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Author Topic: emerald ash borer  (Read 26913 times)

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Offline MSU_Keith

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #80 on: March 08, 2005, 11:01:13 am »
The link given by Ken Bell has links to other sites that seam to contradict each other regarding pesticide effectiveness:

One says it is effective:
http://ash.info.ms/
Not sure how 'official' this link is.

Another says only marginally effective under specific conditions:
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/bulletin.pdf

Estiers: Any current data on pesticide studies or has this route been abandoned?

Offline estiers

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #81 on: March 08, 2005, 02:32:15 pm »
The 2004 data on pesticides has not been released as far as I know, and those results might shed more light on the situation.  However, anyone who has used pesticides will tell you that they are not 100% effective.  They are variable depending on the temperature, rainfall, soil type, etc.  So, it depends on your mission.  There are treatments that are effective (over 80%), but the mission of the CFIA, USDA, MDA, ODA, and INDNR is not to be "effective."  It is to stop the pest from moving into other areas.  That is why you see the "drastic" measures being used. 

I can say that in the fight against EAB, 76% mortality from BotaniGard (quoted on ash.info.ms) would not be effective in areas that are infested by EAB.  One female can lay up to 250 eggs.  76% is 190, leaving 60 adults (30 pairs) to emerge and mate.  In the second generation you then have 30*250, or 7500 adults.  76% is 5700, leaving 1800 adults alive to mate.  In the third generation you then have 900*250, or 225000 adults.  76% is 171000, leaving 54000 adults alive to mate.  As you can see, in a program who's goal is to stop the spread and hopefully eradicate the pest, even 85% control is not enough.

To keep up on the most recent EAB research findings, look in on  the www.emeraldashborer.info every once in awhile to see if the new research has been added. 
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Offline Corley5

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #82 on: March 08, 2005, 06:50:24 pm »
In the latest issue of the Michigan Farm Bureau News there is an article on research currently being done on parasitic wasps that seem to be natural enemies of the EAB.  The wasps were found in a study plot in Livonia and are of the genus Balcha which feed on the EAB larva and the genus Pediobius which attacks EAB eggs.  It is suspected that at least one of these wasps was unknown to science to until now.  Precisely identifying the wasps will take time as there are 215 known species of Pediobius worldwide with 32 of them in known to exist in the U.S.  Exact identies need to be nailed down if they are going to be any assistance in controlling the EAB.  The scientists involved in this research have also been to S. Korea, Japan, and Mongolia seeking other natural enemies of the EAB.  We can always hope :) :(
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Offline MSU_Keith

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #83 on: March 13, 2005, 06:12:10 pm »
Here's a link to an article in this weekends paper.  Before reading it remember how you voted on the eminent domain poll  ;).

http://www.freep.com/features/living/ash12e_20050312.htm

I think the ground is as frozen now as it has been all winter so I am not sure what the problem is.  The article doesn't really list tree size but I imagine this would come into play if he is planning to do the work himself.

Offline farmerdoug

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #84 on: March 13, 2005, 11:04:16 pm »
In my area the ash population is high.  If they where to cut all of the ash in our section it would be a clearcut in certain chunks of up to 15 acres.  If I hear they are coming here I will have all of the ash here cut and piled for firewood and they can buy it if they want it.  Even with heating all of my greenhouses there is several years worth of firewood and I am sure not going to let them grind it up and haul it away for nothing.  Eminent Domain mains they are to atleast pay a token for it if nothing else in my opinion anyways.
Doug
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Offline Tom

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #85 on: April 14, 2005, 02:00:48 pm »
At the risk of diluting the input here, I think that the best way to combat environmental diseases, especially those that are imported, is to make every one aware of the problem.  It's education, awareness and all of us accepting the responsibilities for the fight that will let us win these battles, and maybe the war.

A neighbor site, run by Steve Nix, has a thread started on EAB. While I don't recognize it as the same thread I saw a couple of days ago, it still represents a place where the population can get good information.  It also has members who aren't afraid to stand up against bad forestry practices, advertisements for miracle cures and the initiation of erroneous information.

If you decide to visit there, don't be surprised to find some of your buddies from here over there. :D  Please remember who you represent  :)

The Forestry Forum, here, is still my home, but, this is a place I visit:

http://forums.about.com/ab-forestry/messages/?msg=4103.1

 
extinct

Online Jeff

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #86 on: May 13, 2005, 10:38:35 am »
Tuesday, Chet and I took a drive over to Midland county where my dad was born and raised and 3 generations of Brokaws before him.  We went over to take a walk on the property and look at different tree species. We found this on the farm, directly across from the old house. (there is a lot of ash on the river flats there)




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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #87 on: May 14, 2005, 10:51:48 am »
You have a EAB trap and detection tree on your property, so you should be one of the first to know if your area becomes infected.  :P
~Ron

Offline Chet

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #88 on: May 14, 2005, 08:01:17 pm »
It would be a real shame if the property did become infected as there are many very nice ash.
I am a true TREE HUGGER, if I didnt I would fall out!  chet the arborist

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #89 on: May 14, 2005, 11:39:04 pm »
Yes, it looks that way. They usually select one of the "poorer" trees for a trap/detection tree and that one they used looks pretty good.
~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #90 on: May 15, 2005, 06:28:15 am »
 ;D ;D I consider all my ash to be perfect, but of course they aren't. ;D :D Now if someone could invent a cheap portable 'moose swatter' to keep'm from scraping their antlers on the bark.  :-\  >:(

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline MSU_Keith

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #91 on: May 15, 2005, 08:45:06 pm »
An interesting change in the quarentine area - the old practice for when the county road commission trims and cuts back the trees in the right of way was to chip the crowns on the spot and leave the bigger chunks in the ditch for the firewood scavengers.  Now they add a step - whenever they cut an ash they staple a firewood movement warning all over the logs. I guess every little bit helps.

Offline Dana

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #92 on: May 29, 2005, 08:13:14 am »
The MDA put a trap tree on our property also. We are located in Charlevoix County and the beetle has been found on the otherside of the county. (about 15 miles away) The state is taking the trap tree issue seriously in our area judging from the fact that the traps are about a mile and a half apart on the road ways here.
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Offline populus

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #93 on: May 29, 2005, 10:38:05 am »
A question for those of you living in the EAB zones:  Are there any beetles out yet?  You don't usually see the adults (they fly high in the canopy) but you will see fresh D-shaped exit wholes.  Is MDA or anyone else reporting emergence dates?

Offline estiers

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #94 on: June 08, 2005, 01:45:25 pm »
For any of you interested in helping spread the word, and who would be willing to put a bumper magnet on thier vehicles, please visit www.emeraldashborer.info to get a free bumper magnet just like the one under my name.
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Offline estiers

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #95 on: June 28, 2005, 08:06:01 am »
I recently made reservations to go camping in a Canadian Provincial Park.  During the transaction, the gentleman asked for my address, and then asked me to confirm my location (I live in Ypsilanti, MI - right in the heart of the EAB quarantine).  He then proceded to say: "It looks like you live in an Emerald Ash Borer quarantined county.  Please do not bring firewood with you when you come to Canada."  As you can imagine, I was thrilled by this.

Have any of the rest of you had this type of communication, either with a reservation for a Canadian Park, or a Michigan State Park?
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Online Jeff

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #96 on: June 28, 2005, 09:45:44 am »
No, but I am having more and more instances where people would like me to look at a dead ash tree. One just this past weekend in Oceola county. (No sign of EAB that I could see, the tree was dead and the bark was falling off, and full of ants, but zero tell-tale EAB signs) Awareness seems to be going up.
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Offline estiers

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #97 on: June 28, 2005, 10:32:07 am »
 smiley_clapping
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Offline estiers

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #98 on: July 01, 2005, 02:55:59 pm »
Here to wish everyone a great 4th of July weekend, and to remind you:

 DON'T MOVE FIREWOOD
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #99 on: August 07, 2005, 09:03:43 pm »
Emerald Ash Bore. These large white ash trees are dying from the emerald ash bore. Note that it is now quite obvious in the crown of the tree on the left but not so obvious yet in the tree on the right.

Trees are located in southern Michigan near the northeastern Indiana border; 8/05.


~Ron