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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880783 times)

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1480 on: June 19, 2008, 03:53:04 pm »
Yeah, just rotten luck. When your in panic mode you don't think too clear some times. Sad you lost your friend.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1481 on: June 22, 2008, 05:25:53 pm »
The center mount loaders we use up here don't have any kind of operator protection, just a seat. Slasher loaders that have cabs usually don't contain a ROPS, it's just to keep you out of the cold.  Sorry to hear about your friend, twobears.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline redneck logger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1482 on: August 09, 2008, 02:07:56 pm »
heres whats going to be on my crew



got to love working in the woods

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1483 on: August 09, 2008, 02:55:05 pm »
That's a nice looking tracked harvester. Is that one of those big Valmet heads on that machine?

Do you always use graple skidders rather than forwarders behind your harvesters?
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1484 on: August 09, 2008, 04:03:50 pm »
Grapple skidder is quite commonly used with processors here Gary. I find that a skidder makes for a better catch of new regeneration. Often a processor will tear up advanced regen from a lot of operations I see. And some advanced regen is best torn up if it's 50 year old fir 4 feet tall. If the timing of the harvest is right the fir, spruce, sugar maple and yellow birch will come back thicker than dog hair. ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline redneck logger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1485 on: August 09, 2008, 07:04:07 pm »
sorry thats what i want when im older im only 13
got to love working in the woods

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1486 on: August 10, 2008, 03:54:02 am »
The only jobs here that use a grapple skidder behind a harvester are in steep terain where the danger of rollovers with a forwarder is just too high.

There is just no way to keep up with a harvester without a good forwarder and even then it's difficult. Even a forwarder is seldom used for long distances like over a half mile. When you have to haul farther than that, they usually fix the road up for the semi's and use intermediate landings.

Also on many of the jobs we get now there are multiple species and cut lengths to deal with and hauling small bundles is waay too time consuming and sorting is even worse.
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1487 on: August 10, 2008, 04:27:19 am »
Forwarders are common here now.Seems like if you have 2-3 guys a forwarder is used.When my lot was cut they used a forwarder and a grapple.I had a couple steep area that he wanted to use the skidder.Trees were to big for the havester or he would of used that.There are still some guys that cut alone that only have a skidder.
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Offline Dom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1488 on: August 10, 2008, 04:29:37 pm »
That's a nice looking tracked harvester. Is that one of those big Valmet heads on that machine?

Do you always use graple skidders rather than forwarders behind your harvesters?

The head is a Logmax. I'm assuming a 7000. The harvester looks like a Tigercat 822.
Logmax heads are very productive units.

Offline zackman1801

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1489 on: August 10, 2008, 11:37:13 pm »
Forwarders are common here now.Seems like if you have 2-3 guys a forwarder is used.When my lot was cut they used a forwarder and a grapple.I had a couple steep area that he wanted to use the skidder.Trees were to big for the havester or he would of used that.There are still some guys that cut alone that only have a skidder.
the only really mech logging around my area is for big companies that work directly for paper mills and the sort. mostly they just cut softwood for pulp and chip the tops and small trees. But the most common operations are usually just  guy or 2 and a skidder.
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1490 on: August 11, 2008, 04:33:12 am »
How much do you drive around in ME,Zackman?I'm not talking up north.Just in our area.I see forwarders quite often cutting on small lots.I went with my Grandson's field trip,forwarder,grapple,even a three wheel havester,and chipper.I drove by a lot last year on the way to work and there was a forwarder cutting for a house lot.Was another on the way to my FIL house.I've been seeing them.Maybe they all work for the paper company.The guy that cut for me does a lot for IP or whatever it is now.
I do wonder how some was and can make decent money with all the high cost of equipment.At first I was not all that impressesd with a forwarder.But from what I've seen on other sites and on my lot,I'm very impressesd now.I have quite a hill to get up into my lot.With a skidder the top of the hill would of been at the bottom.The trails are so much better looking.I would like to have one just to haul rocks with.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1491 on: August 11, 2008, 05:38:16 am »
Gary, delimber and slasher on the yard on a few operations. On sites with small hardwood it's all pulp and might be someone bucking logs, but the volumes here are low so the bucker would never really be flooded with wood.  ;) On softwood ground, it would go tree length and probably a delimber on the yard. Talking private woodlots and career loggers, not small operators or weekend loggers. Yarding is usually less than 400 meters. Most private woodlots are between 250-400 meters wide, road up the middle or on the property line. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline timberfaller390

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1492 on: August 11, 2008, 06:30:42 pm »
Everybody down my way uses a buncher followed by a grapple skidder, except us small timers then its chainsaws cable skidders and some kind of loader. I have never seen a forwarder on a job site here.
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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1493 on: August 11, 2008, 09:26:21 pm »
Timberfaller3, I have a friend down there that lives in Juliette. He has a Ponsse Ergo harvester, another fellow has a Ponsse forwarder that works behind him. They are the only Ponsse machines in Georgia, I believe there are some John Deere cut to length operations though. The wood down there is ideal for the cut to length machines, but they aren't very well accepted.
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Offline timberfaller390

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1494 on: August 12, 2008, 10:28:15 am »
Timberfaller3, I have a friend down there that lives in Juliette. He has a Ponsse Ergo harvester, another fellow has a Ponsse forwarder that works behind him. They are the only Ponsse machines in Georgia, I believe there are some John Deere cut to length operations though. The wood down there is ideal for the cut to length machines, but they aren't very well accepted.

Your right about it not being accepted. But then again neither is most standard safety gear. If you find a one or two man operation up here in the hills besides me that uses so much as a hard hat, then you done something worth talking about. In my area there is still a good many 1940-1970 log trucks on the road and alot of home brewed equipment, now that ain't to say that the big companies don't use all the proper safety gear cause most of them do, but it's awful hard for OSHA to come down on one guy with a chainsaw for not wearing chaps especially when Georgia ain't an OSHA state.
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Offline twobears

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1495 on: August 15, 2008, 09:12:16 pm »

 anybody that runs a chainsaw without the proper safety equiptment is a fool! when,that chain cuts into you..you,ll wish you had chaps on..or if a tree hits you on the head you,ll wish you had a hard hat on.
 i always ware safety equipment but,i know just whats it,s like to watch a chainsaw kickback and rip you apart.three years ago this coming tuesday,i got cut by a husky 272.i got cut pretty much from my left wrist to the inside of my elbow.it hit down by my wrist and twisted around my arm.when,it stopped the bar and chain was stuck in my arm and i had blood pouring out of me.i was a good 400 yards back from the landing and by myself.the other skidder op was 700/800 yards behind me and as lucky would have it the truck driver just showed up on the landing.
 i pulled the saw out of my arm,tossed it on the ground and held my arm back together as best as i could.i had blood pouring thur my fingers in streams.i had to jump off the tree i was standing on.once,i got on the ground i leaned over and pushed my arm into my hip to put more pressure on it..i had blood running thur my fingers and down my chaps,it was running off the toe of my boot.i hit the landing and yelled to the truck driver.he looked but didn,t see me so i yelled again.. i,ve worked with him on and off for 20 years..i never seen him move so fast.. :o i also never saw him turn so white.
 it has taken me two and a half years to recover and i,ll have a messedup left hand for the rest of my life.
 now is not wearing the proper safety equipment worth it?? oooo,and don,t depend on that chain brake saving you..mine didn,t.it didn,t go off when the saw first kicked back and it didn,t even fire when the brake handle hit the side of my hand.

 delbert

Offline timberfaller390

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1496 on: August 15, 2008, 09:18:40 pm »
Exactly the reason I have chaps helmets boots gloves and eye/ear protection at all times, and being with the local fire/rescue department I have seen my share of chainsaw mishaps that range from very minor to dead when we got there.
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Offline twobears

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1497 on: August 16, 2008, 08:47:20 pm »

 a logger has to remember where he is.the hospital might be hours away.i,ve taken two trips.the first time i got hit in the face and busted my nose really baddly.we where on paper company land.it took 45 minutes to just get to the gate on town road.then,it took another hour plus to get to the hospital.
 the time i sawed my arm i was just around the corner from my house and working on private land.the land owner keepplaying game on fixing the road into the landing and we could hardly get in and out..even,in a 4x4 pickup truck.things moved pretty fast that day but it still took awhile to reach the hospital.the log truck driver called 911 on his cell phone.i was really surprized he got a good enough signal...he did tho.once,he got the emt's on the way he took his sons pickup truck and drove me out to the town road.the emt's gpt there just a very minutes later.they checked me out and then drove me acrossed my little town to a feild so,a chopper could take me the rest of the way.i ended up in a hospital about 45 minutes away by road.but,it was about two hours from getting cut until i got in the hospital.
 you only have so much blood and once part of it's drained out of you..your done.EVERY!! logger should not only wear chaps,hardhat,ect they also should learn first-aid.i think a person should also learn to deal with seeing blood,ect..alot of people can,t.when,my friend got killed i heard that the skidder op saw him first and he wouldn,t even go check on him.he waited for another guy to get out of the woods and had him check on my friend. thats NOT!! the way to handle a accident.if i had been that way i,de most likely be dead. it surely wasn,t pretty or fun to see that saw cut me apart but,i had to deal with it or die.
 ok,enough of that..go get your chaps,hardhat,check your chain brake and get some first-aid training then be careful so you never have to use it,,

 delbert

Offline Craig

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1498 on: August 19, 2008, 09:24:52 am »
Don't forget a personal first aid kit on you as well. If you are pinned or injured really badly the kit in the skidder or in a truck on the landing won't do you much good.


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Offline twobears

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1499 on: August 19, 2008, 11:18:23 am »

 CRAIG:you right.i know very few loggers around here that carry a first aid kit right on them.you should carry one plus,you should learn ways to use whats always around you..(your shirt,belt,hands,,ect,ect,ect.i had a licence from the state and i had to have a up to date first aid and cpr card to keep it.when,the time came to use it i was very glad i had it.
 after,i got cut i had alot of time to think about my accident.i learned the military and hopitals use several products to stop bleeding.one is called clotstopper.i learned about that on the web.i printed the info and showed it to my doctor.he told me they had stuff like that also.the clotstopper cames in a MRE type package and is weather proof.a guy could tape it right inside his hardhat.you just open that package and sprinkle it on the wound to stop the flow of blood.

 delbert