all cable skidding there are people that can"t even stand to watch us work,    :o        goodday

Offline NB sawdust

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1768 on: January 03, 2011, 10:28:49 pm »
Thought I would post a few pics of what we have been up to around here .This is some of the equipment at work . Two man operation ,myself and the owner .We geared up the patu harvester on a 161 kubota excavator, and I must say it is a great rig! Small but mighty....beats a power saw for production in medium to small timber... and it's warm in there!!!Harvested this nice stand of spruce in the pics below... dropped every tree and ctl with no issue at all. The forwarder is/was a c4 can car/tree farmer that has been converted to a single bunk forwarder.More to come later......














Online Dave Shepard

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1769 on: January 03, 2011, 11:06:17 pm »
Very nice! I'm a big fan of the Kubota compact excavators. 8)
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1770 on: January 04, 2011, 12:49:03 pm »
I just sold a job yesterday of mixed aspen, hardwoods, and pine which has the objectives to improve the area for deer and grouse. This a selective harvest of the hardwoods and pine with total removal of the aspen which covers a good part of the area.

This job will be a highly mechanized job allowing tree length skidding with grapples, hot saw felling, slasher, chipping, etc.

I'll post some photos of activities in a few weeks once the job gets going.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1771 on: January 07, 2011, 05:35:34 pm »
Amish Cutter looks over the situation before falling the marked red oak tree. Schirmer hardwood thinning, 11/10.
 



He's taken his escape route and watches as the tree falls.
 

~Ron

Offline Bobus2003

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1772 on: January 07, 2011, 09:46:59 pm »
Thought I would post a few pics of what we have been up to around here .This is some of the equipment at work . Two man operation ,myself and the owner .We geared up the patu harvester on a 161 kubota excavator, and I must say it is a great rig! Small but mighty....beats a power saw for production in medium to small timber... and it's warm in there!!!Harvested this nice stand of spruce in the pics below... dropped every tree and ctl with no issue at all. The forwarder is/was a c4 can car/tree farmer that has been converted to a single bunk forwarder.More to come later......

Couldn't agree more on the Patu head on a small machine.. I love my Patu 410SH on my 1600 Link Belt

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1773 on: January 16, 2011, 03:35:54 pm »
Aspen Pulpwood. Awaiting pick up by the Iron Mule forwarder. Schirmer hardwood sale, 11/10.
 



~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1774 on: January 17, 2011, 09:00:13 pm »
The aspen pulpwood is picked up by the Iron Mule forwarder for transport to the landing. Schirmer hardwood sale, 11/10.
 

~Ron

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1775 on: January 22, 2011, 06:35:41 pm »
The Western Star Woodhauler arrives at the landing to take out a load of aspen pulpwood. Only a single lead is used with no pup due to the long and difficult access road with steep hills to climb in and out of the timber harvest area. Schirmer hardwood sale, 11/10.



 

~Ron

Offline northwoods1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1776 on: January 23, 2011, 09:38:12 am »
The aspen pulpwood is picked up by the Iron Mule forwarder for transport to the landing. Schirmer hardwood sale, 11/10.
 

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)


That sure looks like a nice woodlot. So much regeneration in there. Really looks like it has been well managed.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1777 on: January 23, 2011, 09:58:41 am »
It's a very nice property, 585 acres with 3 private lakes and a landowner's cabin. We have been working the entire area. Proper timber management has greatly improved it and the landowner is well pleased.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1778 on: January 27, 2011, 08:45:37 pm »
The Western Star leaves the landing with a load of aspen pulpwood, Schirmer hardwood sale, 11/10.

 




~Ron

Offline Maine372

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1779 on: January 27, 2011, 09:16:00 pm »
Jan 2009
 





2004 John Deere 990 with 430 loader and 351 farmi winch. my father and i were working together. mostly he would cut and i would skid. the skidding was the slow step of the operation and i could move the tractor faster and make it pull more. i was probly a little harder on it, but i just used it to its potential, didnt thrash on it.

typically we would punch a road the the back of a woodlot and work towards the front. that way we were falling trees into the open and didnt have to run over the brush. important when you have ag tires and no belly pan. i did once have to replace the fan cause a stick got in the engine compartment. plastic fans dont make good chippers, FYI.