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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880952 times)

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Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1240 on: March 05, 2007, 09:09:49 pm »
But that is what the forwarder is for,to sort out the logs at the landing.

All of my jobs have a variety of species of pulp along with red oak and maple sawlogs. I have found that it's easier to forward only one species at a time. It probably takes more driving thru the woods, but not more trips to the landing. But it saves a lot of time and trouble sorting at the landing. And it is much faster and a lot less trouble loading trucks with only one species in a pile.

Of course with a cut to length harvester, I try to keep each species piled separately in the woods. It just seems faster to keep the species sorted, rather than mixing and then resorting. Plus, I just hate to sort!

How does every else handle sorting?
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Offline Corley5

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1241 on: March 06, 2007, 09:48:46 am »
I was hauling everything out in mixed loads but it was taking forever at the landing to sort it.  Now I haul out one species of sawlogs and bolts per load and sort them at the landing.  It saves a lot of time, handling, and moving to different piles.  While loading in the woods I short stack the firewood so I can pick it up faster when I get back to it
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1242 on: March 06, 2007, 04:03:45 pm »
Gary,this guy has been here 3 weeks and at least 20 trailer truck loads of white pine has been hauled out of here.This is really all that he is cutting unless a hardwood tree gets in his way.I've cut most of the hardwood that will make any good size logs.Out of the 20 and more loads,he hasn't cut enough hardwood to make a trailer load of pulp yet.That's what I meant by using the forwarder to sort logs.Wouldn't make sense to mix everything up and than sort it.He only has a few hardwood trees per each load of pine logs.Probaly knowing this guy he's pulling the small hardwood out first,than cuts the pine tree down.Once these pine goes down,it burys everything under the brush and you never see whats under it.This time he cutting alot of the scrub pine.Some crotch out 4 times,but are big at the butt for about 6-12 feet.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1243 on: March 06, 2007, 04:55:47 pm »
You sure have a lot of pine on that lot. Does Irving buy it?

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1244 on: March 06, 2007, 06:03:39 pm »
Yes,swampdockey,your beloved Irving is buying it.They are begging for some pallet pine,just the stuff he is cutting.They cut out all the knots out,than dovetail it,and make a fortune on it.If they need it that bad,raise the price on it.  :D  :D  :D Irving in Dixfield will not be buying any good pine in about 2 weeks.Everyone is being shut off.I've been selling to them for 15 years or whenever they bought the plant from Dixfield Lumber.I always felt I got a good price from them.They will buy anything which was good when I was doing the cutting.If a hardwood tree was in the way,I could sell them a few logs and not have it sitting aroung going bad.I hope to get a tour of the plant coming up this spring.He should be able to come back about 2 more times and that will be it for about 20 years.I will let the rest grow.Need some for my sawmill.  ;D
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1245 on: March 06, 2007, 06:52:44 pm »
Figured.  ;D But, don't get too comfortable. They are just as likely to turn a 180 as bull in a ring. ;)

They were looking for pine in my area one time back in 1998 or so. But they got discouraged when it was explained that we might have 1 mature pine every 100 acres. They're 200 years too late, since it's mostly been cut and just the ones nobody wanted left standing. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Craig

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1246 on: March 06, 2007, 07:15:30 pm »
I just got the letter from Irving last week. Try Hancock Lumber, their specs are identical to Irvings and the prices are similar too! My biggest problem lately has been getting trailers down here in MA because they aren't sending any finished product down this way. They won't just send a trailer down empty.

Craig
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1247 on: March 06, 2007, 08:22:06 pm »
I know about Hancock.In fact the logger I have use to sell to them,now he mostly deals with Irving.Just as well he is getting done,the scrub pine will buy us some time.I don't want him on mine land making any ruts.And he knows that.Mud season will be here soon.I would hate to tell him to leave.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1248 on: March 06, 2007, 08:23:17 pm »
They will usually forward only one species to the landing at a time, but then sort the species by products and lengths such as veneer, grade logs, scrag logs, pulpwood, pellet stock, firewood, etc.
~Ron

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1249 on: March 08, 2007, 04:51:41 pm »
This is what you don't want to see at your sawmill,hemlock shake




The straight line down the center is done by a chainsaw.Was bigger than 28 inches so it had to be split.The forwarder will split it the rest of the way.The other end of this 8 foot log looked a lot better.I would guess it's at least 70 years old,may even be up to 100.There were a few other trees,but the rest did not look like this.




Winching a white pine up to the skidder.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1250 on: March 08, 2007, 04:57:41 pm »
A 28 " (DBH) hemlock would be over 200 years up here.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1251 on: March 08, 2007, 09:27:00 pm »
This tree was only 24"at DBH.I counted 110 rings.I could of missed a few.I know that hemlock grow slow.I only guessed and I was a little low.Some of the rings almost tounched in most years.Good thing I had a pen with me to keep track.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1252 on: March 09, 2007, 05:57:31 am »
What about the first 60 years, growing on top of one another, within an inch around the pith?  ;D ;)

j/k They will do well if growing in good conditions. I don't doubt your ring count.  ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1253 on: March 09, 2007, 09:44:45 am »
Here's some pictures I took while in Pictou NS last winter. The first pictures are a Timberjack 1010 forwarder and the last one is a 1270 harvester.




Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1254 on: March 16, 2007, 07:25:19 pm »
4510 Iron Mule Forwarder. Waiting to start its forwarding job. Malmborg timber harvest, 2/07 & 3/07.




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Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1255 on: March 18, 2007, 08:36:12 am »
 Ron, I noticed that the centers of the machine and the loader not the same. does the loader have to hang on the front half somewhere when turning the machine?
 Can someone (PLEASE) let me borrow/give me ones of these. My skidder broke a drive U and did something to my transfer case so it chatters when pushed going down hill.
Ed K

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1256 on: March 18, 2007, 09:52:47 am »
Ed,
The loader sits on top of the bunk load and just pivots with the machine when turning.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1257 on: March 18, 2007, 10:06:07 am »
5010 Iron Mule Forwarder. This is a larger size iron mule forwarder recently seen along the roadside in Michigan's U.P. Note that the boom is pivoted and down on its opposite side.


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Offline dail_h

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1258 on: March 18, 2007, 06:38:45 pm »
   I agree with Ed K,"Will someone please give me an iron Mule?" Hear small spoiled brat boy voice. Dosen'thave to be pretty,well painted,old derelick ,abandoned ,ugly as me,,,,,,well ,not quite that bad,would be perfect. If you could deliver it for free would be even better ;D ;D ;D
   Dail,head down running for cover :D :D :D :D
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Offline Gary_C

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1259 on: March 19, 2007, 10:18:19 am »
Most of the early forwarders including Gafner's Iron Mules had the loader's mounted on the front half with the cab, some (not Gafner's) even had roof top mounted loaders. After Gafner was bought out by Valmet (Partek Forest Products) the 500 series and the 600 series Valmets had the loaders mounted on the front. Finally the Valmet 800 series machines had the loaders mounted on the bunk section where they belong.

Those early machines with the loader on the front were a pain for sure, but they are still very productive machines and many are still working daily in the woods. However if you have a lot of pulp wood to move, especially behind a harvester cutting 50-100 cords per day, you need a newer double bunk forwarder with six or eight wheels, mini joysticks, a loader with an extend a boom on the rear half, and an automatic transmission.

Yes, there are some older machines they are practically giving away.  :D
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