The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880876 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Okrafarmer

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6417
  • Age: 39
  • Location: upcountry SC-- Sweetgum capital of the world!
  • Gender: Male
  • Avast! Here appeareth some sweetgummery about....
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1700 on: October 28, 2010, 12:24:19 am »
I'm slowly working my way through this thread-- about 10 pages a night. Wow.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Turbosawmill 8" cut GX390 Warrior Sawmill, 13hp Honda
MS290 Stihl

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline Bobus2003

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 875
  • Age: 32
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1701 on: October 31, 2010, 01:46:56 pm »
Timberline 3800 Boom Delimber w/leveling Cab Working Ponderosa Pine, Black Hills SD

Offline northwoods1

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 813
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1702 on: November 01, 2010, 07:51:49 am »
:o We wouldn't be allowed in the bush in those conditions.
That looks normal for Maine. The land heals itself. These are the conditions skidders are built for. If they didn't have to contend with these conditions, they would look a lot tamer.

How forestry equipment is designed and built and what conditions it can operate under, and managing/harvesting timber land in a sustainable manner are two different things. Just because a skidder can drive through wet ground up to the axles making ruts 2' deep with #20,000 of wood on its back is no excuse or justification for doing it. Acceptable damage standards on logging jobs varies everywhere.  Up here loggers have to operate under guidlines... BMPs, or best management practices in order to have contracts with many mills. Loggers are required to have training on the hows and whys of BMPs'. True enough the land heals itself but that is still not justification for damaging it unnecessarily. That is why we have people who are foresters who determine the best way to prevent damage to land/timber and promote things like management of timber, protecting watersheds, improving land for recreation or wildlife habitat. How they go about harvesting the swamps of the southern U.S. really can't be compared to how forests are managed in other parts of the country.

Offline northwoods1

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 813
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1703 on: November 01, 2010, 07:54:26 am »
heres the cutter

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)


What the ?????? , do you have any info on these pics like who, what where, when? I've never seen or heard anything about a machine like you showing and the pics look like there taken somewhere right up by me, I wonder what year?

Offline northwoods1

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 813
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1704 on: November 01, 2010, 09:06:46 am »
You're absolutely right. It's all about what's acceptable for the given circumstances. The free market means that if there is a demand for lighter impact  logging, it will be supplied by the loggers.

No not really that is not what I was saying. What constitutes sustainable forestry managment practices has nothing to do with the free market or what loggers or landowners want. If a landowner wants to ruin there land through unwise timber harvesting method, maybe to make a buck,  that does not make it acceptable or sustainable forestry. The entire challenge of sustainable forestry practices, the way I see it, is to figure out how to be able to incorporate them and still be able to make $$ in the free market not the other way around :)

Offline northwoods1

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 813
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1705 on: November 01, 2010, 09:14:21 am »
its in michigan in the 60s try this http://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?t=12720



I find that to be some very interesting equipment :) , this was such an innovative time up here in the forest products industry people were just beginning to figure out the potential of mechanization. My neighbor has sitting in his shed the very 1st Timbco ever made and that was right around the time Case was experimenting with a shear head on a tracked excavator. I really can't believe how far it has come since then, that 1st timbco spawned todays timber pro machines. I can remember when they first got that machine up and running and cutting on some of there large sales here, they really thought they were on to something  :o and they were!

Offline northwoods1

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 813
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1706 on: November 01, 2010, 10:19:24 am »
I know of one guy that guy fined for cutting in a brook like that back in the 80's.I remember reading about it in the paper.Still see some butcher jobs around,or at least in my eyes.I've been told before that I'm to fussy with my woodlot.  ::) Most jobs are very well done.Even back in the 80's and 90's too.There are still are few around that will holler,"Well you got to get the wood out" A nice,neat job can be done without destroying the land the tress grow on.Just takes more time to do it.And of course time is money.

I saw a very sad situation this past summer. Long time friend of mine called me and said he was having 40 acres of timber land logged which was located up near Florence WI. He is an absentee landowner and lives 300 or so miles away. He got a forester from up in the U.P. to set up and administrate the job. He called me because he was concerned about the cords coming up short it had been estimated at 1300 cords total aspen. When I got out to the job I couldn't beleive what I saw. =To access the  timber the logger had tried to cross a black ash swamp by laying down timber mats for 150 yards, (totally unnecessary he could have went around this swamp if he would have walked the job and looked for the path of least resistance)  The mats were all floating there and they had things royally screwed up. The job should have been a winter only job and they came in and started april of the wettest year on record here. They had things so rutted up I have never seen anything like it before in all my years of logging. To top it off they had all the timber cut, the wettest area skidded and totally rutted, trails up hills with springs running out of the ground right down 2' deep ruts, and a small creek only 150 yards away the whole 40 acres wide running in to a large creek just off the propery line. All the soil was washing off the hills down in to the creek. And they ended up pulling out because it was too wet and leaving 70% of the wood to be skidded all of it cut.  I got on the phone with the forester and I found that he hadn't even been out to the job since marking the property lines even though he had told my friend he had been and was monitoring things. My friend had not received any money down, which the contract stated he would have, and that they would not haul anything from the job without it being payed for, which they had done. I simply told him things better be corrected and in a hurry. The contract had only a $1000 performance bond which wouldn't nearly cover repair of the damage they had done or how much they devalued the land. My friend is still working things out on that job. I take a lot of pride in doing a nice neat job. Staying out of the mud and not doing that kind of damage is a matter of sheduling jobs correctly for conditions.

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1707 on: November 06, 2010, 02:35:45 pm »
Ponsee Fox Harvester. Harvesting lowland timber species in a Michigan lowland area.The Ponsee Fox Harvester has a good lighting system for working in low light or night time operations. These machines are often worked 20 hours per day with only 4 hours down time for maintenance. Grayling. MI 11/10

 





~Ron

Offline barbender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5100
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Deer River MN
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1708 on: November 07, 2010, 03:09:08 am »
That's one of the few Ponsse Fox's in the states there Ron, isn't it? Ponsse just had one up here demoing it.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Corley5

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7570
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wolverine, Michigan USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Wolverine, Michigan
    • Whittaker Farms
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1709 on: November 07, 2010, 09:18:43 am »
Ya gotta have lots of lights and run those Ponsee's 20 hours a day just to make the payments on them :-\
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1710 on: November 07, 2010, 09:59:56 am »
This actually was a Ponsee demonstration. Ponsee bought the lowland timber sale so as to have their own demonstration area and operator/service training for their machines. They were giving this demonstration at a Michigan SAF meeting.

The machine with tracks works very well in lowland areas. Yes, at a "1/2 million $ purchase price", they have to run constantly. There was a logger coming to look at it for possible purchase however. Ponsee's are starting to get popular here over some of the other historical brands.
~Ron

Offline Okrafarmer

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6417
  • Age: 39
  • Location: upcountry SC-- Sweetgum capital of the world!
  • Gender: Male
  • Avast! Here appeareth some sweetgummery about....
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1711 on: November 07, 2010, 02:39:26 pm »
Ya gotta have lots of lights and run those Ponsee's 20 hours a day just to make the payments on them :-\

I think I'll pass for now, my mama warned me not to get caught up in any ponsee schemes.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Turbosawmill 8" cut GX390 Warrior Sawmill, 13hp Honda
MS290 Stihl

Genesis Hardwood Lumber

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1712 on: November 08, 2010, 07:25:47 pm »
Ponsee Fox Harvester. Harvesting spruce pulpwood in a lowland area, Grayling, MI 11/10. It is powered by a quiet Mercedes Benz 4 cylinder engine.





~Ron

Offline treefarmer87

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1714
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Buckingham Virginia
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1713 on: November 08, 2010, 07:29:17 pm »
thats $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ high dollar
1990 Ford F-800
1974 Ford L 9000 Self Loader
1994 John Deere 648E
1985 Franklin 170 Forwarder
John Deere 440 B
1980 Treefarmer C6D grapple
Prentice 210
FEC 1000 slasher
FEC 1550 slasher
Danzco Delimber
Sthil 660
Jonsered 2172
Jonsered 2255

Offline Corley5

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7570
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wolverine, Michigan USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Wolverine, Michigan
    • Whittaker Farms
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1714 on: November 08, 2010, 07:37:40 pm »
Wonder how it'd perform/hold up in gnarly, knotty northern hardwood  ??? :-\ :)
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline snowstorm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3473
  • Location: maine
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1715 on: November 08, 2010, 07:45:31 pm »
i have a 150 keto on a valmet. you be surprised at the hardwood it will limb. a 3"  limb dosent even slow it down...4" back up an hit it a couple times

Offline treefarmer87

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1714
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Buckingham Virginia
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1716 on: November 08, 2010, 07:55:02 pm »
do the processors break down much?
1990 Ford F-800
1974 Ford L 9000 Self Loader
1994 John Deere 648E
1985 Franklin 170 Forwarder
John Deere 440 B
1980 Treefarmer C6D grapple
Prentice 210
FEC 1000 slasher
FEC 1550 slasher
Danzco Delimber
Sthil 660
Jonsered 2172
Jonsered 2255

Offline snowstorm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3473
  • Location: maine
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1717 on: November 08, 2010, 08:10:16 pm »
its been pretty good. did buy a reman computer for it. 2500 bucks and it comes with a dent in the screen screws missing and the battery is flat. but it dose work fine for 2 months then throws code short cirkit-cable bk. call the dis. in quebec says he will look into it . that was in june....2 weeks ago i hear from him "the display is fine must be somethind else"..........anybody on here ever deal with quadco???

Offline chevytaHOE5674

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 2790
  • Location: Ontonagon Mi
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1718 on: November 08, 2010, 09:05:29 pm »
do the processors break down much?

I know many guys UP here break the feed wheels often trying to ram large hardwoods through to delimb them. Often times in the process they chew the logs up (which can knock them down in scale and grade) and where the limbs are sheared off it can cause fiber pull and such .

Offline Bobus2003

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 875
  • Age: 32
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1719 on: November 08, 2010, 09:16:35 pm »
do the processors break down much?

My Patu 410 Has tendancy to Shake the Processor Board loose after 30-40hrs or limbing (Stroke) so it has a bit of abuse thrown at it..