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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881125 times)

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Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #160 on: June 11, 2002, 08:16:52 pm »
Thats a nice looking stand.Are there many markets for the logs,finger joint,etc? The  Forest service in our district,are starting to put up similar,D-Fir,Western Hemlock timber sales.
eg  tregar  meste  på  Tulla, for  ho  var  krulla  i  ulla.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #161 on: June 12, 2002, 11:08:34 am »
Roadside Loading Red Pine. Yes, there are good markets for red pine in this area. Depending upon size, it is marketed for utility poles, cabin logs, sawlogs, saw bolts, landscape timbers, fence posts, pulpwood, etc.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #162 on: June 27, 2002, 06:31:19 pm »
Hydro-Ax 321. The smaller three wheeled unit for light, close work.


~Ron

Offline Bro. Noble

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #163 on: June 28, 2002, 12:20:23 am »
We have considered such an outfit as this or the three wheeled BELL harvestor.  We only log our own timber so wonder if we can justify one.  We have about 400 acres of mixed timber---mostly on steep hillsides and about 100 acres of planted yellow pine.

We see used ones advertised as low as $10,000---$30,000.  What's the chance of getting one in that price range that would be worthwhile for us.  Would we just be begging for trouble?

If you use the shear heads., how much of the butt is damaged?
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #164 on: June 28, 2002, 07:44:57 pm »
I wouldn't use this unit on steep hill sides. It works best on flat terrain. A shear head may damage a foot or so of the butt depending upon the operator, shear maintenance, and tree species.

They are "pricey". Check the maintenane records and demo it when buying a used one. There are some good buys if one shops around a bit.

I believe this unit is for sale. It is located up in Michigan's western Upper Peninsula at Iron River, MI.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #165 on: June 28, 2002, 08:18:46 pm »
On the Road. "Highballing" on the  US 27 freeway with pine pulpwood load for the mill.


~Ron

Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #166 on: June 28, 2002, 08:26:04 pm »
How are the trucks unloaded? It looks like both trucks have a space between front and back.
eg  tregar  meste  på  Tulla, for  ho  var  krulla  i  ulla.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #167 on: June 29, 2002, 07:27:21 am »
Truck Loader/Unloader. Located at rear of most semi's main bed. Center position allows loading/unloading of truck and its "pup".


~Ron

Offline Steve

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #168 on: June 29, 2002, 08:01:20 am »
How long does it take to unload a truck and pup trailer like that?
Steve
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #169 on: July 01, 2002, 08:29:44 am »
Loading Time for truck and "pup" for the average operator is about 1 hour.

Unloading Time at the mill is about 20 minutes.

Mill will often unload you with its yard unloading equipment, but if there is a line-up of semis to be unloaded, they will let you go ahead and unload yourself. An advantage of such a "rig".

~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #170 on: July 01, 2002, 03:09:45 pm »
On the Road. Drive defensively. Watch for those small vehicles on the "blind" side.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #171 on: July 02, 2002, 09:32:07 am »
Red Pine, 1st Thinning. A 3rd row removal. Short wood operation with chain saw. Slash looped and scattered.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #172 on: July 10, 2002, 07:39:08 pm »
Red Pine, 1st Thinning. The Iron Mule forwarder picks up the harvest wood along the thinned rows and runs over the remaining slash for aethetics and decay back into the soil.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #173 on: July 18, 2002, 07:47:49 pm »
Railroad Transportation. Wood products are also transported by rail. Hardwood pulpwood has been loaded into rail cars at the Gulliver Siding in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #174 on: July 22, 2002, 03:53:05 pm »
Timberjack 380C Grapple Skidder. On lowboy transport; being delivered to hardwood timber sale for road closure work.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #175 on: July 24, 2002, 07:37:31 am »
Timberjack 380C Grapple Skidder. Lifts large oak log to set in place for road closure. Access roads often need to be closed after the timber harvest.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #176 on: July 25, 2002, 12:53:22 pm »
Timberjack 380 Grapple Skidder. Placing the second large oak log for closure of timber harvest access road.


~Ron

Offline Tom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #177 on: July 25, 2002, 03:18:24 pm »
There is a piece of "abandoned" property next door to me where folks have found a place to have pot parties etc.  I put a live oak log as big or bigger than those logs in the picture above,  across the road and it butted from tree to tree on either side.  It was a strain on my 555 backhoe but I got it in place    Ju-u-s-s-s-t right.

The scoundrels moved it that night.  From the tracks they had used a pickup truck. :-/ >:( :D
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #178 on: July 25, 2002, 06:15:00 pm »
Tom,

Road closures are often violated, but one needs to be persistent in maintaining the closure.

This one of oak logs isn't the best, but the landowner lives right across the road and its in a well traveled residential area, so there are many to keep an eye on it.

Oak logs especially aren't good to use, but these were two large hollow cull logs that would have been left on the landing for grouse drumming logs or wildlife dens. Instead we used them for the road closure for a more natural appearance.

If they were good oak sawlogs, they would  soon be "stolen". If they were smaller trees, especially oak trees,  fallen across the road, they would have been soon cut up for firewood and the road again opened.

In the back woods areas we usually build a series of "tank traps" (earthen mounds covering exposed stubby woody debris about 4' high or so). We placed an earthen mound at the ends of the logs here, but not excessive. When excessive, they aren't too aesthetically pleasing.

In some cases a heavy steel gate with concrete filled steel posts is used. This is more permanent.

It depends upon what the landowner wants and if he can keep it maintained. ORV's and snowmobiles are usually the most problem, but then when the violator wants to remove the closure they will use a 4x4 truck with chain, winch, or whatever.



 
~Ron

Offline woodmills1

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #179 on: July 25, 2002, 06:16:47 pm »
Tom, I find if you put a very large rock on both sides of the big log it really is much harder for the scoundrels to move it. ;)
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