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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881124 times)

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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1660 on: August 04, 2010, 01:17:48 pm »
John Deere 440B Cable Skidder. This small skidder is used to pull tree lengths from steep hill sides and wet areas not accessable by the iron mule forwarder in the short wood harvest operation. Schirmer hardwood sale, 3/10.


~Ron

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1661 on: August 04, 2010, 02:42:37 pm »
Ow Ron, that was a shock. I wasn't ready for that picture with the white stuff in August and I'll probably see to much of that this winter as I have a lot of jobs to finish by spring.

Don't even want to think about it now.  :) :)
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1662 on: August 04, 2010, 02:56:07 pm »
With the heat and high humidity here lately, the "white stuff" looks good. At least for the wood's work.  ;)
~Ron

Offline Corley5

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1663 on: August 04, 2010, 07:55:29 pm »
Bring on the frosty mornings :) :)
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1664 on: August 05, 2010, 11:26:33 pm »
You can have my share.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1665 on: August 22, 2010, 02:06:27 pm »
New Product. A local Amish sawmill is now cutting red pine into these cants which are sold to a buyer to be cut into fencing slats.



~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1666 on: September 09, 2010, 03:55:50 pm »
Cedar Stumps. The Amish are very good in wood utilization. These cedar stumps will be used for table basis in there table making shop at their sawmill.

 

~Ron

Offline Norm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1667 on: September 10, 2010, 07:50:59 am »
Those are cool Ron, do you know how they get them so clean? Pressure washer maybe?

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1668 on: September 10, 2010, 10:53:28 am »
Yes, they pressure wash them.
~Ron

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1669 on: September 19, 2010, 10:09:25 pm »
The Pettibone 501 Master Mountain Goat Speed Skidder, what a name, eh? Picked it up last winter.

Too many irons in the fire

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1670 on: October 20, 2010, 08:32:36 pm »
Western Star Wood Hauler. Loading out pulpwood on the single lead only. The "pup trailer" is not being used due the long, sandy, and hilly seasonal access road. Schirmer hardwood sale, 10/10.





~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1671 on: October 21, 2010, 07:53:29 pm »
1270D Timberjack Harvester. Harvesting Red Pine in the Manistee National Forest, 9/10





~Ron

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1672 on: October 21, 2010, 08:25:16 pm »
That looks like a nice job compared to the ones I get here in MN. This is what I get.
 



How was your job set up? Row thin, logger select to some DBH, or marked sale? Got any more?  :D
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1673 on: October 21, 2010, 08:41:59 pm »
Row thinned every 3rd row and selectively marked in between rows to 90-120 sq. ft basal area. This stand was in a real need of thinning. Yes, the Huron-Manistee NF's have a lot of red pine stands like this in need of their first and second thinnings. The Superior and Chippewa NF's in your area should have similar stands. Many are from the successful reforestation efforts of the CCC's. 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1674 on: October 22, 2010, 01:30:03 pm »
1010D John Deere Forwarder. The 1010D forwarder supports the 1270D Timberjack processor. Manistee NF red pine harvest, 9/10.





~Ron

Offline Norm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1675 on: October 23, 2010, 06:52:55 am »
Thank you for the pictures Ron.  :)

Offline LOGDOG

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1676 on: October 23, 2010, 09:33:52 am »
Talk about some beautiful pine forests.  :)

Offline northwoods1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1677 on: October 24, 2010, 07:12:12 am »
That pile of wood in the last pic has got to be the smallest diameter pile of pine I have ever seen, is that pulp? Looks like its all 3" dia/ or less :o can't kick about utilization of that job, looks like it really did need thinning normal 1st thinning is every other row but that stand couldn't have taken it.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1678 on: October 24, 2010, 10:43:43 am »
Yes, we try for maximum utilization depending upon markets. The small topwood will go for pulpwood or sold to the Amish for fence posts and specialty products. I suspect that is where their market is for these wood decks.

The stand was in dier need of thinning and the USFS finally got to it. We usually don't do every every other row here, usually every 3rd row with selection removal between rows. Sometimes we will do two rows and leave too rows. We are concerned about preventing wind throw, retaining moisture content within the stand, moving the stand towards quality poles in the second thinning, etc.
~Ron

Offline northwoods1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1679 on: October 24, 2010, 12:46:54 pm »
That is great if they are able to utilize that small stuff for posts i've never heard of that. All the first thinnings I have ever done in my area have been every other row, 2nd thinnings approx. every other tree all geared toward producing poles. The plantations around here are a lot more mature on the average most were planted by the ccc's and there is a lot of it. The picture  I show of the standing wood is just down the road from my house a couple miles I thinned it about 10 years ago and it was 3rd thinning there was some very nice poles. Back in the early 90s' a big mill opened up in northern wi for tree length wood and we thinned a lot of these stands for the 2nd time shipping it tree length. We lost a big chunk of it in a windstorm june of 2007 that is the other picture I show, just down the road from my home. The f-5 tornado went right through the middle of two very expansive areas of this mature pole timber with a path 1 mile wide+. After all the years of watching this be carefully nurtured and managed now I get to see the whole process start over, they haven't begun planting yet but most sites have been cleaned up and prepped for planting everything that was planted anyway.