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Author Topic: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment  (Read 881132 times)

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Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1060 on: February 19, 2006, 12:39:49 am »
I'll try that again
Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1061 on: February 19, 2006, 12:42:56 am »
 and again                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1062 on: February 19, 2006, 12:49:45 am »
some more                                                                                                                           


Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1063 on: February 19, 2006, 12:52:32 am »
and one more                                                       
Too many irons in the fire

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1064 on: February 19, 2006, 10:33:13 am »
I have watched skidders a lot and driven them a couple of times, to move them around the yard, but never one 6 wheels. It looks like it might be clumsy to turn and maybe tough to back up.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline DanG

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1065 on: February 19, 2006, 11:32:06 am »
He didn't seem to have any trouble maneuvering, Sawguy.  The thing did seem a bit slow moving around, though.  There was a more normal looking Franklin skidder working with him, and it would run circles around the big guy, but only drag about a fourth as much wood.  That seemed to be more of a traction issue.  He had 4 tires on the ground, and the big'un had 12.
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1066 on: February 19, 2006, 11:48:52 am »
barbender, where you at? The wood doesn't look much bigger than plantation black spruce, although that doesn't look like plantation. Should have maybe been thinned a long time ago though. Nice peice of equipment. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1067 on: February 20, 2006, 08:13:53 pm »
Swampdonkey- I am in north- central minnesota. That is just wild grown black spruce in a peat swamp, they never really thin the black spruce around here. All I have seen on black spruce is clear cuts.  The management plan called for aerial reseeding, which they do a lot of around here with both white and black spruce.  Something I thought was cool was my buddy would take a stem and run it into the ground to measure the frost, and keep it going down through the peat until it hit something hard- about twelve feet down.  It's been so unusually mild this winter that there is hardly any frost in the ground, so the loggers have been having a hard time getting at the winter timber in the swamps. The day I took those pictures we had just got a cold snap with lows in the -20 to -30F range, so the job they were working was just freezing enough that the forwarder wasn't breaking through anymore.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1068 on: February 20, 2006, 08:35:19 pm »
Alot of those black spruce bogs are layered here. The lower branches of a black spruce gets trained by snowload over a period of years and eventually takes root. Often you'll see a taller tree in the middle of little ones circling it. Never had any personal experience with aerial seeding, but I would think it would be fairly successful in moss. They don't do it here, they just plant by hand. Often times, if the logging is timed right in a good seed year there is all kinds of regen in 3 years and alot of those are advanced seedlings from before logging if the stand isn't too dense. The overwintering semi serotinus cones open up in the slash in the heat of the sun during spring and early summer. Terrible slow growing sites though. ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1069 on: February 21, 2006, 04:27:34 pm »
swampdonkey- I didn't check any of these trees but our black spruce grows real slow here. It wouldn't surprise me if those trees in the pics were 75-100 years old.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1070 on: March 01, 2006, 06:00:14 pm »
Here are a few pics I snapped while at work..select cutting 160 acres in New Hampshire

                             Rob



here is one of the skid roads

Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1071 on: March 01, 2006, 06:01:37 pm »
Here is a downhill view of another skid road



Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1072 on: March 01, 2006, 06:03:20 pm »
Here is a pic of our landing thats our 460D skidder and 384 TMS Prentice delimber/slasher and in the back in the 280 Prentice used for feeding chipper and loading trucks



Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1073 on: March 01, 2006, 06:04:18 pm »
Here is a pic of our 425 Timbco heading thru the woods



Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1074 on: March 01, 2006, 06:05:17 pm »
here is a pic of the timbco with a fresh cut beech in the head



Offline Rob

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1075 on: March 01, 2006, 06:05:58 pm »
another pic of the 460D



Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1076 on: March 01, 2006, 07:06:22 pm »
Great pictures Rob, thanks. Your settup was similar to a fellow I cruised wood and layed trails out for. He and his partner headed west after the big down turn in the industry and do trucking out there in the northern part of the praries. Alot of outfits had to leave NB in the last couple of years.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1077 on: March 18, 2006, 10:20:24 pm »
 I'm back cutting the last couple of loads of aspen off of our place, I've been cutting this stuff for the last 5 winters whenever we needed a few bucks. I think I've taken about 140 cords of aspen off our ten acres, almost paid for the property so that worked out pretty good.     




Too many irons in the fire

Offline barbender

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1078 on: March 18, 2006, 10:23:04 pm »
  There is birch mixed in that stand too, but I'm not cutting that. Here's the beast I'm skidding with   

 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
« Reply #1079 on: March 19, 2006, 06:30:27 am »
Aspen sure can yield alot of volume per acre if it's healthy and large stuff. We cut over 300 cords of just aspen on 10 acres in 1983, that was besides the hardwood and softwood that wasn't cut. Only thing was, the rest should have been taken because the stand was too open and the maples died and alot of the softwood blew over and made fertilizer. If your not careful with the amount of basal area you remove around the birch they will start to die back in 3 years, and if you cut one with symptoms it will be full of pocket rot.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry