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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880990 times)

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Offline David_c

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1180 on: October 02, 2006, 07:34:59 pm »
Rob I think it is kind of a love it and hate it kinda thing. Loves it when it is up and cutting wood. Hates it when it is broke down again.

Offline Ed_K

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1181 on: October 02, 2006, 09:06:06 pm »
 Kool set up David, are you still working after yesterdays 3+" of rain? Only productive thing I did today was change pins & bushing on the steering pistons on the taylor  ;D .

 Rob, I like the ponsee line, just wish they were priced lower. I'm thinking of going CTL for the improvement cuts.
Ed K

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1182 on: November 05, 2006, 08:31:19 pm »
John Deere 643H Feller Buncher with saw head. MDNR State Forest timber harvest; 9/06.


~Ron

Offline Phorester

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1183 on: November 06, 2006, 08:10:41 pm »
MARCEL, the chip truck being unloaded reminds me of the story an old pulpwood cutter told me years ago.  This is just about word for word from him. When they first started using these at the mill down here, the first time he ever backed his truck on one he just sat there in the cab. 

He said, "Well, the operator comes over and says, 'ain't you gonna git out?"  He said, "nope, I'll just go along for the ride".  The operator says, "well, oookay......"  (I doubt they would let anybody do this now. And this is the point in his story telling where his eyes got real wide).  He said "well..., everything was fine until they got it about halfway up.  I thought they was gonna stop but it kept going up and up an up..."  "All I could see was clear blue sky!"

"Directly all the stuff I had on my dashboard came crashing down into the floorboard.  About that time everything I had up over the visors came crashing down, a'hitting me in the face, along with - musta been a bushel of dust off'en each visor! Came down in my eyes so I couldn't see nothing!" "I sucked in a big wad of it and couldn't even breathe! "The truck was a'groaning and a'straining.  It still kept a'going up and up!  I thought it was just gonna keep going and turn slam over upside down head over tail!"  "It musta been straight up in the ARR!" (He's now standing up with his arms stretched as far as they would go above his head, his eyes still big as dinner plates.)

"Directly it stopped.  I was pinned in the seat, couldn't move, couldn't see, gagging on that dust".  "It was quiet for about 2 seconds, then them chips let go with a great big WHOOOOOOOOOOSH that scared the sh*t right out of me!  Made the whole truck shake like it was a'gonna come apart!  "Then the truck jumped up and down a couple times, and everything got realllllll still....."  "That was scarier than before!" 

"Then it finally starting a'coming down!  "I tell you, my stomach came up in my throat and I thought Lordy Lordy, it's a'coming down too fast and it's a'gonna flatten me and this here truck like a pancake!"

"When it finally stopped, I opened the door, got out and crawled around on the ground for 5 minutes".  "All them fellers was rolling on the ground laughing at me". 

"Ever since then I let one'a THEM back the truck on that dang thing!"

I was on the ground laughing myself for about 10 minutes. 
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1184 on: November 06, 2006, 08:31:14 pm »
Me Toooooo  :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D Air!

Hope Patty, or anyone with a swaller of their morning coffee for that matter, don't let loose all over the 'puter screen.

I woulda loved to be one of the guys laugh'n.  ;D

:D :D :D :D :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1185 on: November 08, 2006, 08:17:54 pm »
John Deere 648G Grapple Skidder.Working on State forest timber harvest 9/06.


~Ron

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1186 on: November 08, 2006, 11:20:01 pm »
Phorester, I rode shotgun on a truck hauling chips to a rail dump north of Wenatchee. They made us get out of the cab and there was no way I was riding that thing anyway. :D :D
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline jph

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1187 on: November 10, 2006, 12:13:43 pm »
And on a smaller scale:



Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1188 on: November 13, 2006, 06:46:08 pm »
Serco 170-A Processor. The slasher bucks aspen and red maple products at the landing from tree lengths skidded by the grapple skidder.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1189 on: November 22, 2006, 12:06:19 pm »
John Deere Feller Buncher & Grapple Skidder. Parked at the landing. These units are common to a tree length clear-cut operation. State forest timber harverst; 9/06.


~Ron

Offline SteveB

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1190 on: November 23, 2006, 07:31:35 pm »
Ron,

How does the productivity of those drive-to-tree machines compare to a conventional buncher on tracks with a boom?  I've always wondered about them as I've never seen one used anywhere in Canada.  I would imagine that the wheeled machine would have a hard time if the ground was rought at all?  I guess they'd be ok if you don't need to protect regen. or select from between residauls.  Are they cheaper than a tracked machine?  I would imagine they are easier to maintain?  The common saying with tracked gera if "every meter you travel with those thinkgs is one day closer to their death". 

I'd really like to see one of those wheeled bunchers work. The other two pieces of gear that I've only seen in pictures are bar saw slashers and pull through delimbers.  What area thier advantages?  In the pictures it always looks like they're in the southern US.  We have lots processors, stroke delimbers, and circular saw slashers, but I've never seen the others in real life.


Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1191 on: November 23, 2006, 08:08:18 pm »
I've never seen one of those type of bunchers here either. All tracked and boomed. They are especially suited to work in mixed woods, softwood and on rocky terrain. Less compaction, less travel, a boom is much narrower to reach between trees. But, if you get the wrong operator on those boomed machines, I've seen them destroy advanced regen. You have to lift the tree clear and bring out to the trail to slash on the trail and not try to work over head of the regen. Now that ain't so easy with big heavy hardwood, if not impossible. I could see more traveling and such with Ron's machine but if your in big hardwood your doing less damage to residual trees even though your reach path is probably wider to get the trees out. A boomed outfit would work on most hardwood sites here because the average piece size is under 10 inches. You get wood 20 or 40 inches, I don't think I want a boom trying to reach and cherry pick your trees. You might end up over on your side.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1192 on: November 23, 2006, 08:27:05 pm »
A lot depends upon how firm the soil is, timber types, size, and type of harvest. The rubber tired feller bunches make good production on firm soils and smaller tree diameters of especially pine and aspen. They are also used more on "clear-cut" harvests rather than selective harvests.

More tracked machines with processing heads on a boom are used in Michigan's UP on the wetter soils and more for cut to length harvests where the tree lengths are processed at the stump. They do more processing rather than just total tree falling and bunching prior to skidding.

I have one tracked processor working on a job right now. I'll put on photos of it soon.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1193 on: November 26, 2006, 07:56:22 pm »
Hitacchi Tracked Processor With Issusu Engine. Working in an oak, aspen, and mixed hardwoods stand. Gothard timber harvest; 10/06.


~Ron

Offline sprucebunny

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1194 on: November 26, 2006, 08:28:55 pm »
This harvester was working just down the road from me recently.The land owners cut some individual w.pine and expanded a field.

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Offline SteveB

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1195 on: November 27, 2006, 11:11:34 pm »
Ron,

That looks like a slingshot processor.  I've seen them work in softwoods and boreal hardwoods, but they were really too slow to be productive enough in those conditions.  I always thought they'd make up for there speed with limbing force in hardwoods like you'd have in Michigan?  Does this guy cut off the stump or process behind a buncher?

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1196 on: November 28, 2006, 08:43:15 pm »
The operator cuts at the stump and then processes and piles the product lengths for forwarding.

On large sawlog trees they will delimb the tree, cut the smaller diameter products from above and leave the larger sawlog diameter section standing for the chainsaw faller to take down at the stump.
~Ron

Offline Corley5

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1197 on: November 28, 2006, 09:24:47 pm »
On large sawlog trees they will delimb the tree, cut the smaller diameter products from above and leave the larger sawlog diameter section standing for the chainsaw faller to take down at the stump.

That's a time saver 8) 8)
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1198 on: December 01, 2006, 06:51:42 pm »
Valmet Forwarder. Picking up the "cut to length" products behind the tracked processor. Gothard timber harvest; 10/06.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1199 on: December 04, 2006, 05:43:17 pm »
Time To Sharpen The "Husky". The faller takes time to sharpen his saw while cutting oak and cherry saw logs. He makes use of the vice provided on the tool truck.


~Ron