The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 880961 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35184
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1120 on: May 06, 2006, 08:15:21 pm »
we avrage aroud $275 mbf here if you  take 70$ for transport and split by 2 for the land owner = 102.5$ each......now if i do 5 to 6 face corde at $75 each less the $10 for stump fee and i do local transport...$325 to $390 all in cash money ;D..

I only pay $190/cord this year. Stumped, bucked, split, delivered to my yard. Of course I have mostly rock maple and yellow birch, and I pay by cheque. If it were a sawlog beech, it would be more profitable to sell as logs depending on quantity unless your labour and machine hours mean nothing. No purchase tax here anyway on primary forest products, only income tax if selling. ;)  ::)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Gary_C

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6061
  • Age: 75
  • Location: Blooming Prairie, MN USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Sunrise on the Prairie
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1121 on: May 06, 2006, 09:56:06 pm »
If the logging companies are insured through the Michigan Timbermen's self insurance program, their cutters then need to be certified in proper chain saw use and tree falling and safe other logging practices.


Ron

Can you explain this self insurance program?
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1122 on: May 07, 2006, 12:06:51 pm »
Gary, See their web site for full information.

http://www.matsif.com/
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1123 on: May 09, 2006, 04:58:24 pm »
The Old Iron Mule. An older forwarder that continues to perform well, especially in selection harvests. Austin timber harvest; 4/06.


~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1124 on: May 29, 2006, 06:53:14 pm »
More names noted on the woodhauler trucks. 

"Timber Wolf"
"Attitude"
"Smoking Joe"
"One Olf"
"Low Rider"
"Woody"
"Just Dew It"
"Lucky"
~Ron

Offline bitternut

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 590
  • Age: 76
  • Location: western new york
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1125 on: May 29, 2006, 10:17:08 pm »
UUUMMMMM.........Ron it looks like maybe the Mat safety officer was not in the vicinity of the guy felling that big beech tree. From the picture it looks like he did not move away from the tree at least 15' and at a 45 deg angle from the direction of fall. What do you think?

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1126 on: May 30, 2006, 04:21:50 pm »
Yes, The MAT Safety Officer made a point of discussing that with him and the other fallers observing, especially the 45 degree angle from direction of fall. A good refresher for all in attendance.
~Ron

Offline Gary_C

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6061
  • Age: 75
  • Location: Blooming Prairie, MN USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Sunrise on the Prairie
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1127 on: June 03, 2006, 01:51:42 am »
Here are some pictures of my cut to length equipment.

Valmet 546 Harvester


Valmet 840 Forwarder Filled with fuel for the next day. Just traded a single bunk Valmet 644 for this machine this winter. I needed the extra capacity and the 6 wheel machine with tracks.





Load of Aspen Pulp All tied down and ready to roll. Jan 26, 05



Unloading Pulp wood at the mill This was taken July 8, 05


 

Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline barbender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5103
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Deer River MN
  • Gender: Male
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1128 on: June 04, 2006, 10:52:03 pm »
Nice looking equipment there Gary. What mill is that?  If you don't mind me asking, what do you have invested in your team? I'm just curious cause I dream about having a team someday too, but I know it won't be new Ponsse's. Way too much dinero $$$. 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline UNCLEBUCK

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1931
  • Location: Henning,Mn
  • Gender: Male
  • Life out on the prairie !
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1129 on: June 16, 2006, 01:53:54 am »
Very cool equipment everyone has ! I will be thinking of all these pictures when I go to the woods soon with my old tractor and a 5 gallon can of gas and chainsaw .  You all could yank out more logs in one day than I will in 2 months.  But it sure is fun to see the pictures . 
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1130 on: June 19, 2006, 06:09:33 pm »
High Stumps Stump heights for sawlog size trees are to be cut to 12 inches. Here the sawyer recuts a "high stump" for contract compliance. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.


~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35184
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1131 on: June 20, 2006, 04:15:59 am »
Ron, here is a link to procedures used to report residue and waste on crownlands in BC. I remember doing some of those surveys and you were partly doing forensics to piece together or reason certain situations. If you didn't you were constantly digging the logger even if he was following regulations in his logging practice especially when it came to WHSCC. In your pic, it almost looks like defect at the butt so the cut was made high. But, I
assume they are harsh on compliance with the contract.

http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hva/manuals/rwprocedures/

[Furgott the link] ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1132 on: June 20, 2006, 08:15:43 am »
Yes, in defective trees and in large multi-stem trunks such as oak the trees may be cut high, but then the high stump must be lowered to 12 inches or less.

We will allow some designated high stumps for wildlife purposes, etc. but not many excessive high stumps.
~Ron

Offline Raphael

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1116
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Warren, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • Willing and able to do a boring job.
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1133 on: June 23, 2006, 10:20:23 am »
Great thread!!!

Last time our property was logged (we are on a 20-25yr cycle) it was one man and his cable skidder.  He was excellent, a far better operator than the fellows who were here in the late 60s who managed to hit every tree within 15ft of the main skid road.



I do some very limited selective timber harvesting for my own use and need to up the capacity of my "skidder".
Here are a couple pictures from the other end of the spectrum:


Here's Dad securing a small Hickory log.


A long maple on it's way to the mill.

Anyone skidding with less than 12hp.    :D ;D :D
... he was middle aged,
and the truth hit him like a man with no parachute.
 --Godley & Creme

Stihl 066, MS 362 C-M & 24+ feet of Logosol M7 mill

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1134 on: June 27, 2006, 05:37:19 pm »
Trimming Slash. Aesthetics of the harvest area is always a concern. The feller trims the slash to lie within 4 feet of the ground or less concurently with cutting. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.


~Ron

Offline timberjack240

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 375
  • Age: 28
  • Location: pennsylvania
  • Gender: Male
  • show me a man witha timberjack ill show you a rea
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1135 on: June 27, 2006, 09:16:07 pm »
Trimming Slash.
round here we call that "lop the tops" ...

 

Offline Tom

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 25854
  • Age: 74
  • Location: Jacksonville, Florida
  • Gender: Male
    • Toms Saw
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1136 on: June 27, 2006, 09:39:23 pm »
Around here, it is trimming slash too if it is big enough.  There was a time when it was justs as good a pulpwood as the logs, but, they've done away with the short-wood pulpwooder.

Now, instead of sawing a lot of it up with a chainsaw, it is run over with skidders or other big forest equipment to mash it close to the ground, where it will rot.
extinct

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1137 on: June 27, 2006, 11:52:44 pm »
The contract wording for handling slash is "lop and scatter". It is cut with chain saw and or run over with forwarder, skidder, feller buncher, etc. to lie as close to the ground as possible.

Some high slash may be designated for leaving during the operation for wildlife purposes and firewood removal by the forester administering the harvest.
~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35184
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1138 on: June 28, 2006, 05:10:28 am »
Trimming Slash. Aesthetics of the harvest area is always a concern. The feller trims the slash to lie within 4 feet of the ground or less concurently with cutting. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

A local logger told me this spring if he can look out across his cut block and see a big top stuck up there 12 feet in the air he knows someone in his crew has wasted wood. He told me he has to lean hard on his crew to always use all the wood.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7698
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Ron Scotts Web
Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1139 on: June 28, 2006, 10:53:15 am »
That's what we want, good wood utilization of all commercial wood. Our standard "rule of thumb" is that "everything is left straight with the world". "All uncut trees are left straight up and down and all slash is left horizontal with the ground so we can see across the stand".
~Ron