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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881031 times)

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Offline Paul_H

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #120 on: May 21, 2002, 09:00:24 pm »
Ron,
Do you carry a video camera?Any chance to see it as "sawmills in action"?It looks like a real tree eater!
eg  tregar  meste  på  Tulla, for  ho  var  krulla  i  ulla.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #121 on: May 22, 2002, 06:19:15 pm »
No I don't have a video camera. I just carry a simple Ricoh 35 mm with 400 film and a $25.00 backup Kodak when that fails. I'm not too high tech.

That Chipper does eat up the trees and spits them out.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #122 on: May 22, 2002, 06:41:22 pm »
Trelan 23L Chipper Blowing Chips. Some excess chips at the end of the operation are blown out to mulch and stabilize the landing before closure.




~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #123 on: May 23, 2002, 07:18:03 am »
Kenworth & "Pup". Loading out pulpwood from the landing.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #124 on: May 23, 2002, 07:22:54 pm »
Kenworth Starting to Roll. Loaded with pulpwood.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #125 on: May 24, 2002, 10:59:12 am »
Kenworth Under-way. Headed for the mill with load of hardwood pulp.


~Ron

Offline Tom

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #126 on: May 24, 2002, 11:11:36 am »
Y'all must have a tremendous used tire problem up there.  Lordy, look at all those axles.
extinct

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #127 on: May 24, 2002, 04:02:47 pm »
They do keep the tire shops in business and we do have a used tire problem. The cogeneration plants fueled by wood chips are now seeking permits from DEQ to burn tires in a mixture with the wood chips. Expensive scrubbers are required on their stacks however to eliminate the sulfides etc. That's the political debate right now.

This producer whose truck is pictured has seven such semi's and an equal number of chip vans and he has another new semi on order. Just think of his tire bills alone. I remember when he started with a chain saw and old iron-mule forwarder on one of my first jobs. He is one that has done well.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #128 on: May 26, 2002, 11:12:45 am »
Sawmill Loading Out Excess Sawdust. A mill's sawdust may also find a market for increased wood utilization.


~Ron

Online Jeff

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #129 on: May 26, 2002, 11:37:52 am »
Rons' picture of the sawdust loading reminded me of a question that I hear all the Time. What do you guys do with your waste?

I say there is no waste in our mill. Everything is utilized. The Bark is shredded and used for Mulch and Landscaping.

The Sawdust is used for animal bedding, or trucked to co generation plants to be burned and converted to energy. The slabs are chipped and find thier way to a multitude of companies that process them into other products.

Every spec of every Log that comes into our mill is fully used.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #130 on: May 26, 2002, 02:34:10 pm »
Jeff,

Maybe you can get some pictures of such waste product uses at your mill for posting. Where does the "waste" go?What happens to chips and sawdust is an often asked question, thus the reason I put that picture in. That one was taken at Nelson's Sawmill near Bristol, MI.  
~Ron

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #131 on: May 26, 2002, 03:12:37 pm »
Sawmill by-product

Shredded bark. This is just the way it comes off of the log using our Morbark Debarker. This bark may find its way to almost any part of our state for lanscaping or mulch. Some customers purchase the bark then regrind adding color which makes it last longer. I like it natural, but then again if mine gets to looking old I know where the big pile is.  ;)

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Online Ron Wenrich

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #132 on: May 27, 2002, 04:08:20 am »
Bark in our area only gets used if it is aged.  They want that dark brown color.  Most bark is double ground, and very little gets dyed.

Our wood chips are also turned into mulch.  We don't do it, but another outfit buys chips to shred.  There are also guys who shred old pallets.  This is profitable since they charge to take the pallets away, and it is cheaper than tipping fees at landfills.  Wood mulch can be aged or dyed.
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #133 on: May 27, 2002, 07:19:41 pm »
Red Pine Thinning. Red pine thinning area after last winter's work with the Timbco T415D tracked feller buncher seen in previous photos.


~Ron

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #134 on: May 27, 2002, 07:41:40 pm »
Ron, around here they fight over the bark and the sawdust. All we have to do is keep track of whos checks are good. Sorry Kevin "Cheques" :)
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Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #135 on: May 27, 2002, 09:05:27 pm »
I have sure appreciated this series.  I have found it to be better than a Sears Catalog on a rainy day. :P 8) 8)
Frank Pender

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #136 on: May 28, 2002, 06:26:49 am »
Thanks for the complement. I didn't know if there would be much interest when I started it. We need some logging photos from other parts of the country also to see how things are done else where.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #137 on: May 28, 2002, 06:36:18 pm »
Red Pine Thinning. The first thinning just starting with hand cutter. The slash and woody debris will be left on site to go back into the soil.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #138 on: May 29, 2002, 07:19:24 pm »
Gafner 5110-Iron Mule. This will be the forwarder used on the short-wood red pine sale.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #139 on: May 31, 2002, 01:28:14 pm »
John Deere DC70D Feller-Buncher. Completed its work, being "loaded out" upon completion and closure of timber harvest area.


~Ron