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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880786 times)

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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1400 on: March 07, 2008, 07:39:30 pm »
Winter Harvest. White ash sawlogs bucked to length with hard maple sawlogs laying in the background waiting to be picked up by the forwarder. The sawyer's saw oil and gas containers sit on the cut stump as he works on another tree nearby. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

~Ron

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1401 on: March 07, 2008, 08:55:23 pm »
How does the forwarder move amongst the saplings? Do you just pick the path of least damage?


Dave
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Offline rockenbman

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1402 on: March 07, 2008, 10:42:56 pm »
 Most of the time I run my 87 Toyota 4x4 4cyl 4 speed truck for most cuting jobs,like hauln out fire wood, hedge post,brush.And my tools  8)
I love the smell of burnt fuel pouring out of my Jonesred early in the morning.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1403 on: March 08, 2008, 12:19:40 am »
The forwarder runs on existing trails and the paths of least resistence as you stated making effort to knock down the least amount of saplings and regeneration. Some future photos will show a Fabtek 344B forwarder at work.
~Ron

Offline twobears

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1404 on: March 08, 2008, 08:20:32 am »

RON:thanks for the mule center section pic.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1405 on: March 08, 2008, 08:26:01 am »
I kinda think what Dave means.I had my lot cut.It's alot differant than what was posted.I had a lot of old white pine,not much small stuff growing around the trees,like in the picture.He also had a graple,cable skidder too.There was some spots where they would use the skidder to bring the logs to the forwarder.I saw quite a few places where they would pull up along side of a tree that was not bucked to lenght and pull it to him on the forwarder.This required a guy with a chainsaw to be there to buck the tree to log lenght.I should of taken a picture of that.Looked real odd to see a 3 by 80 foot path in the woods.A forwarder CAN do a nice job.Depends ALOT on the operator.You still need trails to get the wood out no matter what.But with a forwarder the logs are being carried out,not dragged out.Alot less damage is done to the ground with a forwarder.I have a steep hill that is the only way across the bog.This hill would of been at the bottom if they would of been skidding the logs.There is less barking up of trees too.My land is kinda of a challange,big rocks,small mounds of dirt,trees I wanted left.I saw one spot where they had to stop and back up the forwarder to save a few trees and go around a big rock.I would not let just a skidder crew on my land.I watched this guy cut for more than 20 years.I do have pictures in my gallery.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1406 on: March 08, 2008, 12:11:23 pm »
Well there is no blanket prescription as to what machine to use. The ground, local climate/season and the vegetation (trees and such)/available seed (good seed years) should dictate the proper system every time. Most of the time it's just $$ driven when you look out the door and see one lot after the other clear cut.  ::)

For instance, a woodlot that was picked through for firewood often grows back with beech in the understory. You could carry the dang firewood wood out by hand or use a machine, still beech regen on some sites. Up here, beech is about as bad as having pin cherry because it all gets infected with disease. I've had instructions from some woodlot owners who want PCT done to cut every one of those %$%$ beech and save all the maple and birch that you can, even aspen is better than growing junk.

Another scenario is cutting hardwood using a type of selection. But, the understory is overtaken by fir that is 40-60 years old, hollow butted and 8-15 feet tall. The S maple and yellow birch may have been very poorly regenerating. Not too hard to age fir if it's intact on the stump and not rotten, whack some off the stump and count rings throughout your work area. Now, you gonna save old suppressed trees about the end of their life? What machine do you use and what type of harvest do you used to help get S maple and Y birch coming?

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1407 on: March 08, 2008, 05:35:23 pm »
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Works its way through a northern hardwood winter selection harvest. Nixon timber harvest;2/08.

~Ron

Offline JLeBouton

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1408 on: March 08, 2008, 09:22:13 pm »
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Works its way through a northern hardwood winter selection harvest. Nixon timber harvest;2/08.

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.) (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Looking good! 

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1409 on: March 08, 2008, 10:27:12 pm »
Yeah, that looks like a nice comfy way to get the logs out! ;D


Dave
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Offline Corley5

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1410 on: March 08, 2008, 10:55:26 pm »
Does that Fabtek have a squirt boom  ???  That's a feature I'd like.  It seems like the boom on Iron Mule is always just a little too short  :) :)
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1411 on: March 09, 2008, 09:54:40 am »
No its not a squirt boom, but it has more reach than the iron mule. Its a bigger machine than the iron mule and can also handle the heavy snow and hills much better. Of course it carries a bigger payload also.

A good operator is key to operating it in selection hardwood thinnings so as to damage the least amount of regen and skinning of the better quality leave trees.
~Ron

Offline moonhill

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1412 on: March 09, 2008, 10:26:14 am »
A person could spend hours going through this thread!  Tim B.
This is a test, please stand by...

Offline semologger

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1413 on: March 09, 2008, 04:00:30 pm »
actually around 18 and a half hours. Slow reader. ;D

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1414 on: March 09, 2008, 05:25:52 pm »
 :D :D :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1415 on: March 09, 2008, 06:44:06 pm »
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. The forwarder operator provides assistance to the  sawyer in getting the hard maple hanger safely down for bucking. He will then pick up the sawlog lengths for transport to the landing/decking area. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

~Ron

Offline TeaW

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1416 on: March 09, 2008, 07:28:30 pm »
Ron  does the sawyer have a machine (skidder ) with him or does he rely on the forwarder for that. How small do they take the wood down to.
TeaW

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1417 on: March 09, 2008, 11:51:09 pm »
The forwarder picks up the cut-to-length sawlogs that the sawyers have bucked at the stump. We usually take the wood down to a 4 inch top, but on this sale sawlogs to an 8 inch top were removed. The landowner wanted the pulpwood and topwood left for his own firewood use.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1418 on: March 10, 2008, 02:49:19 pm »
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Unloads sawlogs at the landing/decking area. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.
 
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1419 on: March 11, 2008, 04:54:32 pm »
Western Star Woodhauler. The Western Star woodhauler arrives at the landing/decking area for a load os sawlogs. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

The woodhauler turns around at the end of the landing while the Fabtech forwarder continues unloading its bunk of sawlogs.


The woodhauler moves into position to the log deck for loading while the Fabtech forwarder is moving around behind it.


The woodhauler prepares to start loading while the Fabtech moves to unload its sawlogs on the opposite deck.
 
~Ron