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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881114 times)

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Offline tractorg25

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1560 on: July 02, 2009, 12:58:33 pm »
grew up pulp wood / short stick logging. Felled with Poulan straigt bars and bucked with bow bars. skidded with a 1952 D2 Cat with a sled that would hold two cord. Hauled to mill on an old two ton IH truck similar to the one in Tom's picture. Now I have moved up to a D6 Cat and John Deere  wheel tractor for skidding, still fell and buck with chain saws and haul with a 1973 C-65 chevy truck and tandem trailer. 10 to 16 ft saw logs and ceder fence post is all I cut now.
Clint Goodson

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1561 on: July 05, 2009, 07:15:17 pm »
Trelan 5600-L Chipper. Chipping Scotch pine; Schirmer chip harvest; 6/09







~Ron

Offline semologger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1562 on: July 06, 2009, 09:59:51 pm »
Welcome aboard tractorg25.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1563 on: July 22, 2009, 12:20:47 pm »
West Virginia Logging. My return to Richwood West Virginia after 31 years found logging to be quite active now in the Richwood area. While I was their during the early 1970's the Monongahela N.F. was under court injunction prohibiting clearcutting.

Here a log tuck travels down the main street of Richwood, West Virginia, the Gateway to the Monongahela National Forest, 6/09. I never saw this happen during my 4 years there. Only coal trucks .

 



Another log truck makes a turn from Oakford Avenue on to Main Stree in Richwood, W. Va., 6/09.

 

~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1564 on: July 30, 2009, 07:47:26 pm »
Columbia Mill Road Sign; Craigsville, W VA; 6/09

 



A wood hauler prepares to make a turn into the large Columbia hardwood plywood mill in Craigsville, W Va; 6/09.



~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1565 on: July 31, 2009, 02:42:37 am »
Ron,

Is that a sawmill or veneer plant? As you probably know, they are the largest veneer manufacturer in the country I believe. They have a plant up in Presque Isle, Maine and send a buyer around the Maritimes and Quebec for veneer to scale. I know one fellow that works there and a former scaler as well. The fellow that works there now has worked under me at the Marketing Board.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1566 on: July 31, 2009, 10:55:19 am »
It's quite a mill complex producing a number of wood products including hardwood plywood and fiber board. The Jeld-Wen Wood Fiber division is also located there in the Nicholas County Wood Products Park. It's the most wood producing activity that I've seen in awhile.
~Ron

Offline GregW

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1567 on: July 31, 2009, 04:37:47 pm »
Here's some old iron...





1974 International S8 "Paylogger". Weight is about 20k. 3-53 Detroit, 23.1x26 tires, Gearmatic 119 winch. I bought this about 15 yrs ago. Used it full-time logging until 3 yrs ago. I now only log part-time, mostly in the winter months. This has been a good skidder and has used me well.

 



 



I use it sometimes to load big logs on my sawmill ...

 



IH quit making skidders in the early 80's I think. I have used JD's, Timberjacks, Tree Farmers and Franklins. I like this IH the most of all.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1568 on: July 31, 2009, 06:15:10 pm »
Dad had a late 60's Tree Farmer, gas engine. The only thing I seen him replace was the battery. He used to remove it when the machine was sitting idle for a few months. I was going to say he replaced the manifold, but all he did was repair it because I think parts were hard to find at the time. Never sold it until he was ready to sell the farm. Dad used to cut all his own wood on the farm for fuel and for mill sales. There was places far off the fields he never even got to. "Why go way over there? Lots of wood right here."  I tried to convince him to cut some huge aspen at the end, close to the field to, but he was all done farm'n. :D :D :D

There was a small grove of large toothed aspen that grew back since a cut in 1994, and in 2007 those trees were already 8" dbh. Fastest growing native tree I've seen around here, it will out pace trembling by far.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Weekend_Sawyer

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1569 on: August 03, 2009, 09:06:34 pm »

 Saw this harvester sitting out by the road in Southern Maryland along 301. No one was around so I didn't get any information. It says BELL on it. looks like a fun ride.

 



Here's a front view. Looks like George Lucas would like one for his movies  :)

 

Imagine, Me a Tree Farmer.
Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe. ... and it looks like my dream will come true!

Online beenthere

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1570 on: August 03, 2009, 09:10:34 pm »
Weekend_Sawyer
Here is a tube video of one.

south central Wisconsin
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Online beenthere

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1571 on: August 03, 2009, 09:31:37 pm »
And another. This one shows a grapple on a boom.

south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Tripp

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1572 on: August 03, 2009, 09:56:06 pm »
That is one wild vehicle. I like it!

Tripp

Offline wi woodcutter

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1573 on: August 03, 2009, 10:39:19 pm »
That thing looks like it would turn on a dime and give you eight cents in change. :)

It also looks like a accident waiting to happen.
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Offline Don K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1574 on: August 04, 2009, 12:05:19 am »
Excellent piece of equipment for clearing really dense stands of young pines. The first thinning on my dads place was done with a bell three wheeler with a shear head. he could get in some tight spots and didn't tear up a lot of stuff. Frasseling skidder was bigger than he was. They are not real common. Don't seem to work good in the hills (like a Z-turn mower on a sideslope) and a back weight disadvantage for larger trees.

Don
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1575 on: August 04, 2009, 05:17:14 pm »
A 3 wheeled Bell feller buncher was used to salvage the many acres of burned over jack pine after the Mack Lake Fire of May 1980 on the Mio District of the Huron National Forest. It did a good job on the flat burned over areas, but I haven't seen one at work since.
~Ron

Offline Meadows Miller

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1576 on: August 04, 2009, 10:20:23 pm »

 Saw this harvester sitting out by the road in Southern Maryland along 301. No one was around so I didn't get any information. It says BELL on it. looks like a fun ride.

 

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Here's a front view. Looks like George Lucas would like one for his movies  :)

 

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Gday This is a great thred its taken me nearly 12 months to read it  Its a BELL Super T fellerbuncher  ;)Have have been built in africa since the mid 60s and where built in NZ also and under licence buy Morbark in the US untill the mid 90s you can still get new ones from Bell in Africa they where pretty popular here  they come in the Super T ,120 and 220 teli loggers like in the second clip  ;) they are  Easy to drive and a 1000lb counterweight helps on the rear  ;)

Il add some pics of my own and dads from the 80s when i cget them scaned  ;)

Chris
4TH Generation Timbergetter

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1577 on: August 14, 2009, 08:18:21 pm »
Manufacture of Forest Products is active in Craigsville, W VA, 6/09

 



 

~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1578 on: August 20, 2009, 12:42:35 pm »
Colunbia Veneer Mill Log Yard. A result of all the logging truck traffic makes for a full log yard. Craigsville, W VA, 6/09.

 

~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1579 on: August 20, 2009, 04:50:05 pm »
Ron, I'll have to drive up to the Columbia yard in Presque Isle, Maine and see what's up. I was just up by there last weekend to, but not over in the Industrial Park. We could see it from the Route 1A coming down from Caribou, actually I could pick out the airport. The folks and I came over from Perth, NB to shop and went back over the line at Bridgewater by my place (below the wind mills).

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry